Posts Tagged ‘crashes’

How to check Apache Webserver and MySQL server uptime – Check uptime of a running daemon with PS (process) command

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

check_Apache_Webserver_and_MySQL_server_uptime_-_Check-uptime-of-running-daemon-service-with-PS-process-command

Something very useful that most Apache LAMP (Linux Apache MySQL PHP) admins should know is how to check Apache Webserver uptime and MySQL server running (uptime).
Checking Apache / MySQL uptime is primary useful for scripting purposes – creating auto Apache / MySQL service restart scripts, or just as a quick console way to check what is the status and uptime of Webserver / SQL.

My experience as a sysadmin shows that lack of Periodic Apache and MySQL restart every week or every month often creates sys-admin a lot of a headaches cause (Apache / NGINX / SQL  server) starts eating too much memory or under some circumstances leads to service or system crashes. Periodic system main services restart is especially helpful in case if Website's backend programming code is writetn in a bad and buggy uneffient way by unprofessional (novice) programmers.
While I was still working as Senior SysAdmin in Design.BG, I've encountered many such Crappy Web applications developed by dozen of different programmers (because company's programmers changed too frequently and many of the hired Web Developers ,were still learning to program, I guess same is true also for other Start-UP Web / IT Company where crappy programming code is developed you will certainly need to keep an eye on Apache / MYSQL uptime.  If that's the case below 2 quick one liners with PS command will help you keep an eye on Apache / MYSQL uptime

 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"| grep apache2 | grep -v grep|grep root
root     apache2            02:30:05

Note that above example is Debian specific on RPM based distributions you will have to grep for httpd instead of apache2
 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"| grep http| grep -v grep|grep root

root     apache2            10:30:05

To check MySQL uptine:
 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"| grep mysqld
root     mysqld_safe        20:42:53
mysql    mysqld             20:42:53


Though example is for mysql and Apache you can easily use ps cmd in same way to check any other Linux service uptime such as Java / Qmail / PostgreSQL / Postfix etc.
 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"|grep qmail
qmails   qmail-send      19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        19-01:10:48
root     qmail-lspawn    19-01:10:48
qmailr   qmail-rspawn    19-01:10:48
qmailq   qmail-clean     19-01:10:48
qmails   qmail-todo      19-01:10:48
qmailq   qmail-clean     19-01:10:48
qmaill   multilog        40-18:02:53

 

 ps -eo "%U %c %t"|grep -i nginx|grep -v root|uniq
nobody   nginx           55-01:22:44

 

ps -eo "%U %c %t"|grep -i java|grep -v root |uniq
hipo   java            27-22:02:07

 

PHP: Better Webhosting Security – Disable exec(), exec_shell(), system(), popen(), eval() … shell fork functions

Sunday, June 23rd, 2013

increase php security better php security by disabling fork shell system and eval functions

If you work as System Administrator of WebHosting company, you definitely know how often it is that some automated cracker scripts (working as worms) intrude through buggy old crappy custom coded sites or unupdated obsolete Joomla / WordPress etc. installs. and run themselves trying to harvest for other vulnerable hosts. By default PHP enables running commands via shell with PHP functions like exec();, shell_exec(); , system();. and those script kiddie scripts use mainly this functions to spawn shell via vulnerable PHP app. Then scripts use whether php curl support is installed (i.e. php5-curl) to download and replicate itself to next vulnerable hop.

With that said it is a must after installing new Linux based server for hosting to disable this functions, to save yourself from future hassles …
Earlier, I blogged how to disable PHP system system(); and exec(); functions to raise Apache security using suhosin however this method requires php suhosin being used.

Yesterday, I had to configure new web hosting server with Debian 7, so I tried installing suhosin to use it to protect PHP from having enabled dangerous system();, eval(); exec(); .
I remember disabling system(); using suhosin php extension was working fine on older Debian releases, however in Debian 6.0, php5-suhosin package was causing severe Apache crashes and probably that's why in latest Debian Wheezy 7.0, php suhosin extension is no longer available. Therefore using suhosin method to disable system();, exec(); and other fork functions is no longer possible in Debian.

Since, suhosin is no longer there, I decided to use conventional PHP method via php.ini.

Here is how to do it

Edit:

/etc/php5/apache2/php.ini

debian:~# vim /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini
And near end of file placed:

disable_functions =exec,passthru,shell_exec,system,proc_open,
popen,curl_exec, curl_multi_exec,parse_ini_file,show_source

allow_url_fopen Off
allow_url_include Off

It is good to explain few of above functions – shell_exec, proc_open, popen, allow_url_fopen,show_source  and allow_url_include.

Disabling shell_exec – disables from PHP scripts executing commands with bash slash ` `, i.e. `ls`. proc_open and popen allows reading files from file system.

show_source – makes possible also reading other PHP source files or can be used to display content of other files from fs.

To read newly placed config vars in php.ini usual apache restart is necessary:

debian:~# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
[….] Restarting web server: apache2
. ok

Further on tо test whether system();, exec();, passthru(); … etc. are disabled. Make new PHP file with content:

<?php
error_reporting(E_ALL);
$disabled_functions = ini_get('disable_functions');
if ($disabled_functions!='')
{
    $arr = explode(',', $disabled_functions);
    sort($arr);
    echo 'Disabled Functions:
        ';
    for ($i=0; $i<count($arr); $i++)
    {
        echo $i.' - '.$arr[$i].'<br />';
    }
}
else
{
    echo 'No functions disabled';
}
?>

php show disabled functions screenshot improve php security by disabling shell spawn functions

Copy of above source code show_disabled_php_functions.php is here for download
. To test your Apache PHP configuration disabled functions download it with wget or curl and rename it to .php:

# cd /var/www # wget -q http://www.pc-freak.net/files/show_disabled_php_functions.php.txt
mv show_disabled_php_functions.php.txt show_disabled_php_functions.php

After disabling functions on those newly setup Debian hosting Apache webserver, I remembered, same functions were still active on another CentOS Linux server.

To disable it there as well, had to edit:

/etc/php.ini

[root@centos:~]# vim /etc/php.ini

And again place after last file line;

disable_functions =exec,passthru,shell_exec,system,proc_open,popen,
curl_exec, curl_multi_exec,parse_ini_file,show_source

allow_url_fopen Off
allow_url_include Off

Finally on CentOS host, had to restart Apache:

[root@centos:~]# /etc/init.d/httpd restart

For Security paranoids, there are plenty of other PHP functions to disable including, basic functions like ln, mv, mkdir, cp, cat etc.

Below is list of all functions to disable – only disable this whether you you're a PHP security freak and you're 100% some server hosted website will not use it:

disable_functions = "ln, cat, popen, pclose, posix_getpwuid, posix_getgrgid, posix_kill, parse_perms, system, dl, passthru, exec, shell_exec, popen, proc_close, proc_get_status, proc_nice, proc_open, escapeshellcmd, escapeshellarg, show_source, posix_mkfifo, mysql_list_dbs, get_current_user, getmyuid, pconnect, link, symlink, pcntl_exec, ini_alter, pfsockopen, leak, apache_child_terminate, posix_kill, posix_setpgid, posix_setsid, posix_setuid, proc_terminate, syslog, fpassthru, stream_select, socket_select, socket_create, socket_create_listen, socket_create_pair, socket_listen, socket_accept, socket_bind, socket_strerror, pcntl_fork, pcntl_signal, pcntl_waitpid, pcntl_wexitstatus, pcntl_wifexited, pcntl_wifsignaled, pcntl_wifstopped, pcntl_wstopsig, pcntl_wtermsig, openlog, apache_get_modules, apache_get_version, apache_getenv, apache_note, apache_setenv, virtual, chmod, file_upload, delete, deleted, edit, fwrite, cmd, rename, unlink, mkdir, mv, touch, cp, cd, pico"

Optimize, check and repair tables in MySQL, howto improve work with tables in MySQL

Monday, April 12th, 2010

There are few quick tips that helps if some unexpected downtime of your SQL server occurs. Even though nowdays this won’t happen too often with servers running with a good ups, sometimes even administrator errors can cause problems with your mysql tables. If your MySQL server refuses to start, it’s quite probable that you’re experiencing a problem with a broken table or tables in MySQL. Therefore you need to go through all your mysql databases and check the consistency of your MyISAM or Innodb tables, ofcourse accordingly to your MySQL database types. To check a certain table for consistency with MySQL after you select the database, you have to execute: mysql$ CHECK TABLE your_table_name; If the above command after presumably executed with all your databases and there consequent tables reports, everytime OK then your MySQL crashes are not caused by table incosistencies. However if instead of OK the CHECK TABLE reports Corruptthen you have a broken table and you have to fix it as soon as possible, in order to be able to bring up to life the MySQL server once again. Here is an example of a broken table after a CHECK REPAIR searchindex; : +------------------+-------+----------+------------------------------------+ | Table | Op | Msg_type | Msg_text | +------------------+-------+----------+------------------------------------+ | test.searchindex | check | error | Key in wrong position at page 4096 | | test.searchindex | check | error | Corrupt | +------------------+-------+----------+------------------------------------+ To fix the CORRUPTED or BROKEN table as also known you have to issue the command: mysql$ REPAIR TABLE yourtable_name; Depending on your table size after a while, if everything is going fine you should see something like: +------------------+--------+----------+----------+ | Table | Op | Msg_type | Msg_text | +------------------+--------+----------+----------+ | test.searchindex | repair | status | OK | +------------------+--------+----------+----------+ 1 row in set (0.08 sec) Be aware that sometimes in order to fix a broken table you have to use the MySQL repair extended function. Expect The EXTENDED REPAIR function option to take a much more time, even sometimes with large databases with million of records it could take hours, especially if the MySQL server is serving other client requests as well. This terrible siutation sometimes occurs because of mysql locks, though I believe locks are probably a topic of another post. Hopefully after issuing that the table in MySQL would properly repair and your MySQL will begin starting up with the rc script once again. Apart from crashes and table repairs there are few nice things concerning MySQL that are doing me good every now and then. I’m talking about the MySQL functions: ANALYZE TABLE and OPTIMIZE TABLE ANALYZE TABLE does synchronization of the information concerning the variables within tables that has a INDEX key settled according to the database to which they belong. In other simply words, executing ANALYZE TABLE to your database tables every now and then and that would probably help in speeding up the code executed in the SQL that has JOINS involved. The second one OPTIMIZE TABLE is natively supported with MyISAM SQL database types, and secondary supported with Innodb, where the Optimize with Innodb is done in a non-traditional way. When invoked to process an Innodb table OPTIMIZE TABLE does use ALTER TABLE to achieve an Innodb table optimization. In practice what the optimize table does is defragmentation of the table unto which it’s executed. A quick example of the optimize table is for instance: OPTIMIZE TABLE your_table_name; In order to find out which tables need to be defragmented or in other words needs optimize table you have to issue the cmd: show table status where Data_free!=0; Note that you have to issue this command on each of your databases; Just because this is so boring you can of course use my script check_optimize_sql.sh which will quickly loop through all the databases and show you which tables need to be optimized. I’ve written also a second shell script that loops through all MySQL databases and lists all databases and sub tables that requires optimize and further on proceeds optimizing to download the script check_and_optimize_sql_tables.sh click here Happy optimizing 🙂