Posts Tagged ‘Anyways’

How to update macos from terminal / Check and update remotely Mac OS X software from console

Friday, October 23rd, 2015

../files/how-to-update-mac-osx-notebook-from-terminalsoftware-update-command-line-mac-screnshot-1

If you happen to have to deal with Mac OS X (Apple) notebook or Desktop PC (Hackintosh) etc. and you’re sysadmin or console freak being pissed off Mac’s GUI App Store update interface and you want to “keep it simple stupid” (KISS) in an Debian Linux like apt-get manner then you can also use Mac’s console application (cli) terminal to do the updates manually from command line with:

softwareupdate

command.

how-to-update-mac-osx-notebook-from-terminalsoftware-update-command-line-mac-screnshot

To get help about softwareupdate pass it on the -h flag:

softwareupdate -h

1. Get a list of available Mac OS updates

Though not a very likely scenario of course before installing it is always a wise thing to see what is being updated to make sure you will not upgrade something that you don’t want to.
This is done with:

softwareupdate -l

However in most cases you can simply skip this step as updating directly every package installed on the Mac with a new version from Apple will not affect your PC.
Anyways it is always a good idea to keep a backup image of your OS before proceeding with updates with let’s say Time Machine Mac OS backup app.

2. Install only recommended Updates from Apple store

softwareupdate -irv


Above will download all updates that are critical and thus a must to have in order to keep Mac OS security adequate.
Translated into Debian / Ubuntu Linux language, the command does pretty much the same as Linux’s:

apt-get –yes update

3. Install All Updates available from AppleStore

To install absolutely all updates provided by Apple’s package repositories run:

softwareupdate -iva

One note to make here is that always when you keep updating make sure your notebook is switched on to electricity grid otherwise if due to battery discharge it shutoffs during update your Mac will crash in a very crappy hard to recover state that might even cost you a complete re-install or a need to bring a PC to a Mac Store technical support guy so beware, you’re warned!

4. Installing all updates except Specific Softwares from Terminal

Often if you have a cracked software or a software whose GUI interface changed too much and you don’t want to upgrade it but an update is offered by Apple repos you can add the -i ingnore option:

softwareupdate -i [update_name(s)]

For example:

softwareupdate -i Safari-version-XXXX

5. View Mac OS Software Update History

The quickest way to see the update history is with System Information app, e.g.:

/Applications/Utilities/System Information.app

Fix audioCD play problems with VLC on GNU Linux

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

I've not played audio CD for ages. Anyways I had to set up one computer with Linux just recently and one of the requirements was to be able to play audiocds.
I was surprised that actually a was having issue with such as simple tasks.
Here is how i come with this article.

If you encounter errors playing Audio CDs on any Linux distro in VLC or other players, you might need to apply the following fix.

root@xubuntu-desktop:~# apt-get install xubuntu-restricted-extras
...
root@xubuntu-desktop:~# apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras
...

I'm not sure if this packages are required, anyways having them installed is a good idea especially on computers which will have to support as much multimedia as possible.

Trying to play a CD with VLC the result was not nice, you see in the picture above the error that poped up while trying it with VLC:

Due to wrong configuration of the play device VLC will be looking to read the audio cd from.

To succesfully play the audiocd invoke VLC command with a cdda///dev/sr0 argument like so:

hipo@xubuntu-desktop:~$ vlc cdda:///dev/sr0
...

To permanently fix the error you will have to edit ~/.config/vlc/vlcrc :

Inside ~/.config/vlc/vlcrc find the lines:

dvd=/dev/cdrom

Substitute the above line with:

dvd=/dev/sr0

Next find the line:

vcd=/dev/cdrom

Change the above line with:

vcd=/dev/sr0
Due to a bug in generating vlcrc , the dvd= might be set also to other messy unreadable characters (different from /dev/cdrom). This can also be the reason why it fails to properly read the disc.

If dvd= and vcd is set to a different unreadable characters delete them and substitute with /dev/sr0 .I've experienced this on Xubuntu Linux with a Bulgarian localization (probably the bug can be seen in other Linuxes when GNOME is installed in Russian, Chineese and other UTF-8 languages.

The strange error can be observed also in other players when the localization is set to someone's native language …
Alternative solution is to install and use rhythmbox instead of VLC.
Other program to play audio CDs called workman , you will have to get used to the interface which uses gtk1 and therefore obsolete. Putting aside the ugly interface it works 😉

Malwarebytes a good Anti-Spyware anti-malware Windows program

Saturday, December 11th, 2010

malwarebytes_a_good_Anti-Spyware-anti-malware-windows-program-clean-your-pc-from-malwares-and-viruses
Dave just recommended me a nice software which is able to easily extinguish most of the nowdaysterrible spyware soft.
I had previously installed a cracked version of Spyware Doctor on this Windows machine and it was interesting that even though it’s so seriously praised the Spyware Doctor wasn’t able to find a bunch of stupid spyware.
Talking about Spyware what is a Spyware? Why is not a spyware a virus?

Anyways, I guess they just came up with a hype word to just market some more software as an anti-spyware soft.

To clean up your windows pc with go straigh to Malwarebytes download it and install it.
The full version of malwarebytes is paid but the good news is that the free version available for download lacks only the service of an integrated windows agent to constantly track your pc if a spyware is trying to enter from a website.

Just until recently I used to use the good old Spybot but this program is not anymore finding most of the malicious stuff, so I guess this malwarebytes is something I should install more often on Windows pcs I had to fix up.

safemode_with_networking_windows-PC-boot-option-screen-screenshot

If running Spyware Bytes, doesn’t succeed in cleaining the PC (and just if you want to have better guarantee that Malware will not auto-load on the PC again), run the PC in Safe Mode With Networking or just Safe Mode (keep pressing F8) before Windows boots and then run Malware Bytes again.

Auto insert password for a Trusted SSL Certificate / Automatically enter password for an SSL Certificate during Apache startup on Debian Lenny

Friday, March 26th, 2010

Protect-Your-Private-SSL_keys-Apache-howto
I've recently installed a Trusted certificate that I've previously protected with a pass-phrase to an Apache server running on top of Debian in order to have a better security.
Now everytime I restart Apache it's pretty annyoing and non-practical at the same time, to enter the Passphrase assigned to the SSL certificate.
It's also dangerous because if Apache crashes and tries to resurrect itself restartig it might not start-up again.
Another unpleasant possible scenario is if for example some of the php code developers tries to change something minor in some Virtualhost and afterwards restarts Apache for the new configurations to take place, again Apache won't bring up and a chaos would emerge.
So I decided to configurate my Apache that it auto fills in the passphrase each time it's being started or restarted.To do that I consulted some online resources and I end up redirected by a blog post to the mod_ssl ssl_reference web page

There is plenty of stuff on that document however in my case all I needed was one directive in /etc/apache2/mods-avalable/mods-available/ssl.conf :

SSLPassPhraseDialog exec:/etc/apache2/mods-available/passphrase

The above code must replace:

SSLPassPhraseDialog builtin

Now last step is to prepare the /etc/apache2/mods-available/passphrase .
Make sure the file has the following content:

#!/bin/sh
echo "yoursecretpassword"

Change above yoursecretpassword with your configured passphrase.
Also please make sure /etc/apache2/mods-availabe/passphrase has proper set permissions. In my case I've set the following permissions for the file:

debian:~# chown www-data:www-data /etc/apache2/mods-available/passphrase
debian:~# chmod 700 /etc/apache2/mods-available/passphrase

That should be it, Restart Apache and make sure Apache is properly loaded without anySSL passphrase prompts.
However you should have in mind that auto enabling passphrase loading on starting in Apache is much more insecure than typing in the password every time you restart Apache. Storing the passphrase in a file is quite insecure compared to if you type it every time Apache starts.
For instance if a hacker breaks into your server he might be able to steal your SSL certificate as well as the passphrase file.
And surely this is something you don't want. Anyways flexibility has a price and if you decide to go the way described, please note the risk first.

 

   

If you haven't already added a password to your private key during certficate generation time,

Of course you can add/remove a passphrase at a later time.

    add one (assuming it was an rsa key, else use dsa)

    openssl rsa -des3 -in your.key -out your.encrypted.key
    mv your.encrypted.key your.key

    the -des3 tells openssl to encrypt the key with DES3.

    remove it

    openssl rsa -in your.key -out your.open.key

    you will be asked for your passphrase one last time
    by omitting the -des3 you tell openssl to not encrypt the output.

    mv your.open.key your.key