Archive for the ‘Programming’ Category

How to Avoid the 7 Most Frequent Mistakes in Python Programming

Monday, September 9th, 2019

python-programming-language-logo

Python is very appealing for Rapid Application Development for many reasons, including high-level built in data structures, dynamic typing and binding, or to use as glue to connect different components. It’s simple and easy to learn but new Python developers can fall in the trap of missing certain subtleties.

Here are 7 common mistakes that are harder to catch but that even more experienced Python developers have fallen for.

 

1. The misuse of expressions as function argument defaults

Python allows developers to indicate optional function arguments by giving them default values. In most cases, this is a great feature of Python, but it can create some confusion when the default value is mutable. In fact, the common mistake is thinking that the optional argument is set to whatever default value you’ve set every time the function argument is presented without a value. It can seem a bit complicated, but the answer is that the default value for this function argument is only evaluated at the time you’ve defined the function, one time only.  

how-to-avoid-the-7-most-frequent-mistakes-in-python-programming-3

 

2. Incorrect use of class variables

Python handles class variables internally as dictionaries and they will follow the Method Resolution Order (MRO). If an attribute is not found in one class it will be looked up in base classes so references to one part of the code are actually references to another part, and that can be quite difficult to handle well in Python. For class attributes, I recommend reading up on this aspect of Python independently to be able to handle them.

how-to-avoid-the-7-most-frequent-mistakes-in-python-programming-2

 

3. Incorrect specifications of parameters for exception blocks

There is a common problem in Python when except statements are provided but they don’t take a list of the exceptions specified. The syntax except Exception is used to bind these exception blocks to optional parameters so that there can be further inspections. What happens, however, is that certain exceptions are then not being caught by the except statement, but the exception becomes bound to parameters. The way to get block exceptions in one except statement has to be done by specifying the first parameter as a tuple to contain all the exceptions that you want to catch.

how-to-avoid-the-7-most-frequent-mistakes-in-python-programming-1
 

4. Failure to understand the scope rules

The scope resolution on Python is built on the LEGB rule as it’s commonly known, which means Local, Enclosing, Global, Built-in. Although at first glance this seems simple, there are some subtleties about the way it actually works in Python, which creates a more complex Python problem. If you make an assignment to a variable in a scope, Python will assume that variable is local to the scope and will shadow a variable that’s similarly named in other scopes. This is a particular problem especially when using lists.

 

5. Modifying lists during iterations over it

 

When a developer deletes an item from a list or array while iterating, they stumble upon a well known Python problem that’s easy to fall into. To address this, Python has incorporated many programming paradigms which can really simplify and streamline code when they’re used properly. Simple code is less likely to fall into the trap of deleting a list item while iterating over it. You can also use list comprehensions to avoid this problem.

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6. Name clash with Python standard library

 

Python has so many library modules which is a bonus of the language, but the problem is that you can inadvertently have a name clash between your module and a module in the standard library. The problem here is that you can accidentally import another library which will import the wrong version. To avoid this, it’s important to be aware of the names in the standard library modules and stay away from using them.

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7. Problems with binding variables in closures


Python has a late binding behavior which looks up the values of variables in closure only when the inner function is called. To address this, you may have to take advantage of default arguments to create anonymous functions that will give you the desired behavior – it’s either elegant or a hack depending on how you look at it, but it’s important to know.

 

 

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Python is very powerful and flexible and it’s a great language for developers, but it’s important to be familiar with the nuances of it to optimize it and avoid these errors.

Ellie Coverdale, a technical writer at Essay roo and UK Writings, is involved in tech research and projects to find new advances and share her insights. She shares what she has learned with her readers on the Boom Essays blog.

How to build Linux logging bash shell script write_log, logging with Named Pipe buffer, Simple Linux common log files logging with logger command

Monday, August 26th, 2019

how-to-build-bash-script-for-logging-buffer-named-pipes-basic-common-files-logging-with-logger-command

Logging into file in GNU / Linux and FreeBSD is as simple as simply redirecting the output, e.g.:
 

echo "$(date) Whatever" >> /home/hipo/log/output_file_log.txt


or with pyping to tee command

 

echo "$(date) Service has Crashed" | tee -a /home/hipo/log/output_file_log.txt


But what if you need to create a full featured logging bash robust shell script function that will run as a daemon continusly as a background process and will output
all content from itself to an external log file?
In below article, I've given example logging script in bash, as well as small example on how a specially crafted Named Pipe buffer can be used that will later store to a file of choice.
Finally I found it interesting to mention few words about logger command which can be used to log anything to many of the common / general Linux log files stored under /var/log/ – i.e. /var/log/syslog /var/log/user /var/log/daemon /var/log/mail etc.
 

1. Bash script function for logging write_log();


Perhaps the simplest method is just to use a small function routine in your shell script like this:
 

write_log()
LOG_FILE='/root/log.txt';
{
  while read text
  do
      LOGTIME=`date "+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"`
      # If log file is not defined, just echo the output
      if [ “$LOG_FILE” == “” ]; then
    echo $LOGTIME": $text";
      else
        LOG=$LOG_FILE.`date +%Y%m%d`
    touch $LOG
        if [ ! -f $LOG ]; then echo "ERROR!! Cannot create log file $LOG. Exiting."; exit 1; fi
    echo $LOGTIME": $text" | tee -a $LOG;
      fi
  done
}

 

  •  Using the script from within itself or from external to write out to defined log file

 

echo "Skipping to next copy" | write_log

 

2. Use Unix named pipes to pass data – Small intro on what is Unix Named Pipe.


Named Pipe –  a named pipe (also known as a FIFO (First In First Out) for its behavior) is an extension to the traditional pipe concept on Unix and Unix-like systems, and is one of the methods of inter-process communication (IPC). The concept is also found in OS/2 and Microsoft Windows, although the semantics differ substantially. A traditional pipe is "unnamed" and lasts only as long as the process. A named pipe, however, can last as long as the system is up, beyond the life of the process. It can be deleted if no longer used.
Usually a named pipe appears as a file, and generally processes attach to it for IPC.

 

Once named pipes were shortly explained for those who hear it for a first time, its time to say named pipe in unix / linux is created with mkfifo command, syntax is straight foward:
 

mkfifo /tmp/name-of-named-pipe


Some older Linux-es with older bash and older bash shell scripts were using mknod.
So idea behind logging script is to use a simple named pipe read input and use date command to log the exact time the command was executed, here is the script.

 

#!/bin/bash
named_pipe='/tmp/output-named-pipe';
output_named_log='
/tmp/output-named-log.txt ';

if [ -p $named_pipe ]; then
rm -f $named_pipe
fi
mkfifo $named_pipe

while true; do
read LINE <$named_pipe
echo $(date): "$LINE" >>/tmp/output-named-log.txt
done


To write out any other script output and get logged now, any of your output with a nice current date command generated output write out any output content to the loggin buffer like so:

 

echo 'Using Named pipes is so cool' > /tmp/output-named-pipe
echo 'Disk is full on a trigger' > /tmp/output-named-pipe

  • Getting the output with the date timestamp

# cat /tmp/output-named-log.txt
Mon Aug 26 15:21:29 EEST 2019: Using Named pipes is so cool
Mon Aug 26 15:21:54 EEST 2019: Disk is full on a trigger


If you wonder why it is better to use Named pipes for logging, they perform better (are generally quicker) than Unix sockets.

 

3. Logging files to system log files with logger

 

If you need to do a one time quick way to log any message of your choice with a standard Logging timestamp, take a look at logger (a part of bsdutils Linux package), and is a command which is used to enter messages into the system log, to use it simply invoke it with a message and it will log your specified output by default to /var/log/syslog common logfile

 

root@linux:/root# logger 'Here we go, logging'
root@linux:/root # tail -n 3 /var/log/syslog
Aug 26 15:41:01 localhost CRON[24490]: (root) CMD (chown qscand:qscand -R /var/run/clamav/ 2>&1 >/dev/null)
Aug 26 15:42:01 localhost CRON[24547]: (root) CMD (chown qscand:qscand -R /var/run/clamav/ 2>&1 >/dev/null)
Aug 26 15:42:20 localhost hipo: Here we go, logging

 

If you have took some time to read any of the init.d scripts on Debian / Fedora / RHEL / CentOS Linux etc. you will notice the logger logging facility is heavily used.

With logger you can print out message with different priorities (e.g. if you want to write an error message to mail.* logs), you can do so with:
 

 logger -i -p mail.err "Output of mail processing script"


To log a normal non-error (priority message) with logger to /var/log/mail.log system log.

 

 logger -i -p mail.notice "Output of mail processing script"


A whole list of supported facility named priority valid levels by logger (as taken of its current Linux manual) are as so:

 

FACILITIES AND LEVELS
       Valid facility names are:

              auth
              authpriv   for security information of a sensitive nature
              cron
              daemon
              ftp
              kern       cannot be generated from userspace process, automatically converted to user
              lpr
              mail
              news
              syslog
              user
              uucp
              local0
                to
              local7
              security   deprecated synonym for auth

       Valid level names are:

              emerg
              alert
              crit
              err
              warning
              notice
              info
              debug
              panic     deprecated synonym for emerg
              error     deprecated synonym for err
              warn      deprecated synonym for warning

       For the priority order and intended purposes of these facilities and levels, see syslog(3).

 


If you just want to log to Linux main log file (be it /var/log/syslog or /var/log/messages), depending on the Linux distribution, just type', even without any shell quoting:

 

logger 'The reason to reboot the server Currently was a System security Update

 

So what others is logger useful for?

 In addition to being a good diagnostic tool, you can use logger to test if all basic system logs with its respective priorities work as expected, this is especially
useful as I've seen on a Cloud Holsted OpenXEN based servers as a SAP consultant, that sometimes logging to basic log files stops to log for months or even years due to
syslog and syslog-ng problems hungs by other thirt party scripts and programs.
To test test all basic logging and priority on system logs as expected use the following logger-test-all-basic-log-logging-facilities.sh shell script.

 

#!/bin/bash
for i in {auth,auth-priv,cron,daemon,kern, \
lpr,mail,mark,news,syslog,user,uucp,local0 \
,local1,local2,local3,local4,local5,local6,local7}

do        
# (this is all one line!)

 

for k in {debug,info,notice,warning,err,crit,alert,emerg}
do

logger -p $i.$k "Test daemon message, facility $i priority $k"

done

done

Note that on different Linux distribution verions, the facility and priority names might differ so, if you get

logger: unknown facility name: {auth,auth-priv,cron,daemon,kern,lpr,mail,mark,news, \
syslog,user,uucp,local0,local1,local2,local3,local4, \
local5,local6,local7}

check and set the proper naming as described in logger man page.

 

4. Using a file descriptor that will output to a pre-set log file


Another way is to add the following code to the beginning of the script

#!/bin/bash
exec 3>&1 4>&2
trap 'exec 2>&4 1>&3' 0 1 2 3
exec 1>log.out 2>&1
# Everything below will go to the file 'log.out':

The code Explaned

  •     Saves file descriptors so they can be restored to whatever they were before redirection or used themselves to output to whatever they were before the following redirect.
    trap 'exec 2>&4 1>&3' 0 1 2 3
  •     Restore file descriptors for particular signals. Not generally necessary since they should be restored when the sub-shell exits.

          exec 1>log.out 2>&1

  •     Redirect stdout to file log.out then redirect stderr to stdout. Note that the order is important when you want them going to the same file. stdout must be redirected before stderr is redirected to stdout.

From then on, to see output on the console (maybe), you can simply redirect to &3. For example
,

echo "$(date) : Do print whatever you want logging to &3 file handler" >&3


I've initially found out about this very nice bash code from serverfault.com's post how can I fully log all bash script actions (but unfortunately on latest Debian 10 Buster Linux  that is prebundled with bash shell 5.0.3(1)-release the code doesn't behave exactly, well but still on older bash versions it works fine.

Sum it up


To shortlysummarize there is plenty of ways to do logging from a shell script logger command but using a function or a named pipe is the most classic. Sometimes if a script is supposed to write user or other script output to a a common file such as syslog, logger command can be used as it is present across most modern Linux distros.
If you have a better ways, please drop a common and I'll add it to this article.

 

How to make for loop (cycles) in KSH useful for FreeBSD / UNIX system administrators

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

korn-shell-how-to-make-loops-easily-for-sys-admin-purposes

Sometimes we have to administrate this operating systems such as FreeBSD / AIX / HP UX or even Mac OS server where by default due to historical reasons or for security bash shell is not avialable. That's not a common scenario but it happens so if as sysadmin we need to create for loops on ksh it is useful to know how to do that, as for loop cycles are one of the most important command line tools the sysadmin swiss army knife kind of.

So how to create a for loop (cycle) in ksh (Korn Shell)?

The most basic example for a KSH loop shell is below:
 

#!/bin/ksh
for i in 1 2 3 4 5
do
  echo "Welcome $i times"
done

 


Add the content to any file lets say ksh_loop.ksh then make it executable as you do in bash shells

 

 

$ chmod +x ksh_loop.ksh
$ ksh ksh_loop.ksh

 


The overall syntax of the for loop ksh command is as follows:

 

 

for {Variable} in {lists}
do
    echo ${Variable}
done

 


Hence to list lets say 20 iterations in a loop in ksh you can use something like:
 

#!/bin/ksh
for i in {1..20}
do
  echo "Just a simple echo Command $i times";
# add whatever system commands you like here
done

 


Example for some useful example with KSH loop is to list a directory content so you can execute whatever command you need on each of the files or directories inside

 

#!/bin/ksh
for f in $(ls /tmp/*)
do
        print "Iterating whatever command you like on /tmp dir : $f"
done


Other useful for loop iteration would be to print a file content line by line just like it is done in bash shell, you can do that with a small loop like belows:

 

#!/bin/ksh
for iteration_variable in $(cat  file_with-your-loved-content-to-iterate.txt)
do
        print "Current iteration like is : $iteration_variable"
done

 

Command to get CPU server load in % percentage using bash and /proc/stat on Linux

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Command-to-get-CPU-server-load-in-percentage-using-bash-shell-script-and-linux-proc-stat

Getting load avarage is easy with uptime command, however since nowadays Linux servers are running on multiple CPU machines and Dual cores, returned load avarage shows only information concerning a single processor. Of course seeing overall CPU server load is possible with TOP / TLoad command  / HTOP and a bunch of other monitoring commands, but how you can get a CPU percentage server load using just  /proc/stat and bash scripting? Here is hwo:
 

:;sleep=1;CPU=(`cat /proc/stat | head -n 1`);PREV_TOTAL=0;for VALUE in "${CPU[@]}”; do let “PREV_TOTAL=$PREV_TOTAL+$VALUE”;done;PREV_IDLE=${CPU[4]};sleep $sleep; CPU=(`cat /proc/stat | head -n 1`);unset CPU[0];IDLE=${CPU[4]};TOTAL=0; for VALUE in “${CPU[@]}"; do let "TOTAL=$TOTAL+$VALUE"; done;echo $(echo "scale=2; ((($sleep*1000)*(($TOTAL-$PREV_TOTAL)-($IDLE-$PREV_IDLE))/($TOTAL-$PREV_TOTAL))/10)" | bc -l );

52.45

As you can see command output shows CPU is loaded on 52.45%, so this server will soon have to be replaced with better hardware, because it gets CPU loaded over 50%

It is useful to use above bash shell command one liner together with little for loop to refresh output every few seconds and see how the CPU is loaded in percentage over time.

 

for i in $(seq 0 10); do :;sleep=1;CPU=(`cat /proc/stat | head -n 1`);PREV_TOTAL=0;for VALUE in "${CPU[@]}”; do let “PREV_TOTAL=$PREV_TOTAL+$VALUE”;done;PREV_IDLE=${CPU[4]};sleep $sleep; CPU=(`cat /proc/stat | head -n 1`);unset CPU[0];IDLE=${CPU[4]};TOTAL=0; for VALUE in “${CPU[@]}"; do let "TOTAL=$TOTAL+$VALUE"; done;echo $(echo "scale=2; ((($sleep*1000)*(($TOTAL-$PREV_TOTAL)-($IDLE-$PREV_IDLE))/($TOTAL-$PREV_TOTAL))/10)" | bc -l ); done

47.50

13.86
27.36
82.67
77.18

To monitor "forever" output from all server processor overall load use:
 

while [ 1 ]; do :;sleep=1;CPU=(`cat /proc/stat | head -n 1`);PREV_TOTAL=0;for VALUE in “${CPU[@]}”; do let “PREV_TOTAL=$PREV_TOTAL+$VALUE”;done;PREV_IDLE=${CPU[4]};sleep $sleep; CPU=(`cat /proc/stat | head -n 1`);unset CPU[0];IDLE=${CPU[4]};TOTAL=0; for VALUE in “${CPU[@]}"; do let "TOTAL=$TOTAL+$VALUE"; done;echo $(echo "scale=2; ((($sleep*1000)*(($TOTAL-$PREV_TOTAL)-($IDLE-$PREV_IDLE))/($TOTAL-$PREV_TOTAL))/10)" | bc -l ); done

 

 

How to check Apache Webserver and MySQL server uptime – Check uptime of a running daemon with PS (process) command

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

check_Apache_Webserver_and_MySQL_server_uptime_-_Check-uptime-of-running-daemon-service-with-PS-process-command

Something very useful that most Apache LAMP (Linux Apache MySQL PHP) admins should know is how to check Apache Webserver uptime and MySQL server running (uptime).
Checking Apache / MySQL uptime is primary useful for scripting purposes – creating auto Apache / MySQL service restart scripts, or just as a quick console way to check what is the status and uptime of Webserver / SQL.

My experience as a sysadmin shows that lack of Periodic Apache and MySQL restart every week or every month often creates sys-admin a lot of a headaches cause (Apache / NGINX / SQL  server) starts eating too much memory or under some circumstances leads to service or system crashes. Periodic system main services restart is especially helpful in case if Website's backend programming code is writetn in a bad and buggy uneffient way by unprofessional (novice) programmers.
While I was still working as Senior SysAdmin in Design.BG, I've encountered many such Crappy Web applications developed by dozen of different programmers (because company's programmers changed too frequently and many of the hired Web Developers ,were still learning to program, I guess same is true also for other Start-UP Web / IT Company where crappy programming code is developed you will certainly need to keep an eye on Apache / MYSQL uptime.  If that's the case below 2 quick one liners with PS command will help you keep an eye on Apache / MYSQL uptime

 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"| grep apache2 | grep -v grep|grep root
root     apache2            02:30:05

Note that above example is Debian specific on RPM based distributions you will have to grep for httpd instead of apache2
 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"| grep http| grep -v grep|grep root

root     apache2            10:30:05

To check MySQL uptine:
 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"| grep mysqld
root     mysqld_safe        20:42:53
mysql    mysqld             20:42:53


Though example is for mysql and Apache you can easily use ps cmd in same way to check any other Linux service uptime such as Java / Qmail / PostgreSQL / Postfix etc.
 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"|grep qmail
qmails   qmail-send      19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        19-01:10:48
root     qmail-lspawn    19-01:10:48
qmailr   qmail-rspawn    19-01:10:48
qmailq   qmail-clean     19-01:10:48
qmails   qmail-todo      19-01:10:48
qmailq   qmail-clean     19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        40-18:02:53

 

 ps -eo "%U %c %t"|grep -i nginx|grep -v root|uniq
nobody   nginx           55-01:22:44

 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"|grep -i java|grep -v root |uniq
hipo   java            27-22:02:07

 

How to SSH client Login to server with password provided from command line as a script argument – Running same commands to many Linux servers

Friday, March 6th, 2015

ssh-how-to-login-with-password-provided-from-command-line-use-sshpass-to-run-same-command-to-forest-of-linux-servers

Usually admins like me who casuanlly need to administer "forests" (thousands of identicallyconfigured services Linux servers) are generating and using RSA / DSA key authentication for passwordless login, however this is not always possible as some client environments does prohibit the use of RSA / DSA non-pass authentication, thus in such environments to make routine server basic package rpm / deb upgrades or do other maintanance patching its necessery to use normal ssh user / pass login but as ssh client doesn't allow password to be provided from prompt for security reasons and therefore using some custom bash loop to issue single command to many servers (such as explained in my previous article) requires you to copy / paste password on password prompt multiple times. This works its pretty annoying so if you want to run single command on all your 500 servers with specifying the password from password prompt use sshpass tool (for non-interactive ssh password auth).

SSHPASS official site description:
 

sshpass is a utility designed for running ssh using the mode referred to as "keyboard-interactive" password authentication, but in non-interactive mode.

 

Install sshpass on Debian / Ubuntu (deb based) Linux

sshpass is installable right out of regular repositories so to install run:
 

apt-get install —yes sshpass


Install sshpass on CentOS / Fedora (RPM based) Linux


sshpass is available also across most RPM based distros too so just use yum package manager

 

yum -y install sshpass


If its not available across standard RPM distro provided repositories, there should be RPM on the net for distro just download latest one and use wget and rpm to install:

 wget -q http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/sshpass-1.05-1.el6.x86_64.rpm

 rpm -ivh sshpass-1.05-1.el6.x86_64.rpm

 

How Does SshPass Works?

 

Normally openssh (ssh) client binary uses direct TTY (/dev/tty)= an abbreviation for PhyTeleTYpewriter or (the admin jargon call Physical Console access)  instead of standard remotely defined /dev/ptsVirtual PTY.
To get around this Sshpass runs ssh in a dedicated TTY to emulate the password is indeed issues by interactive keyboard user thus  fooling remote sshd server to thinking password
is provided by interactive user.


SSHPass use

Very basic standard use which allows you to pass the password from command line is like this:
 

sshpass -p 'Your_Password_Goes_here123' ssh username@server.your-server.com


Note that the server you're working is shared with other developers they might be able to steal your username / password by using a simple process list command such as:
 

 ps auxwwef


In my case security is not a hot issue, as I'm the only user on the server (and only concern might be if someone hacks into the server 🙂 

 

Then assuming that you have a plain text file with all your administered servers, you can easily use sshpass in a Bash Script loop in order to run, lets say a package upgrade across all identical Linux version machines:
 

while read line; do
sshpass -p 'Your_Password_Goes_here123' ssh username@$line "apt-get update && apt-get upgrade && apt-get dist-upgrade" < /dev/null;
done < all_servers_list.txt

Change the command you like to issue across all machines with the string "apt-get …"
Above command can be used to keep up2date all Debian stable server packages. What you will do on servers is up to your imaginations, very common use of above line would be if you want to see uptime /netstat command output across all your network servers.

 

while read line; do
sshpass -p 'Your_Password_Goes_here123' ssh username@$line "uptime; who; netstat -tunlp; " < /dev/null;
done < all_servers_list.txt

 


As you can guess SshPass is swiss army knife tool for admins whoneed to automate things with scripts simultaneously across number of servers.
 

Happy SSH-ing 🙂

 

 

 

Remove \r (Carriage Return) from string with standard bash shell / sed / tr / vim or awk – Replace \r hidden messy characters from files

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

remove_r_carriage_return_from_string_with-standard-bash_shell_sed_tr_or_awk_replace_annoying_hidden_messy_characters_from_files

I've been recently writting this Apache webserver / Tomcat / JBoss / Java decomissioning bash script. Part of the script includes extraction from httpd.conf of DocumentRoot variable configured for Apache host.
I was using following one liner to grep and store DocumentRoot set directory into new variable:

documentroot=$(grep -i documentroot /usr/local/apache/conf/httpd.conf | awk '{ print $2 }' |sed -e 's#"##g');

Above line greps for documentroot prints 2nd column of the matchi (which is the Apache server set docroot and then removes any " chars).

However I faced the issue that parsed string contained in $documentroot variable there was mysteriously containing r – return carriage – this is usually Carriage Return (CR) sent by Mac OS and Apple computers. For those who don't know the End of Line of files in UNIX / Linux OS-es is LF – often abreviated as n – often translated as return new line), while Windows PCs use for EOF CR + LF – known as the infamous  rn. I was running the script from the server which is running SuSE SLES 11 Linux, meaning the CR + LF end of file is standardly used, however it seem someone has editted the httpd.conf earlier with a text editor from Mac OS X (Terminal). Thus I needed a way to remove the r from CR character out of the variable, because otherwise I couldn't use it to properly exec tar to archive the documentroot set directory, cause the documentroot directory was showing unexistent.

Opening the httpd.conf in standard editor didn't show the r at the end of
"directory", e.g. I could see in the file when opened with vim

DocumentRoot "/usr/local/apache/htdocs/site/www"

However obviously the r character was there to visualize it I had to use cat command -v option (–show-nonprinting):

cat -v /usr/local/apache/conf/httpd.conf

DocumentRoot "/usr/local/apache/htdocs/site/wwwr"


1. Remove the r CR with bash

To solve that with bash, I had to use another quick bash parsing that scans through $directory and removes r, here is how:

documentroot=${documentroot%$'r'}

It is also possible to use same example to remove "broken" Windows rn Carriage Returns after file is migrated from Windows to Liunx /  FreeBSD host:

documentroot=${documentroot%$'rn'}

 

2. Remove r Carriage Return character with sed

Other way to do remove (del) Windows / Mac OS Carriage Returns in case if Migrating to UNIX is with sed (stream editor).

sed -i s/r// filename >> filename_out.txt


3. Remove r CR character with tr

There is a third way also to do it with (tr) – translate or delete characters old shool *nix command:

tr -d 'r' < file_with_carriagereturns > file_without_carriage_returns

 

4. Remove r CRs with awk (pattern scanning and processing language)

 awk 'sub("$", "r")' inputf_with_crs.txt > outputf_without_crs.txt


5. Delete r CR with VIM editor

:%s/r//g


6. Converting  file DOS / UNIX OSes with dos2unix and unix2dos command line tools

For sysadmins who don't want to bother with writting code to convert CR when moving files between Windows and UNIX hosts there are dos2unix and unix2dos installable commands.

All done Cheers ! 🙂