Posts Tagged ‘fi’

Improve Websites SEO: Optimize images to Increase website loading performance on Linux server – Image Compress tools

Friday, December 5th, 2014

Optimize-website-images-pictures-to-Increase-website-loading-performance-on-Linux-server_Image_Compress_tools-Improve-Websites_SEO
Part of our daily life as Web hosting system adminstrators is to constantly strive to better utilize our Linux / Windows hosting servers hardware.
Therefore it is our constant task to look for new better ways to optimize our Apache Sites and Webservers in order to return served application content light fast to keep the Boss and customers happy 🙂

There are things to tune up for better server performance and better CPU / memory utilization on both server Application server side as well as the website programming code backend, html and pictures / images

Thus it is critically important to not only keep the Webserver / PHP engine optimized but keep hosted sites  stored images and source code clean and efficient.

We as admins usually couldn't directly interfere with clearning the source code and often we have to host a crappy written sites with picture upload forms with un-optimized Image files that was  produced on old Photo Cameras, "Ancient" Mobile Mobiles, Win XP MS Paint, various versions Photoshop, Gimp etc.).

It is a well known fact that a big part from a Website User Experience is how fast the user loads a page, thus if HTML / CSS loaded images loads slow has a negative impact on user look & feel about website

Therefore by optimizing the size of hosted sites Images, you Save Network bandwidth and in some cases when Large Gallery sites HDD disk space.

On Linux, there are already a many command line tools to inspect and optimize (compress) the size of PNG, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNM, Tiff Images, most famous ones are:

  • optipng – PNG optimizer that recompresses image files to a smaller size, without losing any information.
  • jpegoptim –   lossless JPEG optimization (based on optimizing the Huffman tables) and "lossy" optimization based on setting a maximum quality factor.
  • pngcrush – Recommended tool to use by Stoyan Stefanov (Yahoo Yslow Developer)
  • jpegtran – Recommended to use by Google 
  • gifsicle –  command-line tool for creating, editing, and getting information about GIF images and animations. 

It is hence useful to first run manually availale Linux image optimization tools (to get an idea what they do) and later automate them to run as scripts to optimize server stored images size and make pictures load faster on websites and thus improve End Users Experience and speed up Image content delivery to GoogleBot / YahooBot / Bing Crawlers which will make Search Engines to position server hosted sites better (more SEO Friendly).

 

  • How much percents of  space (Mega / Gigabytes ) Pictures compress can save you?

If you run it on 500MB image directory, you can probably save about 20 to 50MB of size, so don't expect extraordinary file reduce, however 5% to 10% reduce in size is not bad too. If you host 100 sites each with half gigas of data this would mean saving of 5GB of data and some 5GB from backups 🙂 At extraordinary cases you can expect 20% to 30% of storage reduce. For even better image compression you can try out GIMP's – Save for Web option.
 

  • Installing jpegtran, optpng, jpegoptim, pngcrush gifsicle on Debian / Ubuntu (deb based) Linux
     

apt-get install –yes libjpeg-progs optipng jpegoptim pngcrush gifsicle

 

  • Installing  jpegtran, optpng, jpegoptim, pngcrush, gifsicle on Fedora / CentOS / RHEL (RPM based distros)
     

yum -y install pngcrush libjpeg-turbo-utils opt-jpg opt-png opt-gif


gifsicle is not availale by default on Redhacks 🙂 but there is a RPM package for fedora from http://pkgs.repoforge.org/gifsicle/

 

Some examples of running image compression on GNU / Linux

  • optipng and jpegoptim optimize for all files in directory
     

cd /home/sites/

find . -iname '*.png' -print0 | xargs -0 optipng -o7 -preserve
find . -iname '*.jpg' -print0 |
 xargs -0 jpegoptim –max=90 –strip-all –preserve –totals


In jpegoptim command, the option –strip-all will strip any metadata including Exif data from images. For websites JPEG metadata is usually not needed, so usually its ok to strip them.

Above jpegoptim example will decrease slightly JPEG image quality to 90%. quality level of 90 is still high enough and website visitors are unlikely to spot any visible quality reduction / defects in the image.

 

  • pngcrush all files in a directory example
     

cd /home/sites/

for png in `find $IMG_DIR -iname "*.png"`; do
    echo "crushing $png …"
        pngcrush -rem alla -reduce -brute "$png" temp.png

 

    # preserve original on error
    if [ $? = 0 ]; then
        mv -f temp.png $png
        else
        rm temp.png
        fi
done

  • Run jpegtran on sites directory
     

find /home/sites -name "*.jpg" -type f -exec jpegtran -copy none -optimize -outfile {} {} ;

 

  • Set a script to compress / reduce size of Sites Images


Here is a basic optimize_images.sh which I used earlier before and was reducing the overall images size just 5 to 10%, then I found the much improved version of optimize images shell script  (useful to  clear up EXIF picture data / And Comments from JPG / PNG files). The script execution could take very long time on large image directories and thus could cause a high HDD disk I/O, however if ran once a week at night time its not such a big deal. 

To set it to run on your server as a cronjob:
 

cd /usr/sbin/
wget -q http://www.pc-freak.net/bshscr/optimize_images2.sh
crontab -u root -e 


Sample cron job to run once a month on 10th and 27th in 3 o'clock AM:
 

 00 3 10,27 * * /usr/sbin/optimize_images2.sh 2>&1 >/dev/null


Also if you need to further optimize million of tiny sized PNG files Yahoo Smush.it service could be helpful. For compression maniacs its worthy to check out also TinyPNG Service (however be awre that this service compresses files with significant quality loss) making picture quality visibly deteriorated.

Besides optimizing server stored Pictures, here are some other stuff that helps in increasing server utilization / lower webpages loading time.

Starting up with the installation (when site is to use Apache + PHP) for its backend, the first thing to on the freshlyinstalled Linux server is to implement the following list of Apache common Timeout variables that help better scale the webserver for the CMS-es hosted, enable Webserver caching with (mod_deflate), enable eAccelerator tune PHP common php variable etc.

Other thing  I sometimes use to speed-up performance of Apache child responce time up to 20-30  is to Include into Virtualhost / httpd.conf Apache configuration any htacces mod_rewrite rules.

On too heavily loaded sites On-line stores / Large Company website portals with more than 60 000 – 100 000 unique IP visitors a day it is useful tip to disable completely Apache logging in access.log / error.log.

Often when old architecture websites are moved from older Linux OS version to a newer one with newer versions of Apache / PHP often sites are working without major code rework, but use many functions which are already obsolete and thus many WARNING messages crap is logged into php_error.log / error.log. Thus to save disk space and decrease hard disk I/O operations it is good to Disable PHP Notices and Warnings messages
 

Recommended logrorate practices on heavy loaded (busy) Apache Linux servers

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

Apache logrotate Debian good configuration for heavy loaded servers

If you are sys admin of Apache Webserver running on Debian Linux relying on logrorate to rorate logs, you might want to change the default way logroration is done.

Little changes in the way Apache log files are served on busy servers can have positive outcomes on the overall way the server CPU units burden. A good logrotation strategy can also prevent your server from occasional extra overheads or downtimes.

The way Debian GNU / Linux process logs is well planned for small servers, however the default logroration Apache routine doesn't fit well for servers which process millions of client requests each day.

I happen to administrate, few servers which are constantly under a heavy load and have occasionally overload troubles because of Debian's logrorate default mechanism.

To cope with the situation I have made few modifications to /etc/logrorate.d/apache2 and decided to share it here hoping, this might help you too.

1. Rotate Apache acccess.log log file daily instead of weekly

On Debian Apache's logrorate script is in /etc/logrotate.d/apache2

The default file content will be like so like so:

debian:~# cat /etc/logrotate.d/apache2
/var/log/apache2/*.log {
weekly
missingok
rotate 52
size 1G
compress
delaycompress
notifempty
create 640 root adm
sharedscripts
postrotate
if [ -f "`. /etc/apache2/envvars ; echo ${APACHE_PID_FILE:-/var/run/apache2.pid}`" ]; then
/etc/init.d/apache2 reload > /dev/null
fi
endscript
}

To change the rotation from weekly to daily change:

weekly

to

#weekly

2. Disable access.log log file gzip compression

By default apache2 logrotate script is tuned ot make compression of rotated file (exmpl: copy access.log to access.log.1 and gzip it, copy access.log to access.log.2 and gzip it etc.). On servers where logs are many gigabytes, once logrotate initiates its scheduled work it will have to compress an enormous log record of apache requests. On very busy Apache servers from my experience, just for a day the log could grow up to approximately 8 / 10 Gigabytes.
I'm sure there are more busy servers out there, which log files are growing to over 100GB for just a single day.
Gzipping a 100GB file piece takes an enormous load on the CPU, as well as often takes long time. When this logrotation gzipping occurs at a moment where the servers CPU cores are already heavy loaded from Apache serving HTTP requests, Apache server becomes inaccessible to most of the clients.
Then for end clients various oddities are experienced, for example Apache dropped connection errors, webserver returning empty pages, or simply inability to respond to the client browser.
Sometimes as a result of the overload, even secure shell connection to SSHD to the server is impossible …

To prevent your server from this roration overloads remove logrorate's default access.log gzipping by commenting:

compress

to

#comment

3. Change maximum log roration by logrorate to be up to 30

By default logrorate is configured to create and keep up to 52 rotated and gzipped access.log files, changing this to a lower number is a good practice (in my view), in cases where log files grow daily to 10 or more GBs. Doing so will save a lot of disk space and reduce the chance the hard disk gets filled in because of the multiple rorated ungzipped enormous access.log files.

To tune the default keep max rorated logs to 30, change:

rotate 52

torotate 30

The way logrorate's apache log processing on RHEL / CentOS Linux is working better on high load servers, by default on CentOS logrorate is not configured to do log gzipping at all.

Here is the default /etc/logrorate.d/httpd script for
CentOS release 5.6 (Final)

[hipo@centos httpd]$ cat /etc/logrotate.d/httpd /var/log/httpd/*log {
missingok
notifempty
sharedscripts
postrotate
/bin/kill -HUP `cat /var/run/httpd.pid 2>/dev/null` 2> /dev/null || true
endscript
}

 

How to clear Squid Proxy Cache on Debian and Ubuntu

Saturday, July 16th, 2011

Squid proxy cache clear logo

It was necessery to clean up some squid cache for some proxy users on a Debian host. Until now I’ve used to run only custom build Squid server on Slackware Linux.

Thus I was curious if Debian guys were smart enough to implement a proxy cache cleaning option as an option to be passed on to squid’s init script.

Honestly I was quite suprised squid clear cache option is not there;

squid-cache:~# /etc/init.d/squid3
Usage: /etc/init.d/squid3 {start|stop|reload|force-reload|restart}
squid-cache:/#

As it was not embedded into init script I still hoped, there might be some Debian way to do the proxy cache clearing, so I spend some 10 minutes checking online as well as checked in squid3‘s manual just to find there is no specific command or Debian accepted way to clean squid’s cache.

Since I couldn’t find any Debian specific, way I did it the old fashioned way 😉 (deleted directory/file structures in /var/spool/squid3/* and used squid’s -z option, to recreate the swap directories.

Here is how:

squid-cache:~# /etc/init.d/squid3 stop;
squid-cache:~# rm -Rf /var/spool/squid3/*;
squid-cache:~# squid3 -z; /etc/init.d/squid3 start

Finally I was quite amazed to realize, there was not even a crontab script to periodically clear and re-create proxy cache.

My previous experience with maintaning an office Squid proxy cache has prooved, that periodic cache clean ups are very helpful, especially to resolve issues with cached unreslovable DNS entries in the server.
Clearing up squid cache every week or something, guarantees that failure to resolve certain hosts at certain times would not stay unresolvable like forever 😉

In that manner of thougths, I decided to put the following crontab which will twice a month clear up proxy’s cache, to possibly solve some failed squid DNS issues.

squid-cache:~# crontab -u root -l > file;
echo '00 04 12,26 * * /etc/init.d/squid3 stop; rm -Rf /var/spool/squid3/*; squid3 -z; /etc/init.d/squid3 start >/dev/null 2>&1'
>> file; crontab file

By the way, implementing the squid clear cache in Debian and Ubuntu ‘s init scripts and putting a periodic proxy clear up cron, seems like a feature worthy to be proposed to the distro developers and hopefully be embbed in some of the upcoming distro releases 😉

How to generate user password for digest_pw_auth SQUID digest authentication

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

Squid Proxy pass prompt / real squid fun picture

I needed to generate new password for proxy user configured on SQUID proxy server configured with digest user authentication.
My dear colleague was kind to provide me with the below script, which generates the one line string which needs to go to the squid user password file:

#!/bin/sh
user="$1";
realm="$2";
pass="$3";
if [ -z "$1" -o -z "$2" -o -z "$3" ] ; then
echo "Usage: $0 user password 'realm'";
exit 1
fi
ha1=$(echo -n "$user:$realm:$pass"|md5sum |cut -f1 -d' ')
echo "$user:$realm:$ha1"

You can alternatively download the squid_generate_pass.sh script here

The script accepts three arguments;
proxy-server:~# ./squid_generate_pass.sh
Usage: ./squid_generate_pass.sh user password 'realm'

Thus to generate a new user and password and insert it immediately into let’s say a squid configured user/pass file in /etc/squid3/users execute command:

proxy-server:~# ./squid_generate_pass.sh admin_user MySecretPassword 'Squid_Configured_Realm'
>> /etc/squid3/users

Where Squid_Configured_Realm depends on the realm name configured in squid.conf, for example if squid.conf includes some auth configuration similar to:

auth_param digest program /usr/lib/squid3/digest_pw_auth -c /etc/squid3/users
auth_param digest children 2
auth_param digest realm My_Proxy_Realm
acl localusers proxy_auth REQUIRED

The realm script argument should be My_Proxy_realm . If squid_generate_pass does completes without errors, it should add a line to /etc/squid3/users file similar to:

proxy-server:~# cat /etc/squid3/users
admin_user:My_Proxy_realm:3bbcb35e505c52a0024ef2e3ab1910b0

Cheers 😉