Posts Tagged ‘mapper’

Apache Webserver: No space left on device: Couldn’t create accept lock /var/lock/apache2/accept.lock – Fix

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

Apache-http-server-no-space-left-on-device-semaphores-quotes-hard-disk-space-resolve-fix-howto
If out of a sudden your Apache webserver crashes and is refusing to start up by manually trying to restart it through its init script on Debian Linux servers – /etc/init.d/apache2 and RPM based ones: /etc/init.d/httpd

Checking in php_error.log there was no shown errors related to loading PHP modules, however apache's error.log show following errors:

[Wed Apr 08 14:20:14 2015] [error] [client 180.76.5.149] client denied by server configuration: /var/www/sploits/info/trojans_info/tr_data/y3190.html
[Wed Apr 08 14:20:39 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?
[Wed Apr 08 14:20:39 2015] [emerg] (28)No space left on device: Couldn't create accept lock (/var/lock/apache2/accept.lock.15974) (5)
[Wed Apr 08 14:25:39 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?
[Wed Apr 08 14:25:39 2015] [emerg] (28)No space left on device: Couldn't create accept lock (/var/lock/apache2/accept.lock.16790) (5)
[Wed Apr 08 14:27:03 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?
[Wed Apr 08 14:27:03 2015] [emerg] (28)No space left on device: Couldn't create accept lock (/var/lock/apache2/accept.lock.16826) (5)
[Wed Apr 08 14:27:53 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?
[Wed Apr 08 14:27:53 2015] [emerg] (28)No space left on device: Couldn't create accept lock (/var/lock/apache2/accept.lock.16852) (5)
[Wed Apr 08 14:30:48 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?
[Wed Apr 08 14:30:48 2015] [emerg] (28)No space left on device: Couldn't create accept lock (/var/lock/apache2/accept.lock.17710) (5)
[Wed Apr 08 14:31:21 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?
[Wed Apr 08 14:31:21 2015] [emerg] (28)No space left on device: Couldn't create accept lock (/var/lock/apache2/accept.lock.17727) (5)
[Wed Apr 08 14:32:40 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?
[Wed Apr 08 14:32:40 2015] [emerg] (28)No space left on device: Couldn't create accept lock (/var/lock/apache2/accept.lock.17780) (5)
[Wed Apr 08 14:38:32 2015] [warn] pid file /var/run/apache2.pid overwritten — Unclean shutdown of previous Apache run?

As you can read the most likely reason behind above errors preventing for apache to start is /var/run/apache2.pid  unable to be properly written due to lack of disk space or due to disk quota set for users including for userID with which Apache is running.

First thing I did is of course to see how much free space is on the server:

df -h
Filesystem                     Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/vg00-rootvol       4.0G  1.7G  2.2G  44% /
udev                           7.8G  204K  7.8G   1% /dev
tmpfs                           24G     0   24G   0% /dev/shm
/dev/sda1                      486M   40M  422M   9% /boot
/dev/mapper/vg00-lv_crashdump 1008M   34M  924M   4% /crashdump
/dev/mapper/vg00-homevol       496M   26M  445M   6% /home
/dev/mapper/vg00-lv_opt         12G  1.4G  9.9G  13% /opt
/dev/mapper/vg00-tmpvol        2.0G   68M  1.9G   4% /tmp
/dev/mapper/vg00-varvol        7.9G  609M  6.9G   8% /var
/dev/mapper/vg00-crashvol      1.9G   35M  1.8G   2% /var/crash
/dev/mapper/vg00-auditvol      124M  5.6M  113M   5% /var/log/audit
/dev/mapper/vg00-webdienste     60G   12G   48G  19% /webservice

 

As visible from above df command output , there is enough disk on HDD, so this is definitely not the issue:

Then I Checked whether there is Quota enabled on the Linux server with repquota command shows there are no quotas enabled:

# repquota / var/
repquota: Mountpoint (or device) / not found or has no quota enabled.
repquota: Mountpoint (or device) /var not found or has no quota enabled.
repquota: Not all specified mountpoints are using quota.

 

So obviously the only few left possible reason for Apache failing to start after invoked via init script is  either due to left tainted semaphores or due to some server hardware  RAM problem / or a dying  hard disk with bad blocks.

So what are Semaphores? Generally speaking Semaphores are apparatus for conveying information by means of visual signals between applications (something like sockets).They're used for communicating between the active processes of a certain application. In the case of Apache, they’re used to communicate between the parent and child processes, hence if Apache can’t properly write and coordinate these things down, then it can’t communicate properly with all of the processes it starts and hence the Main HTTPD process can't spawn probably its childs preventing Webserver to enter "started mode" and write its PID file.

To check general information about system semaphore arrays there is the ipcs -s command, however my experience is that ipcs -a is more useful (because it lists generally all kind of semaphores) including Semaphore Shared Memory Signals which are the most likely to cause you the problem.

ipcs -a

—— Shared Memory Segments ——–
key        shmid      owner      perms      bytes      nattch     status

—— Semaphore Arrays ——–
key        semid      owner      perms      nsems
0x00000000 22970368   www-data   600        1

—— Message Queues ——–
key        msqid      owner      perms      used-bytes   messages

As you see in my case there is a Semaphore Arrays which had to be cleaned to make Apache2 be able to start again.
 

To clean all left semaphores (arrays) preventing Apache from start properly, use below for one liner bash loop:
 

for i in `ipcs -s | awk '/www-data/ {print $2}'`; do (ipcrm -s $i); done
ipcrm -m 0x63637069


Note that above for loop is specific to Debian on CentOS / Fedora / RHEL and other Linuxes the username with which stucked semaphores might stay will be apache or httpd

Depending on the user with which the Apache Webserver is running, run above loop like so:

For RPM based distros (CentOS / RHEL):

 

for i in `ipcs -s | awk '/apache/ {print $2}'`; do (ipcrm -s $i); done
ipcrm -m 0x63637069


For other distros such as Slackware or FreeBSD or any custom compiled Apache webserver:

for i in `ipcs -s | awk '/httpd/ {print $2}'`; do (ipcrm -s $i); done
ipcrm -m 0x63637069


If there is also Shared Memory Segments you can remove them with ipcrm i.e.:

ipcrm -m 0x63637069


An alternative way to get rid of left uncleaned semaphores is with xargs:
 

ipcs -s | grep nobody | awk ‘ { print $2 } ‘ | xargs ipcrm


Even though this fixes the issue I understood my problems were due to exceeding semaphores, to check default number of set semaphores on Linux Kernel level as well as few Semaphore related values run below sysctl:

sysctl -a | egrep kernel.sem\|kernel.msgmni
kernel.msgmni = 15904

kernel.sem = 250        32000   32      128


As you can see the number of maximum semaphores is quite large so in my case the failure because of left semaphores was most likely due to some kind of Cracker / Automated bot scanner attack or someone trying malicious against the webserver or simply because of some kind of Apache bug or enormous high load the server faced.

PortQRY Native Windows command line Nmap like port scanner – Check status of remote host ports on Windows

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Windows_command_line_and_gui_port-scanner-portqry-like-nmap-check-status-of-remote-host-service-windows-xp-7-2000-2003-2008-server
Linux users know pretty well Nmap (network mapper) tool which is precious in making a quick server host security evaluation.
Nmap binary port is available for Windows too, however as nmap is port for its normal operation you have to install WinPcap (Packet Capture Library).
And more importantly it is good to mention if you need to do some remote port scanning from Windows host, there is Microsoft produced native tool called PortQry (Port Query).

PortQRY is a must have tool for the Windows Admin as it can help you troubleshoot multiple network issues.

windows-nmap-native-alternative-portqry-gui-ui-web-service-port-scan-screenshot
As of time of writting this post PortQRY is at version 2, PortQRY tool has also a GUI (UI) Version for those lazy to type in command line.

Port Query UI tool (portqueryui.exe) is a tool to query open ports on a machine. This tool makes use of command line version port query tool (portqry.exe). The UI provides the following functionalities:

   1. Following "Enter destination IP or FQDN to query:”, an edit box needs the user to specify the IP address or FDQN name of the destination to query port status.

   2. The end user is able to choose Query type:

        – Predefined services type. It groups ports into service, so that you can query multiple ports for a service by a single click. Service includes "Domains and Trusts", "DNS Queries", "NetBIOS     communication", "IPSEC", "Networking", "SQL Service", "WEB Service", "Exchange Server",          "Netmeeting", and other services.

You can check detail port and protocol info for each service category by opening Help -> Predefined Services…

PORTQRY is part of Windows Server 2003 Support Tools and can be added to any NT based Windows (XP, 2003, Vista, 7, 8)
 You can download portqry command line tool here or my mirrored portqry version command line port scanner here and PortQRY UI here.

PortQRY comes in PortQryV2.exe package which when run extracts 3 files: PortQry.exe program, EULA and readme file. Quickest way to make portqry globally accessible from win command prompt is to copy it to %SystemRoot% (The environment variable holding default location for Windows Installation directory).
It is good idea to add PortQRY to default PATH folder to make it accessible from command line globally.

PorQry has 3 modes of operation:

Command Line Mode, Interactive Mode and Local Mode

portqry-windows-native-security-port-network-scanner-nmap-equivalent-help-screenshot
 

Command Line Mode – is when it is invoked with parameters.

Interactive Mode is when it runs in interactive CLI console

portqry-windows-native-security-port-network-scanner-nmap-equivalent-interactive-mode-screenshot

portqry-windows-native-security-port-network-scanner-nmap-equivalent-interactive-mode-help-screenshot
and Local Mode is used whether information on local system ports is required.

portqry-windows-native-security-port-network-scanner-nmap-equivalent-local-mode-screenshot


Here are some examples on basic usage of portqry:
 

1. Check if remote server is running webserver is listening on (HTTPS protocol) TCP port 80

portqry -n servername -e 80
 

Querying target system called:

 pc-freak.net

Attempting to resolve name to IP address…


Name resolved to 83.228.93.76

querying…

TCP port 80 (http service): FILTERED

2. Check whether some common Samba sharing and DNS UDP ports are listening

portqry -n servername -p UDP -o 37,53,88,135
 

Querying target system called:

servername

Attempting to resolve name to IP address…


Name resolved to 74.125.21.100

querying…

UDP port 37 (time service): NOT LISTENING

UDP port 53 (domain service): NOT LISTENING

UDP port 88 (kerberos service): NOT LISTENING

UDP port 135 (epmap service): NOT LISTENING

3. Scan open ports in a port range – Check common services port range (port 1-1024)

portqry -n 192.168.1.20 -r 1:1024 | find ": LISTENING"

4. Logging network scan output to file

Portqry –n localhost –e 135 -l port135.txt
 

Querying target system called:

 localhost

Attempting to resolve name to IP address…


Name resolved to 127.0.0.1

querying…

TCP port 135 (epmap service): LISTENING

Using ephemeral source port
Querying Endpoint Mapper Database…
Server's response:

UUID: d95afe70-a6d5-4259-822e-2c84da1ddb0d
ncacn_ip_tcp:localhost[49152]

UUID: 2f5f6521-cb55-1059-b446-00df0bce31db Unimodem LRPC Endpoint
ncacn_np:localhost[PIPEwkssvc]

Total endpoints found: 38


5. Scanning UDP and TCP protocols port

PortQry -n www.pc-freak.net -e 25 -p both

 

Querying target system called:

 www.pc-freak.net

Attempting to resolve name to IP address…


Name resolved to 83.228.93.76

querying…

TCP port 53 (domain service): LISTENING

UDP port 53 (domain service): LISTENING or FILTERED

Sending DNS query to UDP port 53…

 

6. Checking remote server whether LDAP ports are listening

Portqry -remotehost.com -p tcp -e 389
Portqry -n remotehost.com -p tcp -e 636
Portqry -n remotehost.com -p both -e 3268
Portqry -n remotehost.com -p tcp -e 3269


7. Making SNMP community name requests

portqry -n host2 -cn !my community name! -e 161 -p udp


8. Initiating scan from pre-selected source port

A network socket request initiation is useful from certain port because, some remote services expect connection from certain ports, lets say you're connecting to mail server, you might want to set as a source port – port 25, to make remote server another SMTP is connecting.

portqry -n www.pc-freak.net -e 25 -sp 25


9. Scanning whether server ports required by Active Directories are opened

Common ports used in Windows hosts to communicate between each other to sustain Active Directory are:

88 (Kerberos)
135 (RPC)
389 (LDAP)
445 (CIFS)
3268 (Global Catalog)

portqry -n remote-host.com -o 88,135,389,445,3268 -p both

portqry has also a silent mode with the "-q" switch if you want to get only whether a port is LISTENING (opened).

On port scan it returns three major return codes (very useful for scripting purposes);

  • returncode 0 – if port / service is listening
  • returncode 1 – if service is not listening
  • returncode 2 – if service is listening or filtered

PortQry is very simple port scanner for win sysadms and is precious tool for basic network debugging (services)  on Windows farms, however it doesn't have the powerful cracker functionality, application / OS versioning etc. like Nmap.

 

How to check /dev/ partition disk labeling in Debian GNU / Linux

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

The usual way that one is supposed to check a certain partition let’s say /dev/sda1 disk UUID (Universal Unique Identifier) label is through a command:
vol_id /dev/sda1

For reason however Debian does not include vol_id command. To check the UUID assigned disk labels on Debian one should use another command called blkid (part of util-linux deb package).

blkid will list all block device attributes so it doesn’t specifically, passing any partition as argument.
Here is an example output of blkid :

server:/root# blkid
/dev/sda1: UUID="cdb1836e-b7a2-4cc7-b666-8d2aa31b2da4" SEC_TYPE="ext2" TYPE="ext3"
/dev/sda5: UUID="c67d6d43-a48f-43ff-9d65-7c707a57dfe6" TYPE="swap"
/dev/sdb1: UUID="e324ec28-cf04-4e2e-8953-b6a8e6482425" TYPE="ext2"
/dev/sdb5: UUID="1DWe0F-Of9d-Sl1J-8pXW-PLpy-Wf9s-SsyZfQ" TYPE="LVM2_member"
/dev/mapper/computer-root: UUID="fbdfc19e-6ec8-4000-af8a-cde62926e395" TYPE="ext3"
/dev/mapper/computer-swap_1: UUID="e69100ab-9ef4-45df-a6aa-886a981e5f26" TYPE="swap"
/dev/mapper/computer-home: UUID="2fe446da-242d-4cca-8b2c-d23c76fa27ec" TYPE="ext3"