Archive for the ‘Linux and FreeBSD Desktop’ Category

How to install custom Font files on Linux with font-viewer, fc-cache, font-manager – Install Church Slavonic fonts on GNU / Linux

Saturday, October 27th, 2018

install-custom-fonts-on-linux-easily-linux-libertine-alphabet-typography-font-u-shaped

If you're regularly using GIMP for Image Editing or LibreOffice for Office stuff or any other program that you might use to add / edit fonts, then you certainly will come to a point wondering how to manually add new .TTF (TrueType Fonts) or .AFM .PBM.
Using apt-get  install tool multiple fonts can be searched in Debian / Ubuntu repos, but adding a third party fonts provided by some random graphics designer is a necessity.

For example earlier I've blogged on What is Church Slavonic and collected a large collection pack of Church Slavonic fonts ready which I used to install at that time on a Windows 7 PC, question comes how this fonts once downloaded can be added / installed so Xorg running and Font rendering programs on GNU / Linux are aware of the new downloaded fonts and can be used in various programs?

gnome-font-viewer-program-gnu-linux-screenshot

The easiest way to install font in Linux is to Double click over the new font you want to install that would run Font Viewer program in GNOME GUI environment when clicked over fonts the  gnome-font-viewer) opens, however it is tedicious task to install in that manner if you have to instal some new 100 or 200 fonts by clicking over each.

To make the new downloaded pack of fonts on a user level it is as simple as downloading the number of fonts and placing them in $HOME/fonts folder e.g. in ~/.fonts (in some distributions placing the new fonts under ~/usr/local/share/fonts makes them available for use on next Xsession login.

To make new fonts available system-wide (e.g. for all existing or logged in in Xorg) users it is as simple as copying all new font files (TTF, PFM, PFB etc.) you'd like to add to /usr/local/share/fonts:
 

# cp -rpf ~/Desktop/fonts-folder/* /usr/local/share/fonts/


And run fs-cache to rescan and build new font cache files based on the fonts copied

 

 fc-cache -f -v


To check whether the new fonts are present you can list all available fonts with:

 

fc-list

 

/usr/share/fonts/truetype/lato/Lato-Medium.ttf: Lato,Lato Medium:style=Medium,Regular
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/msttcorefonts/comicbd.ttf: Comic Sans MS:style=Bold,Negreta,tučné,fed,Fett,Έντονα,Negrita,Lihavoitu,Gras,Félkövér,Grassetto,
Vet,Halvfet,Pogrubiony,Negrito,Полужирный,Fet,Kalın,Krepko,Lodia
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/lato/Lato-SemiboldItalic.ttf: Lato,
Lato Semibold:style=Semibold Italic,Italic
/usr/local/share/fonts/TriKUcs.pfb: Triodion kUcs:style=Regular
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/dejavu/DejaVuSerif-Bold.ttf: DejaVu Serif:style=Bold
/usr/local/share/fonts/OglUcs8.ttf: Oglavie Ucs:style=Regular
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/noto/NotoSansThai-Regular.ttf: Noto Sans Thai:style=Regular
/usr/local/share/fonts/freefont-20080323/FreeSerifBold.ttf: FreeSerif:style=Bold,polkrepko
/usr/local/share/fonts/TITUSEN.TTF: Titus SyriacEstrangelo:style=Regular
/usr/local/share/fonts/feofanucs.ttf: Feofan Ucs:style=Regular
/usr/local/share/fonts/OstgDSoIEUcs8.ttf: Ostrog\-Dol ieUcs:style=SpacedOut
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/dejavu/DejaVuSansMono.ttf: DejaVu Sans Mono:style=Book
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/noto/NotoSansCypriot-Regular.ttf: Noto Sans Cypriot:style=Regular
/usr/local/share/fonts/ZlatUcs.pfb: Zlatoust Ucs:style=Regular
..
.

 


To look for a certain font supposed to be installed run cmd:

 

fc-list|grep -i "Times New Roman"
/usr/share/fonts/truetype/msttcorefonts/Times_New_Roman.ttf: Times New Roman:style=Regular,Normal,obyčejné,Standard,Κανονικά,
Normaali,Normál,Normale,Standaard,Normalny,Обычный,Normálne,Navadno,thường,Arrunta

 

fc-list|grep -i "slavonic"
/usr/local/share/fonts/TITUSN__.TTF: Titus Slavonic:style=Normal

 


gnome-font-viewer-program-gnu-linux-screenshot

Another good tool for GNOME users is font-manager if you don't have it already installed:

 

apt-get install font-manager


One of the cool things about it is it can show you Licensing of each of system installed fonts the full list of font character sets and could visualize you different pixel font sizes in the so called "waterfall" font view.

Change Linux Wireless Access Point connection from text terminal with iwconfig

Monday, October 8th, 2018

wireless-change-wireless-network-to-connect-to-using-console

If you have configured a couple of Wireless connections at home or work on your Laptop  and each of the remote Wi-FI access points are at different distance (some APs are situated at closer range than others) and your Linux OS keeps connecting sometimes to the wrong AP by default you'll perhaps want to change that behavior, so you keep connected to the Wi-Fi AP that has the best Link Quality (is situatated physically at closest location to your laptop integrated wifi card).
Using a Graphical tool such as Gnome Network Manager / Wicd Network Manager or KDE's Network Manager is great and easy way to do it but sometimes if you do upgrade of your GNU / Linux and the upgrade fails and your Graphical Environment GNOME / KDE / OpenBox / Window Maker or whatever Window Manager you use fails to start it is super handy to use text console (terminal) to connect to the right wiki in order to do a deb / rpm package rollback to revert your GUI environment or Xorg to the older working release.

Connection to WPA or WEP protected APs on GNU / Linux on a low level is done by /sbin/iwlist , /sbin/iwconfig and wpa_supplicant

wpasupplicant and network-manager (if you're running Xorg server).

 

/sbin/iwlist scan
 

 

wlp3s0    Scan completed :
          Cell 01 – Address: 10:FE:ED:43:CB:0E
                    Channel:6
                    Frequency:2.437 GHz (Channel 6)
                    Quality=64/70  Signal level=-46 dBm  
                    Encryption key:on
                    ESSID:"Magdanoz"
                    Bit Rates:1 Mb/s; 2 Mb/s; 5.5 Mb/s; 11 Mb/s; 6 Mb/s
                              9 Mb/s; 12 Mb/s; 18 Mb/s
                    Bit Rates:24 Mb/s; 36 Mb/s; 48 Mb/s; 54 Mb/s
                    Mode:Master
                    Extra:tsf=00000032cff7c214
                    Extra: Last beacon: 144ms ago
                    IE: Unknown: 00084D616764616E6F7A
                    IE: Unknown: 010882848B960C121824
                    IE: Unknown: 030106
                    IE: Unknown: 0706555320010B1B
                    IE: Unknown: 2A0100
                    IE: IEEE 802.11i/WPA2 Version 1
                        Group Cipher : TKIP
                        Pairwise Ciphers (2) : CCMP TKIP
                        Authentication Suites (1) : PSK
                    IE: Unknown: 32043048606C

 

iwlist command is used to get more detailed wireless info from a wireless interface (in terminal this command shows you the wifi networks available to connect to and various info such as the type of Wifi network the Wifi Name / network quality Frequency (is it it spreading the wifi signal at 2.4 Ghz or 5 Ghz frequency) etc.

 

# ifconfig interafce_name down

 

For example on my Thinkpad the wifi interface is wlp3s0 to check what is yours do ifconfig -a e.g.

 

root@jeremiah:~# /sbin/ifconfig -a
enp0s25: flags=4099<UP,BROADCAST,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        ether 00:21:cc:cc:b2:27  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0
        device interrupt 20  memory 0xf3900000-f3920000  

 

lo: flags=73<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING>  mtu 65536
        inet 127.0.0.1  netmask 255.0.0.0
        inet6 ::1  prefixlen 128  scopeid 0x10<host>
        loop  txqueuelen 1  (Local Loopback)
        RX packets 350  bytes 28408 (27.7 KiB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 350  bytes 28408 (27.7 KiB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

wlp3s0: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 192.168.0.103  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 192.168.0.255
        inet6 fe80::6267:20ff:fe3c:20ec  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 60:67:20:3c:20:ec  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 299735  bytes 362561115 (345.7 MiB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 1  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 278518  bytes 96996135 (92.5 MiB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

 

Next use iwconfig on Debian / Ubuntu Linux it is part of wireless-tools deb package.

 

root@jeremiah:~# /sbin/iwconfig interface essid "Your-Acess-Point-name"

 

To check whether you're connected to a wireless network you can do:

http://pc-freak.net/images/check-wireless-frequency-access-point-mac-and-wireless-name-iwconfig-linux

root@jeremiah:~# iwconfig
enp0s25   no wireless extensions.

 

lo        no wireless extensions.

wlp3s0    IEEE 802.11  ESSID:"Magdanoz"  
          Mode:Managed  Frequency:2.437 GHz  Access Point: 10:FE:ED:43:CB:0E   
          Bit Rate=150 Mb/s   Tx-Power=15 dBm   
          Retry short limit:7   RTS thr:off   Fragment thr:off
          Encryption key:off
          Power Management:off
          Link Quality=61/70  Signal level=-49 dBm  
          Rx invalid nwid:0  Rx invalid crypt:0  Rx invalid frag:0
          Tx excessive retries:5  Invalid misc:1803   Missed beacon:0


N.B. ! To get a list of all your PC network interfaces you can use cmd:

 

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# ls -al /sys/class/net/
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 .
drwxr-xr-x 52 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 ..
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 enp0s25 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:19.0/net/enp0s25
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 lo -> ../../devices/virtual/net/lo
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 wlp3s0 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.1/0000:03:00.0/net/wlp3s0

show-all-network-interfaces-with-netstat-linux

or use netstat like so:

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# netstat -i | column -t
Kernel   Interface  table
Iface    MTU        RX-OK   RX-ERR  RX-DRP  RX-OVR  TX-OK   TX-ERR  TX-DRP  TX-OVR  Flg
enp0s25  1500       0       0       0       0       0       0       0       0       BMU
lo       65536      590     0       0       0       590     0       0       0       LRU
wlp3s0   1500       428112  0       1       0       423538  0       0       0       BMRU

 


To get only the Wireless network card interface on Linux (e.g. find out which of the listed above interfaces is your wireless adapter's name), use iw command (that shows devices and their configuration):

 

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# iw dev
phy#0
    Interface wlp3s0
        ifindex 3
        wdev 0x1
        addr 60:67:20:3c:20:ec
        type managed
        channel 6 (2437 MHz), width: 40 MHz, center1: 2427 MHz
        txpower 15.00 dBm

 

linux-wireless-terminal-console-check-wireless-interfaces-command

  • If you need to get only the active Wireless adapter device assigned by Linux kernel

 

root@jeremiah:~# iw dev | awk '$1=="Interface"{print $2}'

 

To check the IP / Netmask and Broadcase address assigned by connected Access Point use ifconfig
with your Laptop Wireless Interface Name.

show-extra-information-ip-netmask-broadcast-about-wireless-interface-linux

root@jeremiah:~# /sbin/ifconfig wlp3s0
wlp3s0: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 192.168.0.103  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 192.168.0.255
        inet6 fe80::6267:20ff:fe3c:20ec  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 60:67:20:3c:20:ec  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 319534  bytes 365527097 (348.5 MiB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 1  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 285464  bytes 99082701 (94.4 MiB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0


As you can see in above 3 examples iwconfig could configure various settings regarding the wireless network interface.

It is really annoying because sometimes if you have configured your Linux to connect to multiple access points, the wifi adapter might keep connecting to an access point that is more distanced from you and because of that the Bandwidth might be slower and that could impact your Internet connectivity, to fix that and get rid of any networks that are automatically set to connect to that you don't want to, just delete the correspodning files (the Wifi file name coincides with the Wireless AP network name).
All stored Wi-FI access points that your Linux is configured to connect to are stored inside /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/

For example to delete an auto connection to wireless router with a name NetGear do:

 

root@jeremiah:~# rm -f /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/NetGear

 

For a complete list of stored Wifi Networks that your PC might connect (and authorize to if configured so) do:

 

root@jeremiah:~# ls -a /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/
Magdanoz
NetGear

LinkSys
Cobra
NetIs
WirelessNet

 

After deleting the required Networks you want your computer to not automatically connect to to make NetworkManager aware of that restart it with:
 

hipo@jeremiah:~# systemctl restart NetworkManager.service


or if you hate systemd like I do just use the good old init script to restart:

 

hipo@jeremiah:~# /etc/init.d/network-manager restart


To get some more informatoin on the exact network you're connected, you can run:

show-information-about-wireless-connection-on-gnu-linux

 

hipo@jeremiah:~# systemctl status NetworkManager.service
● NetworkManager.service – Network Manager
   Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/NetworkManager.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Mon 2018-10-08 22:35:09 EEST; 15s ago
     Docs: man:NetworkManager(8)
 Main PID: 13721 (NetworkManager)
    Tasks: 5 (limit: 4915)
   CGroup: /system.slice/NetworkManager.service
           ├─13721 /usr/sbin/NetworkManager –no-daemon
           └─13742 /sbin/dhclient -d -q -sf /usr/lib/NetworkManager/nm-dhcp-helper -pf /var/run/dhclient-wlp3s0.pid -lf /var/lib/NetworkManager/dhclie

 

Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:   [1539027315.6657] dhcp4 (wlp3s0): state changed unknown -> bound
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah dhclient[13742]: bound to 192.168.0.103 — renewal in 2951 seconds.
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6735] device (wlp3s0): state change: ip-config -> ip-check (reason 'none') [70 80
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6744] device (wlp3s0): state change: ip-check -> secondaries (reason 'none') [80 9
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6747] device (wlp3s0): state change: secondaries -> activated (reason 'none') [90
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6749] manager: NetworkManager state is now CONNECTED_LOCAL
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6812] manager: NetworkManager state is now CONNECTED_GLOBAL
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6813] policy: set 'Magdanoz' (wlp3s0) as default for IPv4 routing and DNS
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6816] device (wlp3s0): Activation: successful, device activated.
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6823] manager: startup complete

 

Set mcedit as default text editor for mc (midnight commander) on Linux

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

set-default-text-editor-for-midnight-commander-to-mcedit-linux-howto

If you're a vim (VI Improved) fan and you set your Linux server / desktop to use VIM as a default text editor, for those who don't know this is done either locally for user (if you're not superuser on remote server) by adding:

export VISUAL=vim
export EDITOR="$VISUAL"

to ~/.bashrc or ~/.bash_profile, e.g.

 

echo 'export VISUAL=vim; export EDITOR="$VISUAL"' >> ~/.bashrc
echo 'export VISUAL=vim; export EDITOR="$VISUAL"' >> ~/.bash_profile

 

or if you're root on the system e.g. it is your Linux desktop / administered by you (debian / ubuntu) server to set VIM as default text editor for all applications with cmd:

 

 # update-alternatives –config editor

 

or if you haven't unset the EDITOR variable the default behavior on some Ubuntu (10.10) etc. versions mc editting would edit with nano text editor.

Just like me however you work also regularly with Midnight Commander (mc) the Linux equivalent of good old Norton Commander you might end up with Midnight Commander opening your files with F4 command with VIM text editor instead of the default.

So here is how to change this behavior in order to end up editting with mcedit any edited file via mc:

mc-menu-options-layout-screenshot

1. Press F9 to Activate the top menu.
2. Press o to Select the Option menu.
3. Press c to Open the configuration dialog.
4. Press i to Toggle the use internal edit option.
5. Press s to Save your preferences.

midnight-commander-configure-options-use-internal-edit-screenshot
Hooray, you're done now mc will use mcedit again as default just like it was intended to be in old times on most GNU / Linux distributions.
Enjoy!
 

How to check Debian and Ubuntu version codename

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018

check-linux-os-version-command-howto-check-linux-basic-stuff-lsb_release-command
Once you login to a new server the first thing to do especially if it is a server you never logged in is to check basic things as Kernel version with:

 

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# uname -a;
Linux jeremiah 4.9.0-8-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.9.110-3+deb9u4 (2018-08-21) x86_64 GNU/Linux

 

Check remote server hardware configuration with tools as

 

# dmidecode
# lshw

 

For more check my previous article Get Hardware System Information on Linux

or directly checking things in proc with commands such as:

 

cat /proc/cpuinfo

 

or directly use some custom script such as system_state.sh – 

Next good thing to do is to check Linux install date:

And finally do check the exact codename of Linux on remote server, in the past in many Linux distros this was possible by checking /etc/issue and ./etc/issue.net files, now on Debian based distributions Ubuntu / Debian / Mint this can be achieved with:
 

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID:    Debian
Description:    Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 (stretch)
Release:    9.5
Codename:    stretch

 

Install Java on Debian 9 Linux howto

Saturday, September 29th, 2018

java_on-debian-gnu-linux-oracle-virtual-machine-logo

As most system administrators and perhaps most people :), I dislike Java Virtual Machine. However because of its multi-platform support it is largely adopted and so many things are already written in java, even though I hate it I need it to run things every now and then on my personal desktop machine with Debian Linux 9 (Stretch).

From a programmer point of view Java applications are scalable and flexible and from a point of view a person who had to support computers and servers iwth Java it sucks.
To have a running Java Virtual Machine and run Java applications on your Linux PC you could use JRE (the Java Runtime Environment) and JDK (Java Development Kit) which is a set of Java tools and compilers to translate Java code to a .JAR .WAR and the rest of the Java Machine running formats.
openjdk-free-software-java-implementation-for-linux-bsd

OpenJDK (Open JDK) is free (open source) implementation of Oracle Sun Microsystems of Java SE 7 mostly licensed under GPLv2 (but with some linking to a Java class library that is not truly free. OpenJDK includes as components the backend Virtual Machine (HotSpot), the Java Class Library, javac (the java compiler) and IcedTea (which is Redhat's free implementation of Java Web Start plugin.

Install OpenJDK 8 JDK and JRE

OpenJDK is installable by default on Debian and most other distros, to install it on Debian:

 

linux:~# apt-get install –yes -qq default-jdk
linux:~# apt-get install –yes -qq default-jre

 

That would provide your system with support for  java-sdk, java2-sdk, java5-sdk, java6-sdk, java7-sdk, java8-sdk's free implementation.

 

 

linux:~#  java -version

 

 

linux:~# java version "1.8.0_181"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_181-b13)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.181-b13, mixed mode)

 

 

I have used openjdk but as there are issues with some Java programs because of Java compitability issues. Nowadays most of the timeI choose to usually install the Official Latest Oracle Java 8. The reason is I often have to install on servers application servers such as:

  •  Tomcat
  • JBoss
  • WildFly
  • Jetty
  • Glassfish
  • WebLogic
  • Cassandra
  • Jenkins
     

Install Latest Official Oracle Java 8

java_oracle-virtual-machine-logo

1. Download Oracle Java installable binary

To download latest official release check out Oracle's download page and copy the link to latest Java archive and select the appropriate architecture x64 / 32 bit / arm etc., as of time of writting this article latest Stable Java version is JDK-8U181.

 

linux:~# curl -L -b "oraclelicense=a" -O http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/8u181-b13/96a7b8442fe848ef90c96a2fad6ed6d1/jdk-8u181-linux-x64.tar.gz

 


Notice the -b "oraclelicense=a" which will pass on to the remote web server accept Oracle's license which is a prerequirement to continue to download.

2. Create directory for Java

 

linux:~# mkdir -p /usr/local/oracle-java-8

 

3. Extract the Java .tar.gz to /usr/local/oracle/java-8 or another directory
where java will live

 

linux:~# tar -zxf jdk-8u181-linux-x64.tar.gz -C /usr/local/oracle-java-8

 

If you have used Java OpenJDK beforehand and installed Oracle Java according to the instructions above you might end up with multiple Javas installed by default, however Debian Linux will have a symlinks to java javac (java compiler), javaws (Java web start).
Thus just executed java will return

 

linux:~# java -version

 

java version "1.8.0_181"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_181-b13)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.181-b13, mixed mode)

 

4. Set Oracle Java to be default for the Debian system

 

linux:~# update-alternatives –install "/usr/bin/java" "java" "/usr/local/oracle-java-8/jdk1.8.0_181/bin/java" 1500
linux:~# update-alternatives –install "/usr/bin/javac" "javac" "/usr/local/oracle-java-8/jdk1.8.0_181/bin/javac" 1500
linux:~# update-alternatives –install "/usr/bin/javaws" "javaws" "/usr/local/oracle-java-8/jdk1.8.0_181/bin/javaws" 1500

 

An alternative way to set Java to point to Oracle Java instead of OpenJDK is

 

linux:~# update-alternatives –config java

 

There are 2 choices for the alternative java (providing /usr/bin/java).

 

  Selection    Path                                            Priority   Status
————————————————————
* 0            /usr/local/oracle-java-8/jdk1.8.0_181/bin/java   1500      auto mode
  1            /usr/lib/jvm/java-8-openjdk-amd64/jre/bin/java   1081      manual mode
  2            /usr/local/oracle-java-8/jdk1.8.0_181/bin/java   1500      manual mode

 

Press <enter> to keep the current choice[*], or type selection number:

Install Latest Official Oracle Java 10

To install Oracle Java the process is the same:
 

linux:~# wget –header "Cookie: oraclelicense=accept-securebackup-cookie" <paste the download link here> linux:~# mkdir /usr/local/oracle-java-10/ linux:~# tar xvzf jdk-10.0.1_linux-x64_bin.tar.gz -C/usr/local/oracle-java-10 linux:~# update-alternatives –install "/usr/bin/java" "java" "/usr/local/oracle-java-10/jdk-10.0.1/bin/java" 1500 linux:~# update-alternatives –install "/usr/bin/javac" "javac" "/usr/local/oracle-java-10/jdk-10.0.1/bin/javac" 1500 linux:~# update-alternatives –install "/usr/bin/javaws" "javaws" "/usr/local/oracle-java-10/jdk-10.0.1/bin/javaws" 1500

 

Uninstall OpenJDK previous installation

If you choose to use Oracle Java in favor of OpenJDK you might want to also remove the openjdk not to take space on your Hard disk, to so so:
 

linux:~# apt-get remove default-jre

Change GNOME lock time settings in Linux

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

http://pc-freak.net/images/change-gnome-lock-time-settings-debian-linux-screenshot

In GNOME 3.X The screen lock time setting is set either to 1 minute 15 minutes or NEVER
So what if you would like to,

Set the gnome screen lock settings value to 30 minutes or one Hour

Here is how:

For 30 minutes lock screen setting:

 

linux:~$ gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.session idle-delay 1800

 

Set GNOME lock time to 1 hour

 

linux:~$ gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.session idle-delay 3600

 

The setting is set in seconds so quickest way to calculate is to divide by 60 (seconds), you can calculate easily the time you like with BC (arbitrary precision calculation language) like so:

 

linux:~$ echo '3600/60' | bc
60

 

Lets say you would like to set your screen to lock every 3 hours, the delay value to set in org.gnome.desktop.session would be:

 

linux:~$ echo '3600*3' | bc
10800

 

Once you set the value to a different than the 3 recognized ones would show in GNOME Control Center as Never (depending on the distro).
 

Reset gnome forgotten keyring password – Fix annoying reoccuring keyring password prompt

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

gnome-keyring-password-error-fix-solution-howto-gnupg-error-after-changing-user-password-linux-desktop-user

If you're on Debian Linux and have a user account and you changed the password you might be unpleasantly surprised by a constantly occuring prompt to reinput the keyring stored old password.
You might be wondering how to reset the gnome keyring password to stop that annoying pop-up prompt from bittering your days.
The simplest fix is to delete all stored passwords and reset the keyring stored values. That's in case if you don't have other important passwords saved.

This is done by simply creating a backup of the old keyring just in case if you have something important stored you can do that with:

 

cd ~/.local/share/keyrings/
cp login.keyring login.keyring.backup

 


Then delete the keyring store file:

 

rm  -f ~/.local/share/keyrings/login.keyring

 

Under some GNU / Linux distrubutions such as Linux Mint deleting the keyring file will not work on such an alternative method is to use seahorse (a frontend program to GnuPG (GNU Privacy Guard), that is doing key management  for GNOME desktop users.

 

hipo@jericho:~$ seahorse

 

seahorse-gnu-gpg-and-password-management-gui-tool-gnome-desktop-environment-debian-linux-screenshot
 

For older Linux distributions like Ubuntu 12.10 e.g. in GNOME 2, the correct path to keyring file is ~/.gnome2/keyrings/
 

rm -f ~/.gnome2/keyrings/*

 

 

Linux: GNOME Flashback missing Desktop Icons fix – Hack to add desktop icons via gnome-shell in GNOME 3.28 onwards

Monday, September 24th, 2018

how-to-fix-workaround-gnome-3.30-missing-desktop-icons-on-linux

I just upgraded my notebook fom Debian Stretch 9.5 Linux to Buster (current Testing Debian release). All went fine except I got a lot of headaches because it seems in Buster the GNOME Flashback 3.30 which I use has removed the support for Show Desktop Icons in Nautilus because of some migration reasons of Nautilus to a newer version 4, (hopefully that would be temporary) from gnome-tweak-tool whose package now contains no binary for gnome-tweak-tool, instead an equivalent tool now is called gnome-tweaks and this tool is no longer working under Gnome Flashback but only with GNOME Classic 3.30 and the regular GNOME 3.30 launcher available from gdm3 (the Gnome Display manager).
 

1. Displaying Missing Desktop icons on GNOME version 3.30


The way to display Desktop icons in GNOME 3.28 onwards at the moment of writting this post and the whole issue with the removed handling of Desktop icons in Nautilus is explained well by Carlos Soriano a gnome shell extension developer in his blog post Desktop icons goes beta.

The good guy C. S. wrote  the his desktop icons gnome shell extension which is on github.com
To use it you have to fetch it and enable it by fetching the repo source code to gnome-shell extensions directory:
 

hipo@linux:~$ cd ~/.local/share/gnome-shell/extensions
hipo@linux:~$ git clone https://gitlab.gnome.org/World/ShellExtensions/desktop-icons
hipo@linux:~$ mkdir 'desktop-icons@csoriano'
hipo@linux:~$ mv desktop-icons/* 'desktop-icons@csoriano'/
hipo@linux:~$ rm -rf desktop-icons/


Now you should use the gnome-tweaks command tool to enable the new added gnome-shell extension.

 

 

hipo@linux:~$ gnome-tweaks


gnome-tweak-on-debian-testing-linux-screenshot

Once enabled your Desktop icons will appear as usual as seen in below shot, the downside this solutions is icons as seen in below screenshot is that pictures doesn't have Thumbnail pictures generated … and icons when kept on with mouse over can move only in a selected square like perimeter (when moved left / right / up down side). That "woody" icon movement sucks a bit but much better than no icons at all.

gnome-3.30-general-desktop-solved-missing-icons-desktop-screenshot-on-debian-linux

 

2. Displaying Missing Desktop icons in GNOME Flashback 3.30

 

I really love GNOME Flashback as it used to be a good replacement for Linux MATE (which is the fork of GNOME2 and not bad but lacks Metacity Window Manager and some of the Eye Candy that GNOME 3 and beside that even MATE had to be slightly hacked to make look more like Classical GNOME 2 – for more on that check my previous article Fixing Mate Adwaita Theme problems on Debian and Ubuntu). 

At the moment when I tried to run gnome-tweaks under a GNOME Flashback session I got the following error:

 

hipo@jericho:~/.local/share/gnome-shell/extensions$ gnome-tweaks 
WARNING : Shell not installed or running
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/gtweak/app.py", line 30, in do_activate
    self.win = Window(self, model)
  File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/gtweak/tweakview.py", line 38, in __init__
    self._model.load_tweaks(self)
  File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/gtweak/tweakmodel.py", line 104, in load_tweaks
    mods = __import__("gtweak.tweaks", globals(), locals(), tweak_files, 0)
  File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/gtweak/tweaks/tweak_group_general.py", line 14, in <module>
    _shell_not_ubuntu = _shell.mode != 'ubuntu'
AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'mode'

 

In regular GNOME session gnome-tweaks works fine and with the help of an GNOME Shell Extension addon it is possible to add the Missing Desktop icons however the only working fix for GNOME FlashBack 3.30 is to substitute nautilus (the default GNOME file manager) with NEMO (which is The Official file manager for Cinnamon Desktop Environment).
Thanksfully this is done relatively easy and all I had to do is to use a little "hack", e.g. install nemo.

 

root@linux:~# apt-get install –yes -qq nemo

 

And add a new auto-launcher for gnome that launches nemo file manager instead of nautilus.

To add the auto-launcher in GNOME I had to add a file with following content:

 

[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
Name=Nemo
Comment=Start Nemo desktop at log in
Exec=nemo-desktop
OnlyShowIn=GNOME;
AutostartCondition=GSettings org.nemo.desktop show-desktop-icons
X-GNOME-AutoRestart=true
NoDisplay=true

 

to ~/.config/autostart/

For those who don't know GNOME has this handy way to set an autostart programs by using the specific .desktop extension files that have to be placed under $HOME/.config/autostart (where $HOME = the logged in user home directory).

The one liner to do so is:

 

echo '[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
Name=Nemo
Comment=Start Nemo desktop at log in
Exec=nemo-desktop
OnlyShowIn=GNOME;
AutostartCondition=GSettings org.nemo.desktop show-desktop-icons
X-GNOME-AutoRestart=true
NoDisplay=true' >> ~/.config/autostart/nemo.desktop

 

Then I had to restart my GNOME FlashBack session (e.g. Log Out and Login with a new session) and the icons appeared.

classic-gnome-flashback-debian-gnu-linux-hipos-desktop-screenshot

The downside of this dirty workaround is that desktop icons even though showing up couldn't be moved (rearranged) freely on any location of desktop (are pretty much static) and the even worser  fact about this hack is you can't actually copy paste easily copy files from your Desktop within another desktop folder … 
 I know that's shitty but at the moment there is no better solution and this is better than nothing at all.

 

P.S. I tried downgrading my Debian Testing to Stable Stretch Linux again with the idea to use the old GNOME 3.22 that the Stable Debian distro provides but, ended up with a lot of mess after experimenting to downgrade using /etc/apt/preferences file records and substitution in /etc/apt/sources.list to include the stable .deb repository and apt dselect and aptitude package management tools. Officially downgrades are not encouraged and supported by Debian, but I hoped I could relatively easily do it by manually fixing the broken dependencies after removing debian packages manually combined with short for bash loops like I did in the past, but it seems this time I broke the system worse, so I could hardly return it back to normal operation in upgrading packages with a lot of manual hacking with apt-get and few one liner scripts. Thus I abandoned as a fix the possiiblity to downgrade Testing Debian to stable, I even considered switching from GNOME desktop environment to something more light as OpenBoxCinnamon / XFCE and gave them one more try but the results weren't nice, I reconsidered again to go back to using the Good Old GNU Step Window Maker as a GNOME alternative which in my opinion is still a great GUI environment for security crackers / sysadmins /hackers (programmers) and eventually perhaps I will switch back to using it, because GNOME is becoming more and more bloated with the years and I can hardly stand it … I mean I did not expected GNOME to be developed in the shitty Mobile Interface  (Unity) way, I have been a loyal user to GNOME for so many years and have lived trhough  all its mess over the years, its painful to see how the good and efficient GNOME 2 went the bad broken road of changing completely concepts and interface in GNOME 3.x
 

3. Closure

GNOME Desktop icons has been with GNOME users already for about 15+ years so IMHO the missing ability to add them easily through gnome tweak tool or Gnome Control Center is a absurd stupidity and killed at least 5 times out of my time to solve and the solution is far from good … I understand that in future the GNOME developers want to make GNOME as modular as possible through GNOME Shell Extensions however if you're removing such an important functionality that's for ages in most mainstream operating systems such as M$ Windows / Mac OS is an insanity. Through my quick research online I found the Missing Desktop Icons is experienced by other people on other Linux distros besides Debian I saw complains by Ubuntu / Fedora and Arch Linux users in forums and mailing lists.
What puzzles me why the reaction of such a major complained are not seriously considered by GNOME developers, especially after all the problems with transition from GNOME 2 -> GNOME 3 which already pushed a lot of GNOME users to move from GNOME to KDE / MATE  (like in Linux Mint whose GUI is based on Linux Mint). Definitely such a general issues would drive further enthusiasts from GNU / Linux and makes a great harm to the Free Software software community.
Hopefully the missing desktop icons hell will be solved in upcoming GNOME releases.

Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge as an External monitor with Debian Linux on Thinkpad T420 / How to use ThinkCentre Edge as external display on Linux

Saturday, September 22nd, 2018

thinkcentre-use-as-external-monitor-on-debian-gnu-linux-ubuntu

Here is a case I bring my Thinkpad T420 notebook to office place and there was plenty of monitors free but all were quite modern and had support only for Display Port / DVI and HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface), e.g. there was no Monitor to support regular VGA port …

 I've conntected my Debian 9 Stretch Linux with a DisplayPort cable to one of the LG monitors but the external monitor video screen did not raised the screen kept  black just like nothing is connected to it.

So i did a quick research online to see whether and how I can make the display port on Lenovo thinkpad t420 work with Linux after consulting few resources online e.g. Hacksr Display Port on Thinkpad T420 and Nvidia Optimus  this post in Ubuntu Forums as well as the official documentation about DisplayPort and Linux on Thinkpad's official documentation ThinkWiki it turned out the T420 Thinkpads have issues with Displayport and Linux and the only solution proposed was to use the second Nvidia Optimus card instead of the integrated display adapter, I however am not sure whether my notebook have this Nvidia at all and did not have time for too much hacking to make it work.

I decided to take a more simple approach and try to use the good old school VGA port protocol with one of the 2 ThinkCentre Edge  m93z stations that were hanging around in the office, in case you never heard of ThinkCentre Edge this is (an integrated computer and monitor in a thin display a kind of cheap PC alternative from Lenovo to iMacs (all in one Macintosh Desktop computer) .

ThinkCentre_Edge_computer-in-monitor-desktop-like-iMac-from_Lenovo

I saw some skeptical looks from colleagues but I with my usual stubborness gave it a try and after a bit of quick research I got it working on Linux ! 🙂
 

If you're wondering whether THINKCENTRE Edge can be used with VGA port as External Display to a Linux powered Laptop the Answer is YES  !!! 🙂


To make it working, 
All you have to do it is configure it as External display from ThinkCentre (OSD) display menu. 

thinkcentre-menus-osd-menu-screenshot

But wait the joy was not so full, even though the ThinkCentre displayed my GNOME FlashBack background picture on its screen it did not show my actual GNOME Menus (Application, Places and Desktop) just like shown in below screenshot ..

Debian-9-1-Stretch-Linux-background-default-picture

I could see fine the ThinkCentre monitor showing normally in xrandr command which is the tool to always check first if you're new on Linux and want to check settings regarding your Notebook display settings / Desktop PC exnternal display settings on Linux , the output of  xrandr is below.
 

hipo@jericho:~$ xrandr

 

Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1024 x 768, maximum 4096 x 4096 LVDS1 connected 1024x768+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 0mm x 0mm 1920x1200 60.0 +   1600x1200 60.0   1680x1050 60.0   1280x1024 76.0 75.0 72.0 60.0   1440x900 75.0 59.9   1152x864 75.0 1024x768 60.0*+ 800x600 60.3 56.2 640x480 59.9 VGA1 connected 1024x768+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 519mm x 324mm 1920x1200 60.0 + 1600x1200 60.0 1680x1050 60.0 1280x1024 76.0 75.0 72.0 60.0 1440x900 75.0 59.9 1152x864 75.0 1024x768 75.1 70.1 60.0* 832x624 74.6 800x600 72.2 75.0 60.3 640x480 72.8 75.0 66.7 60.0 720x400 70.1

I also gave a try to arandr which is a simple GUI interface to xrandr, i.e.:
 

root@jericho:~# apt-get install –yes -qq arandr
root@jericho:~# exit
hipo@jericho:~$  arandr


arandr-debian-gnu-linux-screenshot

Unfortunately trying to turn on / off the VGA monitor shown in above screenshot using arandr and saving did not produced any positive results, as the ThinkCentre Edge used as external monitor kept being showing only my Debian Linux background.

During my attempts to make it working I stumbled upon driconf a configuration applet program for Direct Rendering Infrastructure (DRI).

driconf-screenshot-linux

 

 

I also gave a try to default gnome-control-center Monitor settings tool but I couldn't turn off the notebook display in order to make the ThinkCentre Edge my primary display.

Finally after some more investigation online, I found how to switch on my Notebook display by running below xrandr command
 

xrandr –output LVDS-1 –off


Just in case if you need to re-enable (on) the LVDS-1 use 

 

xrandr -d :0 –output LVDS –auto​

Run custom user script after reboot with a cronjob on Linux

Friday, September 21st, 2018

howto-add-custom-script-on-reboot-with-non-administrative-root-user-on-gnu-linux

Perhaps you have a websites on a server on some Linux distro / FreeBSD / AIX / HP-UX / Sun OS that uses Vixie-cron cron jobs to run / respawn dead php / python perl scripts etc.  that do stuff on the server every lets say 30 minutes an hour or even every 12 / 24 hours in the background.
But sometimes due to server or Linux kernel upgrades you need to reboot the server with reboot command or shutdown -r now right in the minutes the scripts were supposed to run and do a database backup / synchronize some data with a remote MySQL with replication configured or do some site maintenance job such as clearing old Messages / Spam / data log file records.

Of course one possible workaround to that is to add the non-root user scripts in question  to /etc/rc.local to run on every server boot, but that fix requires a root access and very often developers did not have that, neither sysadmins are willing to bother  add a user sudo-ed scripts e.g. add  (sudo -u whateveruser "/path/to/script") to /etc/rc.local.

Run custom user  script after reboot the cron way

Happily there is ctually a better cron way to do that by telling crond to execute a cronjob during boot and assuming the non-admin user on the Linux has access to shell and access to using cron jobs by using @reboot cron direcive.

Here is few examples on how to run a re-run cron job on start up:
 

linux:~$ crontab -e


Some editor as nano or vim will open listing all your previous set system jobs to add scripts phpjob.php

@reboot  /user/dir/path/to/phpjob
@reboot  /path/to/shell_script
@reboot  /path/to/linux-command

That's pretty shitty situation but thanksfully remote access of website username with SSH will be enough to set the right cron activity (of course this can't be made for servers that are missing crond service running.

The scripts set in cron job that way will respawn right after the OS system had booted and there will be no need for them to wait the next hour to execute configured data synch.
For more on how to run a tiny script respawn every second using a single cron job check out my previous article How to set a crontab to execute commands on a seconds time interval on GNU / Linux and FreeBSD.

Historically it is interestingly to mention that in times before systemd appeared in modern Linux distributions,
a cool thack to run a script that had to be respawned every second after boot for a privileged user was to use /etc/inittab (no longer available in most all non System V Linux distrubutions in 2018), to do so
if you happen to still administer some old Linux servers CentOS 7 etc. you and you need to add a custom script to run and respawn all the time by including a line in /etc/inittab (again assuming a System V Linux is on remote machine):
 

mysvc:235:respawn:/home/me/bin/my_service_starter_script

Putting a service to respawn in that way via inittab uses init (process) and the kernel and keeps re-running it.

Note: 

If a command fails when it starts, and init is configured to restart it, it will use a lot of system resources: init starts it, it fails, init starts it, it fails, init starts it, it fails, and so on, ad infinitum. To prevent this, init will keep track of how often it restarts a command, and if the frequency grows to high, it will delay for five minutes before restarting again.If the kernel 
Using inittab should always be tested on a testbed before adding to remote server, note that if the script is using a lot of memory and keeps crashing it can easily leave out the kernel without memory and the system is about to get errors like:
 

process respawning too fast 

 

Another useful thing if you have doubts that the script might be crashing is to use something like monit to monitor the script (assuming the script does provide some kind of tcp / udp connection on port) and report you via email / sms about issues with crashing script.
If you hear monit the first time I recommend you read my previous article Monitoring and restart server services (Apache, Mysql, Bind) with Monit to prevent server downtimes.