Archive for the ‘Nginx’ Category

Run multiple PHP versions (PHP 5 and PHP 7) with NGINX on the same server howto

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018

how-to-run-multiple-php-versions-on-same-Linux-server-nginx-webserver-php5-7-logo

It is common sysadmin task to have two versions of PHP running on the same physical or Virtual server to be able to run simultaneously old PHP 5.X legacy applications and PHP 7.X written websites / web applications.

In the past this task was much more complicated than today  you had to compile for example Apache and PHP modules from source and enable it through fastcgi.
Today with the raise of NGINX Web Server and its possibility to run much of the PHP Apps running on top of Apache.
For the sake of this tutorial I'll be using Debian Strecth 9.0.
The reason to use NGINX instead of Apache for this tutorial are numerous, it is light weight (uses less resources – CPU ./ Memory) it is secure smaller in size.
 

1. Install NGINX Web Server

 

# apt-get install –yes nginx 

 

2. Install PHP.7.0 FPM module

 

# apt-get install php7.0-cli php7.0-fpm
 

 

3. Install PHP 5.6 FPM Using external deb repository

Debian default repositories does not include support for PHP 5.6, hence we need to add the respective repositories providing PHP 5.6

 

# apt-get install apt-transport-https

 

# curl https://packages.sury.org/php/apt.gpg | apt-key add –
echo 'deb https://packages.sury.org/php/ stretch main' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/deb.sury.org.list
apt-get update

 

Next install PHP 5.6 from just added repos

 

# apt-get install –yes php5.6-cli php5.6-fpm

 

4. Check Multiple PHP versions PHP 5 and PHP 7 aree properly installed 

 

# php7.0 -v
PHP 7.0.15-1 (cli)
# php5.6 -v

 

Debian has a default set-up for PHP CLI (Console Interface command) pointing to PHP 7.0, e.g.

 

# php -v
PHP 7.0.15-1 (cli)

 

If you prefer to use as prefer PHP 5.6 instead you can do it with debian update-alternative cmd:

 

# update-alternatives –config php

 

5. Configure both installed PHP -es

Edit /etc/php/7.0/fpm/pool.d/www.conf and look for the listen option. It should equal to /run/php/php7.0-fpm.sock or something alike.
Now do the same for 5.6, it should contain the same with just 5.6 instead of 7.0. Note that it could also be a bind address, i.e. IP address with port (which is performance-wise more suitable for production than sockets). 

 

6. Configuring NGINX webserver


Nginx configuration files are stored in /etc/nginx 

– On Debian the .deb package structure of nginx is is made that all available virtual hosts for nginx just like for Apache are stored  in sites-available directory and production enabled virtualhosts are symlinks to sites-enabled

– Shared configuration for reuse among multiple domains is stored in inside the snippets directory

– fastcgi.conf file contains FastCGI specific variables that are passed to PHP

– The snippets/fastcgi-php.conf is just a helper file to prepare configuration that is passed to PHP module

It is a good idea to remove any unnecessery configuration from /etc/nginx/sites-enabled 
 

7. Create configuration for PHP 7.0


To make simple the test the main (root) directory of nginx will be set to have a simple phpinfo(); file.
 

mkdir /var/www/site-with-php7
echo -e '<?php\nphpinfo();' > /var/www/site-with-php7/index.php 


Then create actual Nginx configuration

 

# vim /etc/nginx/sites-available/site-with-enabed-php7.X

 

server {
    listen 8770 default_server;
    listen [::]:8870 default_server;

    server_name _;
    root /var/www/site-with-php7;
    index index.php;
    location / {
        include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf;
        fastcgi_pass unix:/run/php/php7.0-fpm.sock; # adjust for the listen setting discussed above
    }


As seen from configuration PHP 7 will be serving PHP scripts written for php 7  on TCP port 8870

 

8. Create configuration for PHP 5.6

 

# mkdir /var/www/site-with-php5.6
# echo -e '<?php\nphpinfo();' > /var/www/site-with-php5.6/index.php

 

server {
    listen 8756 default_server;
    listen [::]:8856 default_server;

    server_name _;
    root /var/www/site-with-php5.6;
    index index.php;
    location / {
        include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf;
        fastcgi_pass unix:/run/php/php5.6-fpm.sock; # adjust for the listen setting discussed above
    }
}

As you see from configuration PHP 5.6 will be serving PHP 5.6 files on TCP port 8756

To enable both NGINX configurations to load enable both nginx vhosts as there is no a2ensite like for enabling NGINX configurations the following  cmd does it
 

# ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/site-with-php5.6 /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/
#  ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/site-with-php7.0 /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/

To load the new NGINX Virtualhost configurations, restart next:
 

# systemctl reload nginx.service

 

9. Testing NGINX + PHP configuration set-up on port 8870 / 8876

 


– Test NGINX connection on 8876
 

lynx -dump http://localhost:8870

– Test NGINX connection on 8870
 

lynx -dump http://localhost:8870

Both commands should dump you output from PHP 7 (if your server lacks lynx i warmly recommend it, though you can use wget to test).

 

To sum it up


Even though generally it is a bad idea to have 2 instances of application service be it NGINX / Apache from security point of view, it is sometimes a necessity especially when you
or your customers are unwilling to invest money for upgrade of their websites / application infrastructure and if the clients want to keep obsolete PHP code and mix it with a new.
Still migration will be required as you would perhaps want to have some kind of Load Balancer round robin with another NGINX / Apache or Haproxy to make different applications
open under a separate CDN hostname
.

Nginx increase security by putting websites into Linux jails howto

Monday, August 27th, 2018

linux-jail-nginx-webserver-increase-security-by-putting-it-and-its-data-into-jail-environment

If you're sysadmining a large numbers of shared hosted websites which use Nginx Webserver to interpret PHP scripts and serve HTML, Javascript, CSS … whatever data.

You realize the high amount of risk that comes with a possible successful security breach / hack into a server by a malicious cracker. Compromising Nginx Webserver by an intruder automatically would mean that not only all users web data will get compromised, but the attacker would get an immediate access to other data such as Email or SQL (if the server is running multiple services).

Nowadays it is not so common thing to have a multiple shared websites on the same server together with other services, but historically there are many legacy servers / webservers left which host some 50 or 100+ websites.

Of course the best thing to do is to isolate each and every website into a separate Virtual Container however as this is a lot of work and small and mid-sized companies refuse to spend money on mostly anything this might be not an option for you.

Considering that this might be your case and you're running Nginx either as a Load Balancing, Reverse Proxy server etc. , even though Nginx is considered to be among the most secure webservers out there, there is absolutely no gurantee it would not get hacked and the server wouldn't get rooted by a script kiddie freak that just got in darknet some 0day exploit.

To minimize the impact of a possible Webserver hack it is a good idea to place all websites into Linux Jails.

linux-jail-simple-explained-diagram-chroot-jail

For those who hear about Linux Jail for a first time,
chroot() jail is a way to isolate a process / processes and its forked children from the rest of the *nix system. It should / could be used only for UNIX processes that aren't running as root (administrator user), because of the fact the superuser could break out (escape) the jail pretty easily.

Jailing processes is a concept that is pretty old that was first time introduced in UNIX version 7 back in the distant year 1979, and it was first implemented into BSD Operating System ver. 4.2 by Bill Joy (a notorious computer scientist and co-founder of Sun Microsystems). Its original use for the creation of so called HoneyPot – a computer security mechanism set to detect, deflect, or, in some manner, counteract attempts at unauthorized use of information systems that appears completely legimit service or part of website whose only goal is to track, isolate, and monitor intruders, a very similar to police string operations (baiting) of the suspect. It is pretty much like а bait set to collect the fish (which in this  case is the possible cracker).

linux-chroot-jail-environment-explained-jailing-hackers-and-intruders-unix

BSD Jails nowadays became very popular as iPhones environment where applications are deployed are inside a customly created chroot jail, the principle is exactly the same as in Linux.

But anyways enough talk, let's create a new jail and deploy set of system binaries for our Nginx installation, here is the things you will need:

1. You need to have set a directory where a copy of /bin/ls /bin/bash /bin/,  /bin/cat … /usr/bin binaries /lib and other base system Linux system binaries copy will reside.

 

server:~# mkdir -p /usr/local/chroot/nginx

 


2. You need to create the isolated environment backbone structure /etc/ , /dev, /var/, /usr/, /lib64/ (in case if deploying on 64 bit architecture Operating System).

 

server:~# export DIR_N=/usr/local/chroot/nginx;
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/etc
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/dev
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/var
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/usr
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/usr/local/nginx
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/tmp
server:~# chmod 1777 $DIR_N/tmp
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/var/tmp
server:~# chmod 1777 $DIR_N/var/tmp
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/lib64
server:~# mkdir -p $DIR_N/usr/local/

 

3. Create required device files for the new chroot environment

 

server:~# /bin/mknod -m 0666 $D/dev/null c 1 3
server:~# /bin/mknod -m 0666 $D/dev/random c 1 8
server:~# /bin/mknod -m 0444 $D/dev/urandom c 1 9

 

mknod COMMAND is used instead of the usual /bin/touch command to create block or character special files.

Once create the permissions of /usr/local/chroot/nginx/{dev/null, dev/random, dev/urandom} have to be look like so:

 

server:~# ls -l /usr/local/chroot/nginx/dev/{null,random,urandom}
crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 3 Aug 17 09:13 /dev/null
crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 8 Aug 17 09:13 /dev/random
crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 9 Aug 17 09:13 /dev/urandom

 

4. Install nginx files into the chroot directory (copy all files of current nginx installation into the jail)
 

If your NGINX webserver installation was installed from source to keep it latest
and is installed in lets say, directory location /usr/local/nginx you have to copy /usr/local/nginx to /usr/local/chroot/nginx/usr/local/nginx, i.e:

 

server:~# /bin/cp -varf /usr/local/nginx/* /usr/local/chroot/nginx/usr/local/nginx

 


5. Copy necessery Linux system libraries to newly created jail
 

NGINX webserver is compiled to depend on various libraries from Linux system root e.g. /lib/* and /lib64/* therefore in order to the server work inside the chroot-ed environment you need to transfer this libraries to the jail folder /usr/local/chroot/nginx

If you are curious to find out which libraries exactly is nginx binary dependent on run:

server:~# ldd /usr/local/nginx/usr/local/nginx/sbin/nginx

        linux-vdso.so.1 (0x00007ffe3e952000)
        libpthread.so.0 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpthread.so.0 (0x00007f2b4762c000)
        libcrypt.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypt.so.1 (0x00007f2b473f4000)
        libpcre.so.3 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpcre.so.3 (0x00007f2b47181000)
        libcrypto.so.0.9.8 => /usr/local/lib/libcrypto.so.0.9.8 (0x00007f2b46ddf000)
        libz.so.1 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so.1 (0x00007f2b46bc5000)
        libc.so.6 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6 (0x00007f2b46826000)
        /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00007f2b47849000)
        libdl.so.2 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libdl.so.2 (0x00007f2b46622000)


The best way is to copy only the libraries in the list from ldd command for best security, like so:

 

server: ~# cp -rpf /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libthread.so.0 /usr/local/chroot/nginx/lib/*
server: ~# cp -rpf library chroot_location

etc.

 

However if you're in a hurry (not a recommended practice) and you don't care for maximum security anyways (you don't worry the jail could be exploited from some of the many lib files not used by nginx and you don't  about HDD space), you can also copy whole /lib into the jail, like so:

 

server: ~# cp -rpf /lib/ /usr/local/chroot/nginx/usr/local/nginx/lib

 

NOTE! Once again copy whole /lib directory is a very bad practice but for a time pushing activities sometimes you can do it …


6. Copy /etc/ some base files and ld.so.conf.d , prelink.conf.d directories to jail environment
 

 

server:~# cp -rfv /etc/{group,prelink.cache,services,adjtime,shells,gshadow,shadow,hosts.deny,localtime,nsswitch.conf,nscd.conf,prelink.conf,protocols,hosts,passwd,ld.so.cache,ld.so.conf,resolv.conf,host.conf}  \
/usr/local/chroot/nginx/usr/local/nginx/etc

 

server:~# cp -avr /etc/{ld.so.conf.d,prelink.conf.d} /usr/local/chroot/nginx/nginx/etc


7. Copy HTML, CSS, Javascript websites data from the root directory to the chrooted nginx environment

 

server:~# nice -n 10 cp -rpf /usr/local/websites/ /usr/local/chroot/nginx/usr/local/


This could be really long if the websites are multiple gigabytes and million of files, but anyways the nice command should reduce a little bit the load on the server it is best practice to set some kind of temporary server maintenance page to show on the websites index in order to prevent the accessing server clients to not have interrupts (that's especially the case on older 7200 / 7400 RPM non-SSD HDDs.)
 

 

8. Stop old Nginx server outside of Chroot environment and start the new one inside the jail


a) Stop old nginx server

Either stop the old nginx using it start / stop / restart script inside /etc/init.d/nginx (if you have such installed) or directly kill the running webserver with:

 

server:~# killall -9 nginx

 

b) Test the chrooted nginx installation is correct and ready to run inside the chroot environment

 

server:~# /usr/sbin/chroot /usr/local/chroot/nginx /usr/local/nginx/nginx/sbin/nginx -t
server:~# /usr/sbin/chroot /usr/local/chroot/nginx /usr/local/nginx/nginx/sbin/nginx

 

c) Restart the chrooted nginx webserver – when necessery later

 

server:~# /usr/sbin/chroot /nginx /usr/local/chroot/nginx/sbin/nginx -s reload

 

d) Edit the chrooted nginx conf

If you need to edit nginx configuration, be aware that the chrooted NGINX will read its configuration from /usr/local/chroot/nginx/nginx/etc/conf/nginx.conf (i'm saying that if you by mistake forget and try to edit the old config that is usually under /usr/local/nginx/conf/nginx.conf

 

 

Protect NGINX webserver with password – Nginx basic HTTP htaccess authentication

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Protect-nginx-webserver-with-password_migrate_apache_password_protect_to_Nginx_basic_HTTP_htaccess_authentication
If you're migrating a website from Apache Webserver to Nginx to boost performance and better Utilize your servers hardware and the websites (Virtualhosts) has sections with implemented Apache .htaccess / .htaccess password authentication, you will have to migrate also Apache directory password protection to Nginx.

This is not a hard task as NginX's password protection uses same password format as Apache and Nginx password protection files are generated with standard htpasswd part of apache2-utils package (on Debian / Ubuntu servers) and httpd-tools on CentOS / Fedora / RHEL. If you're migrating the Apache websites to Nginx on a fresh new installed server and website developers are missing htpasswd tool to install it depending on Linux distro:

On Debian / Ubuntu deb based servers, install htpasswd with:

apt-get install –yes apache2-utils


On CentOS / Fedora … other RPM based servers:

 

yum -y install httpd-tools

Once installed if you need to protect new section site still being in development with password with Nginx, do it as usual with htpasswd
 

htpasswd -c /home/site/nginx-websitecom/.htpaswd admin


Note that if .htpasswd file has already exist and has other user records, to not overwritted multiple users / passes and  let all users in file login to Nginx HTTP auth with separate passwords, do:

htpasswd /var/www/nginx-websietcom/.htpasswd elijah


Now open config file of Nginx Vhost and modify it to include configuration like this:

 

server {
       listen 80;
       server_name www.nginx-website.com nginx-website.com;
       root /var/www/www.nginx-website.com/www;
[…]
       location /test {
                auth_basic "Restricted";
                auth_basic_user_file /var/www/www.example.com/.htpasswd;
       }
[…]
}


Do it for as many Vhosts as you have and to make the new settings take affect restart Nginx:

/etc/init.d/nginx restart

Enjoy 🙂

Fix to “413 Request Entity Too Large” error in Nginx webserver and what causes it

Friday, November 14th, 2014

nginx_413_request_entity_too_large-fix

If you administer NGINX caching server serving static files content and redirecting some requests to Apache and you end up with errors when uploading big files (using HTTP PUT method), even though in Apache's PHP  upload_max_filesize is set to relatively high number upload_max_filesize = 60M.

Here is what happens during hand shake of web-browser -> server interaction 'till status is returned:
 

Web browser or Webcrawler robot goes through the following phases while talking to Web server:

 

1. Obtain an IP address from the IP name of the site (base on site URL without the leading 'http://'). 
This is provided by domain name servers (DNSs) configured for PC.
2. Open an IP socket connection to that IP address.
3. Write an HTTP data stream through that socket
(4) Receive an HTTP data stream back from the Web server in response. 
This data stream contains status codes whose values are determined by the HTTP protocol
whether successful. 

 

In the case the is recognized and reported to client 'web browser', causing the error.

The fix is to also increase max file upload limit in NGINX this is done via:
 
client_max_body_size variable in /usr/local/nginx/nginx.conf (or /etc/nginx/nginx.conf whether Nginx is installed from package).
Here is extract from nginx.conf

http {
    include       mime.types;
    default_type  application/octet-stream;
    sendfile        on;
    keepalive_timeout  65;

 

    server {
        client_max_body_size 60M;
        listen       80;
        server_name  localhost;

        # Main location
        location / {
            proxy_pass         http://127.0.0.1:8000/;
        }
    }
}


To make new configuration active Restart Nginx:

/etc/init.d/nginx restart

Disable php notice logging / stop variable warnings in error.log on Apache / Nginx / Lighttpd

Monday, July 28th, 2014

disable_php_notice_warnings_logging_in-apache-nginx-lighttpd
At one of companies where I administrate few servers, we are in process of optimizing the server performance to stretch out the maximum out of server hardware and save money from unnecessery hardware costs and thus looking for ways to make server performance better.

On couple of web-sites hosted on few of the production servers, administrating, I've noticed dozens of PHP Notice errors, making the error.log quickly grow to Gigabytes and putting useless hard drive I/O overhead. Most of the php notice warnings are caused by unitialized php variables.

I'm aware having an unitialized values is a horrible security hole, however the websites are running fine even though the notice warnings and currently the company doesn't have the necessery programmers resource to further debug and fix all this undefined php vars, thus what happens is monthly a couple of hundreds megabytes of useless same php notice warnings are written in error.log.

That  error.log errors puts an extra hardship for awstats which is later generating server access statistics while generating the 404 errors statistics and thus awstats script has to read and analyze huge files with plenty of records which doesn't have nothing to do with 404 error

We found this PHP Notice warnings logged is one of the things we can optimize had to be disabled.

Here is how this is done:
On the servers running Debian Wheezy stable to disable php notices.

I had to change in /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini error_reporting variable.

Setting was to log everything (including PHP critical errors, warning and notices) like so:
 

vi /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini

error_reporting = E_ALL & ~E_DEPRECATED

to

error_reporting = E_COMPILE_ERROR|E_ERROR|E_CORE_ERROR


On CentOS, RHEL, SuSE based servers, edit instead /etc/php.ini.

This setting makes Apache to only log in error.log critical errors, php core dump (thread) errors and php code compilation (interpretation errors)

To make settings take affect on Debian host Apache webserver:

/etc/init.d/apache2 restart

On CentOS, RHEL Linux, had to restart Apache with:

/etc/init.d/httpd restart

For other servers running Nginx and Lighttpd webservers, after changing php.ini:

service nginx reload
service lighttpd restart

To disable php notices errors only on some websites, where .htaccess enabled, you can use also place in website DocumentRoot .htaccess:
 

php_value error_reporting 2039


Other way to disable via .htaccess is by adding to it code:
 

php_flag display_errors off


Also for hosted websites on some of the servers, where .htaccess is disabled, enabling / disabling php notices can be easily triggered by adding following php code to index.php

define('DEBUG', true);

if(DEBUG == true)
{
    ini_set('display_errors', 'On');
    error_reporting(E_ALL);
}
else
{
    ini_set('display_errors', 'Off');
    error_reporting(0);
}

 

Fun with Apache / Nginx Webserver log – Visualize webserver access log in real time

Friday, July 18th, 2014

visualize-graphically-web-server-access-log-logstalgia-nginx-apache-log-visualize-in-gnu-linux-and-windows
If you're working in a hosting company and looking for a graphical way to Visualize access to your Linux webservers – (Apache, Nginx, Lighttpd) you will be happy to learn about Logstalgia's existence. Logstalgia is very useful if you need to convince your Boss / company clients that the webservers are exceeding the CPU / Memory hardware limits physically servers can handle. Even if you don't have to convince anyone of anything logstalgia is cool to run if you want to impress a friend and show off your 1337 4Dm!N Sk!11Z 🙂 Nostalgia is much more pleasent way to keep an eye on your Webserver log files in real time better than (tail -f)

The graphical output of nostalgia is a pong-like battle game between webserver and never ending chain of web requests.

This is the official website description of Logstalgia:
 

Logstalgia is a website traffic visualization that replays web-server access logs as a pong-like battle between the web server and an never ending torrent of requests. Requests appear as colored balls (the same color as the host) which travel across the screen to arrive at the requested location. Successful requests are hit by the paddle while unsuccessful ones (eg 404 – File Not Found) are missed and pass through. The paths of requests are summarized within the available space by identifying common path prefixes. Related paths are grouped together under headings. For instance, by default paths ending in png, gif or jpg are grouped under the heading Images. Paths that don’t match any of the specified groups are lumped together under a Miscellaneous section.


To install Logstalgia on Debian / Ubuntu Linux there is a native package, so to install it run the usual:

apt-get --yes install logstalgia

Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
The following NEW packages will be installed:
  logstalgia
0 upgraded, 1 newly installed, 0 to remove and 4 not upgraded.
Need to get 161 kB of archives.
After this operation, 1,102 kB of additional disk space will be used.
Get:1 http://mirrors.kernel.org/debian/ stable/main logstalgia amd64 1.0.0-1+b1 [161 kB]
Fetched 161 kB in 2s (73.9 kB/s)
Selecting previously deselected package logstalgia.
(Reading database ... 338532 files and directories currently installed.)
Unpacking logstalgia (from .../logstalgia_1.0.0-1+b1_amd64.deb) ...
Processing triggers for man-db ...
Setting up logstalgia (1.0.0-1+b1) ...


Logstalgia is easily installable from source code on non-Debian Linux distributions too, to install it on any non-debian Linux distrubution do:

cd /usr/local/src/ wget https://logstalgia.googlecode.com/files/logstalgia-1.0.5.tar.gz
 

–2014-07-18 13:53:23–  https://logstalgia.googlecode.com/files/logstalgia-1.0.3.tar.gz
Resolving logstalgia.googlecode.com… 74.125.206.82, 2a00:1450:400c:c04::52
Connecting to logstalgia.googlecode.com|74.125.206.82|:443… connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 200 OK
Length: 841822 (822K) [application/x-gzip]
Saving to: `logstalgia-1.0.3.tar.gz'

100%[=================================>] 841,822     1.25M/s   in 0.6s

2014-07-18 13:53:24 (1.25 MB/s) – `logstalgia-1.0.3.tar.gz' saved [841822/841822]

Untar the archive with:
 

tar -zxvf logstalgia-1.0.5.tar.gz

Compile and install it:

cd logstalgia
./configure
make
make install

 

How to use LogStalgia?

Syntax is pretty straight forward just pass the Nginx / Apache

Process Debian Linux Apache logs:

logstalgia /var/log/apache2/access.log


Process CentoS, Redhat etc. RPM based logs:

logstalgia /var/log/httpd/access.log
To process webserver log in real time with logstalgia:

tail -f /var/log/httpd/access_log | logstalgia -

To make logstalgia visualize log output you will need to have access to server physical console screen. As physical access is not possible on most dedicated servers – already colocated in some Datacenter. You can also use a local Linux PC / notebook installed with nostalgia to process webserver access logs remotely like so:

logstalgia-visualize-your-apache-nginx-lighttpd-logs-graphically-in-x-and-console-locally-and-remotely

ssh hipo@pc-freak.net tail -f /var/log/apache2/access.log | logstalgia --sync

Note! If you get an empty output from logstalgia, this is because of permission issues, in this example my user hipo is added in www-data Apache group – if you want to add your user to have access like me, issue on remote ssh server):
 

addgroup hipo www-data


Alterantively you can login with ssh with root, e.g. ssh root@pc-freak.net

If you're having a GNOME / KDE X environment on the Linux machine from which you're ssh-ing Logstalgia will visualize Webserver access.log requests inside a new X Window otherwise if you're on a Linux with just a console with no Xserver graphics it will visualize graphically web log statistics using console svgalib .

 

If you're planning to save output from nostalgia visualization screen for later use – lets say you have to present to your CEO statistics about all your servers  Webservers logs you can save nostalgia produced video in .ppm (netpbm) format.

Whether you have physical console access to the server:

logstalgia -1280x720 --output-ppm-stream output.ppm /var/log/httpd/access.log

Or if you just a have a PC with Linux and you want to save visualized content of access.log remotely:

ssh hipo@pc-freak.net tail -f /var/log/nginx/pc-freak-access.log | logstalgia -1280x720 --output-ppm-stream --sync output.ppm

 

ssh user@server1.cyberciti.biz tail -f /var/log/nginx/www.cyberciti.biz_access.log | logstalgia -1280x720 --output-ppm-stream --sync output.ppm

To make produced .ppm later usable you can use ffmpeg to convert to .mp4:

ffmpeg -y -r 60 -f image2pipe -vcodec ppm -i output.ppm -vcodec libx264 -preset ultrafast -pix_fmt yuv420p -crf 1 -threads 0 -bf 0 nginx.server.log.mp4

Then to play the videos use any video player, I usually use vlc and mplayer.

For complete info on Nostalgia – website access log visualizercheck home page on googlecode

If you're lazy to install Logstalgia, here is Youtube video made from its output:

Enjoy 🙂