Posts Tagged ‘Creating’

Creating multi-part zip archives in Linux with 7zip command to transfer large zip files data in parts

Monday, December 1st, 2014

creating-multi-part-zip-archives-in-Linux-debian-ubuntu-fedora-centos-rhel-with-7z-command-to-transfer-large-files-data-in-parts
Recently, I've blogged on how to move large files from source to destination server in parts on a slow / restricted networks or whenever the media is limtied in size. This is not a common scenario but it happens so if you're admin sooner or later you will need that. I give example with UNIX's split and unrar. However strip's file naming can get you insane (in case if you don't want to use cstrip command – split a file into sections determined by context lines instead) plus normal split Linux / *nix command doesn't support compression and encryption. On the other side on many Company internal Networks with Windows server hosts running – Winblows (2003, 2008, 1012) for security purposes it might be that WinRar is not installed, thus you might need to transfer the file parted between the GNU / Linux server and Windows server in standard OS supported by Windows ZIP format. Assuming that you have root (admin) access to the Linux host you can then archive your file in parts using ZIP encryption algorithm with 7zip.

1. Installing 7zip on CentOS / Fedora / RHEL and other Redhat based Linuces

If the Linux server is running:
Fedora / CentOS  / RHEL and you don't have 7zip installed yet install it with:

yum -y install p7zip

According to distros version  it might be the name could be a bit different if p7zip is different to find the one you need search with:

yum search p7zip

and install whatever you need
 

2. Installing 7zip on Debian / Ubuntu and other Debian based servers

apt-get install –yes p7zip-full

Depending on Deb based distro just like with fedora if p7zip-full pack is not installable, check 7zip's package distro version:

apt-cache search p7zip

 

3. Archiving ZIP file in multiple (sized) parts on GNU / Linux

7z a -v512m Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.zip Large-Many-Gigabytes-File.SQL

This would output multiple files:

Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.zip.001, Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.zip.002, Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.zip.003, Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.004 etc.

If you want to add security to the transferred file to protect newly created ZIP archive with password use following command:

7z a -v512m Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.zip Large-Many-Gigabytes-File.SQL

 

7-Zip [64] 9.20  Copyright (c) 1999-2010 Igor Pavlov  2010-11-18
p7zip Version 9.20 (locale=bg_BG.UTF-8,Utf16=on,HugeFiles=on,2 CPUs)
Scanning

Creating archive Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.zip


Enter password (will not be echoed) :

Once you have transferred all the many parts via (SSH/ FTPS or not preferrably HTTP / HTTPS / FTP) place them in the same folder and use Windows standard ZIP to unarchive.

If the archived 7zip files are to be unarchived on another Linux host (in case if multi part zip transfer is between Linux -> Linux hosts) to unarchive, parted files:

7z x Large-file-separated-in-multi-parts.zip.*

Create video from linux console / terminal – Record ssh terminal session as video with asciinema, showterm, termrecord

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

/var/www/images/asciinema-create-and-upload-ascii-terminal-console-videos-debian-gnu-linux-screenshot
You probably already know of existence of two Linux commands available by default across all Linux distributions scriptwhich makes a text based save of all commands executed on console and scriptreplay – which playbacks saved script command typescripts. Using this two you can save terminal sessions without problem, but in order to play them you need to have a Linux / UNIX computer at hand.
However If you want to make a short video record displaying what you have done on Linux console / terminal, you have few other options with which you can share your Linux terminal sessions on the web. In this short article I will go through 3 popular tools to do that – asciinema, showterm and termrecord.

1. Asciinema Current most popular tool to create video from Linux terminal

Here is how ASCIINEMA's website describes it:

"Asciinema is a free and open source solution for recording the terminal sessions and sharing them on the web."

apt-get –yes install python-pip

To install it with pip python package installer

pip install asciinema

Or if the machine is in DMZ secured zone and have access to the internet over a Proxy:

pip install –proxy=http://internet-proxy-host.com:8080 asciinema

It will get installed in /usr/local/bin/asciinema to make a terminal screen video capture just launch it (nomatter if it is privileged or non-privileged user):

asciinema

To finalize and upload the recorded terminal session, just type exit (to exit the shell), hopefully it will get you an upload link.

exit

You can claim authorship on video you issue:

asciinema auth

Use can then embed the new Linux terminal session video to your website.
 

2. ShowTerm – "It's showtime in a terminal near you!"

ShowTerm have same features as AsciiNema. Just like AsciiNema, what it does is it creates a record of your terminal session and then uploads it to showterm.io website, providing you a link over which you can share your terminal lesson / ascii art video / whatever with your friends. ShowTerm is written in, the world famous Ruby on Railsruby web development framework, so you will need to have ruby programming language installed before use. As showterm uses the Internet to upload video, so it is not really an option to create videos from remote terminal session on servers which are in DMZ with no access to the internet, I will explain in a little while how to create video of your terminal / console for private purpose on local server and then share it online on your own site.

a) To install ShowTerm:

– First be sure to have ruby installed:

On Debian / Ubuntu and derives deb Linux, as supersuser:

apt-get install –yes ruby curl

On CentOS / RHEL / Fedora Linux

yum -y install ruby curl

NB! curl is real requirement but as showterm.io website recommends downloading the script with it and later same curl tool is used to upload the created showterm file to http://showterm.io .

– Then to finalize install, download showterm script and make it executable

curl showterm.io/showterm > ~/bin/showterm

% Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                       Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
100  2007  100  2007    0     0   2908      0 –:–:– –:–:– –:–:–  8468

mkdir ~/bin
chmod +x ~/bin/showterm

This will save the script into your home folder ~/bin/showterm

b) Using showterm

To run it to create video from your terminal simply start it and do whatver you will in terminal.

~/bin/showterm

After you're done with the video you like type exit

exit

create-video-from-your-linux-console-terminal-with-showterm-screenshot

Note that if your server is behind a proxy curl will not understand proxy set inside Linux shell variable with http_proxy var, to upload the file if you're behind a proxy you will have to pass to curl –proxy setting, once you get the curl line invoked after failure to upload use something like:

curl –proxy $(echo $http_proxy)  https://showterm.herokuapp.com/scripts –data-urlencode cols=80 –data-urlencode lines=24 –data-urlencode scriptfile@/tmp/yCudk.script –data-urlencode timingfile@/tmp/lkiXP.timing

Where assuming proxy is defined already inside http_proxy shell variable.

 

3. Creating video from your terminal / console on Linux for local (private) use with TermRecord

In my humble view TermRecord is the most awesome of all the 3, as it allows you to make records with an own generated Javascript based video player and allows you to keep the videos on your own side, guaranteeing you independence of external services. Its
 

pip install TermRecord

TermRecord -o /tmp/session.html

 

You can further access the video in a local browser in Firefox / Chrome / Epiphany type in URL address bar:

/tmp/session.html to play the video

create-video-from-terminal-console-on-gnu-linux-howto-screenshot-with-termrecord

TermRecord uses term.js javascript to create the video web player and play the video which is directly encoded inside session.html.
If you want to share the video online, place it on your webserver and you're done 🙂
Check out my TermRecord generated video terminal sample session here.
 

Quick way to access remotely your GNU / Linux Desktop – Access Linux Desktop from Mac and Windows 7

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

how-to-access-linux-host-from-microsoft-windows-or-mac-client-xrdp-tightvnc-native-way-logo
For M$ Windows users its always handy to have remote access to your home PC or notebook via Remote Desktop (RDP) protocol.

However in GNU / Linux, there is no native implementation of RDP protocol. So if you're using Linux as your Desktop like me you will probably want to be able to access the Linux system remotely not only via terminal with SSH using (Putty) or MobaXTerm all in one tabbed Windows terminal program but also be able to use your Linux GNOME / KDE Graphical environment from anywhere on the Internet.

This will make you ponder – Is it possible to access Linux Desktop via proprietary RDP protocol and if not how you can achieve remote GUI access to Linux?

1. Using Linux Xorg and Xming Xserver for Windows

Most people should already know of Linux ability to start multiple Xserver sessions remotely which is the native way to access between two Linux hosts or access remotely Linux from other Linux UNIX like OS. It is also possible to use xinit / startx / xhost commands to establish remotely connection to new or running Linux (Xorg) Xserver by using them in combination with XMing – XServer for Windows running on the Windows host and Debian package (x11-xserver-utils) – providing xhost cmd, however this method is a bit complicated and not so convenient.

I used to be using this method XMing (whose mirror is here), earlier in my university years to use remotely my Debian Linux from  Windows 98 and this works perfectly fine.

2. Using RDP emulation with XRDP server

in order to be able to access your desk from any friend or computer club in the world using standard available in MS Windows Remote Desktop client (mstsc.exe).
There is also another alternative way by using Windows Desktop sharing RDP experimental server xrdp:
 

apt-cache show xrdp |grep -i descr -A 3
Description: Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) server
 Based on research work by the rdesktop project, xrdp uses the Remote
 Desktop Protocol to present a graphical login to a remote client.
 xrdp can connect to a VNC server or another RDP server.

To make your Linux host accessible via RDP:

On Debian / Ubuntu etc. deb based Linux:

 

apt-get update
apt-get install xrdp

 
$ /etc/init.d/xrdp status
Checking status of Remote Desktop Protocol server xrdp                                             [ OK ]
Checking status of RDP Session Manager sesman

/etc/init.d/xrdp start

On  Fedora Linux:
 

yum -y install xrdp
systemctl enable xrdp.service
systemctl start xrdp.service
systemctl enable xrdp-sesman.service
systemctl start xrdp-sesman.service


It is possible to access remote Linux host using xrdp RDP server, but this will only work in older releases of mstsc.exe (Windows XP / Vista / 2003) and will not work on Windows 7 / 8, because in MS Windows 7 and onwards RDP proto version has changed and the client no longer has compatability with older mstsc releases. There is a work around for this for anyone who stubbornly want to use RDP protocol to access Linux host. If you want to connect to xrdp from Windows 7 you have to copy the old RDP client (mstsc.exe and mstscax.dll) from a WinXP install to the Windows 7 box and run it independently, from the default installed ones, anyways this method is time consuming and not really worthy …

3. Using the VNC withTightVNC server / client

 

Taking above in consideration, for me personally best way to access Linux host from Windows and Mac is to use simply the good old VNC protocol with TightVNC.

TightVNC is cross-platform free and open source remote Desktop client it uses RFB protocol to control another computer screen remotely.

To use tightvnc to access remote Debian / Ubuntu – deb based Linux screen, tightvncserver package has to be installed:

apt-cache show tightvncserver|grep -i desc -A 7
Description-en: virtual network computing server software
 VNC stands for Virtual Network Computing. It is, in essence, a remote
 display system which allows you to view a computing `desktop' environment
 not only on the machine where it is running, but from anywhere on the
 Internet and from a wide variety of machine architectures.

 .
 This package provides a server to which X clients can connect and the
 server generates a display that can be viewed with a vncviewer.

 

apt-get –yes install tightvncserver


TightVNCserver package is also available in default repositories of Fedora / CentOS / RHEL and most other RPM based distros, to install there:
 

yum -y install tightvnc-server


Once it is installed to make tightvncserver running you have to start it (preferrably with non-root user), usually this is the user with which you're using the system:

tightvncserver

You will require a password to access your desktops.

Password:
Verify:   
Would you like to enter a view-only password (y/n)? n

New 'X' desktop is rublev:4

Creating default startup script /home/hipo/.vnc/xstartup
Starting applications specified in /home/hipo/.vnc/xstartup
Log file is /home/hipo/.vnc/rublev:4.log

 

tightvncserver-running-in-gnome-terminal-debian-gnu-linux-wheezy-screenshot

To access now TightVncserver on the Linux host Download and Install TightVNC Viewer client

note that you need to download TightVNC Java Viewer JAR in ZIP archive – don't install 32 / 64 bit installer for Windows, as this will install and setup TightVNCServer on your Windows – and you probably don't want that (and – yes you will need to have Oracle Java VM installed) …
 

tightvnc-viewer-java-client-running-on-microsoft-windows-7-screenshot

Once unzipped run tightvnc-jviewer.jar and type in the IP address of remote Linux host and screen, where TightVNC is listening, as you can see in prior screenshot my screen is :4, because I run tightvnc to listen for connections in multiple X sessions. once you're connected you will be prompted for password, asker earlier when you run  tightvncserver cmd on Linux host.

If you happen to be on a Windows PC without Java installed or Java use is prohibited you can use TightVNC Viewer Portable Binary (mirrored here)

/images/tightvnc-viewer-portable-windows-7-desktop-screenshot

If you have troubles with connection, on Linux host check the exact port on which TightVncServer is running:
 

ps ax |grep -i Tightvnc

 8630 pts/8    S      0:02 Xtightvnc :4 -desktop X -auth /var/run/gdm3/auth-for-hipo-7dpscj/database -geometry 1024×768 -depth 24 -rfbwait 120000 -rfbauth /home/hipo/.vnc/passwd -rfbport 5904 -fp /usr/share/fonts/X11/misc/,/usr/share/fonts/X11/Type1/,/usr/share/fonts/X11/75dpi/,/usr/share/fonts/X11/100dpi/ -co /etc/X11/rgb

Then to check, whether the machine you're trying to connect from doesn't have firewall rules preventing the connection use (telnet) – if installed on the Windows host:
 

telnet www.pc-ferak.net 5904
Trying 192.168.56.101…
Connected to 192.168.56.101.
Escape character is '^]'.
RFB 003.008

telnet> quit
Connection closed.

remote-connection-via-tightvnc-to-linux-host-from-windows-7-using-tightvnc-java-client-screenshot
 

How to protect Munin Web statistics with password on GNU / Linux

Thursday, October 27th, 2011

I just installed munin to track in web the performance of few Debian servers. I’ve configured munin to open via a Virtualhosts in Apache. As its always wise to protect any statistics data about the server from the unwanted possible security violators, I decided to protect Munin with Apache .htaccess.

The munin htmldir output dir is configured to be in /var/www/munin, hence I protected my munin with password by:

1. Creating .htaccess file in /var/www/munin with following content

AuthUserFile /etc/apache2/.munin_htpasswd
AuthGroupFile /dev/null
AuthName EnterPassword
AuthType Basic

require user admin

2. Creating /etc/apache2/.munin_htpasswd with htpasswd (htaccess password generator cmd)

debian:/var/www/munin# htpasswd -c /etc/apache2/.munin_htpasswd admin
New password:
Re-type new password:
Adding password for user admin

Another important thing I had to do is set my VirtualHost file to be configured with AllowOverride All , if AllowOverride All is missing the .htaccess and .htpasswd are not red at all.
Afterwards munin is protected with password, and when my virtualdomain where munin lays e.g. http://munin.mydomain.com is accessed the .htpasswd password dialog pops up 😉