Posts Tagged ‘netstat’

Change Linux Wireless Access Point connection from text terminal with iwconfig

Monday, October 8th, 2018

wireless-change-wireless-network-to-connect-to-using-console

If you have configured a couple of Wireless connections at home or work on your Laptop  and each of the remote Wi-FI access points are at different distance (some APs are situated at closer range than others) and your Linux OS keeps connecting sometimes to the wrong AP by default you'll perhaps want to change that behavior, so you keep connected to the Wi-Fi AP that has the best Link Quality (is situatated physically at closest location to your laptop integrated wifi card).
Using a Graphical tool such as Gnome Network Manager / Wicd Network Manager or KDE's Network Manager is great and easy way to do it but sometimes if you do upgrade of your GNU / Linux and the upgrade fails and your Graphical Environment GNOME / KDE / OpenBox / Window Maker or whatever Window Manager you use fails to start it is super handy to use text console (terminal) to connect to the right wiki in order to do a deb / rpm package rollback to revert your GUI environment or Xorg to the older working release.

Connection to WPA or WEP protected APs on GNU / Linux on a low level is done by /sbin/iwlist , /sbin/iwconfig and wpa_supplicant

wpasupplicant and network-manager (if you're running Xorg server).

 

/sbin/iwlist scan
 

 

wlp3s0    Scan completed :
          Cell 01 – Address: 10:FE:ED:43:CB:0E
                    Channel:6
                    Frequency:2.437 GHz (Channel 6)
                    Quality=64/70  Signal level=-46 dBm  
                    Encryption key:on
                    ESSID:"Magdanoz"
                    Bit Rates:1 Mb/s; 2 Mb/s; 5.5 Mb/s; 11 Mb/s; 6 Mb/s
                              9 Mb/s; 12 Mb/s; 18 Mb/s
                    Bit Rates:24 Mb/s; 36 Mb/s; 48 Mb/s; 54 Mb/s
                    Mode:Master
                    Extra:tsf=00000032cff7c214
                    Extra: Last beacon: 144ms ago
                    IE: Unknown: 00084D616764616E6F7A
                    IE: Unknown: 010882848B960C121824
                    IE: Unknown: 030106
                    IE: Unknown: 0706555320010B1B
                    IE: Unknown: 2A0100
                    IE: IEEE 802.11i/WPA2 Version 1
                        Group Cipher : TKIP
                        Pairwise Ciphers (2) : CCMP TKIP
                        Authentication Suites (1) : PSK
                    IE: Unknown: 32043048606C

 

iwlist command is used to get more detailed wireless info from a wireless interface (in terminal this command shows you the wifi networks available to connect to and various info such as the type of Wifi network the Wifi Name / network quality Frequency (is it it spreading the wifi signal at 2.4 Ghz or 5 Ghz frequency) etc.

 

# ifconfig interafce_name down

 

For example on my Thinkpad the wifi interface is wlp3s0 to check what is yours do ifconfig -a e.g.

 

root@jeremiah:~# /sbin/ifconfig -a
enp0s25: flags=4099<UP,BROADCAST,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        ether 00:21:cc:cc:b2:27  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0
        device interrupt 20  memory 0xf3900000-f3920000  

 

lo: flags=73<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING>  mtu 65536
        inet 127.0.0.1  netmask 255.0.0.0
        inet6 ::1  prefixlen 128  scopeid 0x10<host>
        loop  txqueuelen 1  (Local Loopback)
        RX packets 350  bytes 28408 (27.7 KiB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 350  bytes 28408 (27.7 KiB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

wlp3s0: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 192.168.0.103  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 192.168.0.255
        inet6 fe80::6267:20ff:fe3c:20ec  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 60:67:20:3c:20:ec  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 299735  bytes 362561115 (345.7 MiB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 1  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 278518  bytes 96996135 (92.5 MiB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

 

Next use iwconfig on Debian / Ubuntu Linux it is part of wireless-tools deb package.

 

root@jeremiah:~# /sbin/iwconfig interface essid "Your-Acess-Point-name"

 

To check whether you're connected to a wireless network you can do:

http://pc-freak.net/images/check-wireless-frequency-access-point-mac-and-wireless-name-iwconfig-linux

root@jeremiah:~# iwconfig
enp0s25   no wireless extensions.

 

lo        no wireless extensions.

wlp3s0    IEEE 802.11  ESSID:"Magdanoz"  
          Mode:Managed  Frequency:2.437 GHz  Access Point: 10:FE:ED:43:CB:0E   
          Bit Rate=150 Mb/s   Tx-Power=15 dBm   
          Retry short limit:7   RTS thr:off   Fragment thr:off
          Encryption key:off
          Power Management:off
          Link Quality=61/70  Signal level=-49 dBm  
          Rx invalid nwid:0  Rx invalid crypt:0  Rx invalid frag:0
          Tx excessive retries:5  Invalid misc:1803   Missed beacon:0


N.B. ! To get a list of all your PC network interfaces you can use cmd:

 

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# ls -al /sys/class/net/
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 .
drwxr-xr-x 52 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 ..
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 enp0s25 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:19.0/net/enp0s25
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 lo -> ../../devices/virtual/net/lo
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root 0 Oct  8 22:53 wlp3s0 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1c.1/0000:03:00.0/net/wlp3s0

show-all-network-interfaces-with-netstat-linux

or use netstat like so:

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# netstat -i | column -t
Kernel   Interface  table
Iface    MTU        RX-OK   RX-ERR  RX-DRP  RX-OVR  TX-OK   TX-ERR  TX-DRP  TX-OVR  Flg
enp0s25  1500       0       0       0       0       0       0       0       0       BMU
lo       65536      590     0       0       0       590     0       0       0       LRU
wlp3s0   1500       428112  0       1       0       423538  0       0       0       BMRU

 


To get only the Wireless network card interface on Linux (e.g. find out which of the listed above interfaces is your wireless adapter's name), use iw command (that shows devices and their configuration):

 

root@jeremiah:/home/hipo# iw dev
phy#0
    Interface wlp3s0
        ifindex 3
        wdev 0x1
        addr 60:67:20:3c:20:ec
        type managed
        channel 6 (2437 MHz), width: 40 MHz, center1: 2427 MHz
        txpower 15.00 dBm

 

linux-wireless-terminal-console-check-wireless-interfaces-command

  • If you need to get only the active Wireless adapter device assigned by Linux kernel

 

root@jeremiah:~# iw dev | awk '$1=="Interface"{print $2}'

 

To check the IP / Netmask and Broadcase address assigned by connected Access Point use ifconfig
with your Laptop Wireless Interface Name.

show-extra-information-ip-netmask-broadcast-about-wireless-interface-linux

root@jeremiah:~# /sbin/ifconfig wlp3s0
wlp3s0: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 192.168.0.103  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 192.168.0.255
        inet6 fe80::6267:20ff:fe3c:20ec  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 60:67:20:3c:20:ec  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 319534  bytes 365527097 (348.5 MiB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 1  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 285464  bytes 99082701 (94.4 MiB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0


As you can see in above 3 examples iwconfig could configure various settings regarding the wireless network interface.

It is really annoying because sometimes if you have configured your Linux to connect to multiple access points, the wifi adapter might keep connecting to an access point that is more distanced from you and because of that the Bandwidth might be slower and that could impact your Internet connectivity, to fix that and get rid of any networks that are automatically set to connect to that you don't want to, just delete the correspodning files (the Wifi file name coincides with the Wireless AP network name).
All stored Wi-FI access points that your Linux is configured to connect to are stored inside /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/

For example to delete an auto connection to wireless router with a name NetGear do:

 

root@jeremiah:~# rm -f /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/NetGear

 

For a complete list of stored Wifi Networks that your PC might connect (and authorize to if configured so) do:

 

root@jeremiah:~# ls -a /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/
Magdanoz
NetGear

LinkSys
Cobra
NetIs
WirelessNet

 

After deleting the required Networks you want your computer to not automatically connect to to make NetworkManager aware of that restart it with:
 

hipo@jeremiah:~# systemctl restart NetworkManager.service


or if you hate systemd like I do just use the good old init script to restart:

 

hipo@jeremiah:~# /etc/init.d/network-manager restart


To get some more informatoin on the exact network you're connected, you can run:

show-information-about-wireless-connection-on-gnu-linux

 

hipo@jeremiah:~# systemctl status NetworkManager.service
● NetworkManager.service – Network Manager
   Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/NetworkManager.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Mon 2018-10-08 22:35:09 EEST; 15s ago
     Docs: man:NetworkManager(8)
 Main PID: 13721 (NetworkManager)
    Tasks: 5 (limit: 4915)
   CGroup: /system.slice/NetworkManager.service
           ├─13721 /usr/sbin/NetworkManager –no-daemon
           └─13742 /sbin/dhclient -d -q -sf /usr/lib/NetworkManager/nm-dhcp-helper -pf /var/run/dhclient-wlp3s0.pid -lf /var/lib/NetworkManager/dhclie

 

Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:   [1539027315.6657] dhcp4 (wlp3s0): state changed unknown -> bound
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah dhclient[13742]: bound to 192.168.0.103 — renewal in 2951 seconds.
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6735] device (wlp3s0): state change: ip-config -> ip-check (reason 'none') [70 80
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6744] device (wlp3s0): state change: ip-check -> secondaries (reason 'none') [80 9
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6747] device (wlp3s0): state change: secondaries -> activated (reason 'none') [90
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6749] manager: NetworkManager state is now CONNECTED_LOCAL
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6812] manager: NetworkManager state is now CONNECTED_GLOBAL
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6813] policy: set 'Magdanoz' (wlp3s0) as default for IPv4 routing and DNS
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6816] device (wlp3s0): Activation: successful, device activated.
Oct 08 22:35:15 jeremiah NetworkManager[13721]:
  [1539027315.6823] manager: startup complete

 

Top AIX UNIX Performance tracking commands every Linux admin / user should know

Monday, March 16th, 2015

IBM_AIX_UNIX-Performance-Tracking-every-commands-Linux-sysadmin-and-user-should-know-AIX_logo

Though IBM AIX is basicly UNIX OS and many of the standard Linux commands are same or similar to AIX's if you happen to be a Linux sysadmin and you've been given some 100 AIX servers,  you will have to invest some time to read on AIX, however as a starter you should be aware to at least be able to do performance tracking on system to prevent system overloads. If that's the case I advise you check thoroughfully below commands documentation.

fcstat – Displays statistics gathered by the specified Fibre Channel device driver

filemon – Performance statistics for files, logical/physical volumes and virtual memory segments

fileplace – Displays the placement of file blocks within logical or physical volumes.

entstat – Displays the statistics gathered by the specified Ethernet device driver

iostat – Statistics for ttys, disks and cpu ipcs – Status of interprocess communication facilities

lsps – Statistics about paging space

netstat – Shows network status

netpmon – Performance statistics for CPU usage, network device-driver I/O, socket calls & NFS

nfsstat – Displays information about NFS and RPC calls

pagesize – Displays system page size ps – Display status of current processes

pstat – Statistics about system attributes

sar – System Activity Recorder

svmon – Captures a snapshot of the current contents of both real and virtual memory

traceroute – intended for use in network testing, measurement, and management.

tprof – Detailed profile of CPU usage by an application vmstat – Statistics about virtual memory and cpu/hard disk usage

topas – AIX euqivalent of Linux top command

Here are also useful examples use of above AIX performance tracking commands

To display the statistics for Fiber Channel device driver fcs0, enter:

fcstat fcs0

To monitor the activity at all file system levels and write a verbose report to the fmon.out file, enter:

filemon -v -o fmon.out -O all

To display all information about the placement of a file on its physical volumes, enter:

fileplace -piv data1

To display a continuous disk report at two second intervals for the disk with the logical name disk1, enter the following command:

iostat -d disk1 2

To display extended drive report for all disks, enter the following command:

iostat -D

To list the characteristics of all paging spaces, enter:

lsps -a

List All Ports (both listening and non listening ports)

netstat -a | more

The netpmon command uses the trace facility to obtain a detailed picture of network activity during a time interval.

netpmon -o /tmp/netpmon.log -O all;

netpfmon is very much like AIX Linux equivalent of tcpdump To print all of the supported page size with an alphabetical suffix, enter:

pagesize -af

To display the i-nodes of the system dump saved in the dumpfile core file

pstat -i dumpfile

To report current tty activity for each 2 seconds for the next 40 seconds, enter the following command:

sar -y -r 2 20

To watch system unit for 10 minutes and sort data, enter the following command:

sar -o temp 60 10

To report processor activity for the first two processors, enter the following command:

sar -u -P 0,1

To display global statistics for virtual memory in a one line format every minute for 30 minutes, enter the following command:

svmon -G -O summary=longreal -i 60 30

The traceroute command is intended for use in network testing, measurement, and management. While the ping command confirms IP network reachability, you cannot pinpoint and improve some isolated problems

traceroute aix1

Basic global program and thread-level summary / Reports processor usage

prof -x sleep 10

Single process level profiling

tprof -u -p workload -x workload

Reports virtual memory statistics

vmstat 10 10

To display fork statistics, enter the following command:

vmstat -f

To display the count of various events, enter the following command: vmstat -s To display the count of various events, enter the following command:

vmstat -s

To display time-stamp next to each column of output of vmstat, enter the following command:

vmstat -t

To display the I/O oriented view with an alternative set of columns, enter the following command:

vmstat -I

To display all the VMM statistics available, enter the following command:

vmstat -vs


If you already have some experience with some BSD (OpenBSD or FreeBSD) you will feel much more confortable with AIX as both operating system share common ancestor OS (UNIX System V), actually IBM AIX is U. System V with 4.3 BSD compatible extensions. As AIX was the first OS to introduce file system journalling, journalling capabilities on AIX are superb. AIX was and is still widely used by IBM for their mainframes, on IBM RS/6000 series (in 1990s), nowdays it runs fine on PowerPC-based systems and IA-64 systems.
For GUI loving users which end up on AIX try out SMIT (System Management Interface tool for AIX). AIX was using bash shell in prior versions up to AIX 3 but in recent releases default shell is Korn Shell (ksh88).
Nowdays AIX just like HP-UX and rest of commercial UNICes are loosing ground as most of functionalities is provided by commercial Linux distributions like RHEL so most of clients including Banks and big business clients are migrating to Linux.


Happy AIX-ing ! 🙂

How to check the IP address of Skype (user / Contacts) on GNU / Linux with netstat and whois

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

netstat check skype contact IP info with netstat Linux xterm Debian Linux

Before I explain how netstat and whois commands can be used to check information about a remote skype user – e.g. (skype msg is send or receved) in Skype. I will say in a a few words ( abstract level ), how skype P2P protocol is designed.
Many hard core hackers, certainly know how skype operates, so if this is the case just skip the boring few lines of explanation on how skype proto works.

In short skype transfers its message data as most people know in Peer-to-Peer "mode" (P2P)  – p2p is unique with this that it doesn't require a a server to transfer data from one peer to another. Most classical use of p2p networks in the free software realm are the bittorrents.

Skype way of connecting to peer client to other peer client is done via a so called "transport points". To make a P-to-P connection skype wents through a number of middle point destinations. This transport points (peers) are actually other users logged in Skype and the data between point A and point B is transferred via this other logged users in encrypted form. If a skype messages has to be transferred  from Peer A (point A) to Peer B (Point B) or (the other way around), the data flows in a way similar to:

 A -> D -> F -> B

or

B -> F -> D -> A

(where D and F are simply other people running skype on their PCs).
The communication from a person A to person B chat in Skype hence, always passes by at least few other IP addresses which are owned by some skype users who happen to be located in the middle geographically between the real geographic location of A (the skype peer sender) and B (The skype peer receiver)..

The exact way skypes communicate is way more complex, this basics however should be enough to grasp the basic skype proto concept for most ppl …

In order to find the IP address to a certain skype contact – one needs to check all ESTABLISHED connections of type skype protocol with netsat within the kernel network stack (connection) queue.

netstat displays few IPs, when skype proto established connections are grepped:

noah:~# netstat -tupan|grep -i skype | grep -i established| grep -v '0.0.0.0'
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:59677 212.72.192.8:58401 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:49096 213.199.179.161:40029 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:57896 87.120.255.10:57063 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype

Now, as few IPs are displayed, one needs to find out which exactly from the list of the ESTABLISHED IPs is the the Skype Contact from whom are received or to whom are sent the messages in question.

The blue colored IP address:port is the local IP address of my host running the Skype client. The red one is the IP address of the remote skype host (Skype Name) to which messages are transferred (in the the exact time the netstat command was ran.

The easiest way to find exactly which, from all the listed IP is the IP address of the remote person is to send multiple messages in a low time interval (let's say 10 secs / 10 messages to the remote Skype contact).

It is a hard task to write 10 msgs for 10 seconds and run 10 times a netstat in separate terminal (simultaneously). Therefore it is a good practice instead of trying your reflex, to run a tiny loop to delay 1 sec its execution and run the prior netstat cmd.

To do so open a new terminal window and type:

noah:~# for i in $(seq 1 10); do \
sleep 1; echo '-------'; \
netstat -tupan|grep -i skype | grep -i established| grep -v '0.0.0.0'; \
done

-------
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:55119 87.126.71.94:26309 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype
-------
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:49096 213.199.179.161:40029 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:55119 87.126.71.94:26309 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype
-------
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:49096 213.199.179.161:40029 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype
tcp 0 0 192.168.2.134:55119 87.126.71.94:26309 ESTABLISHED 3606/skype
...

You see on the first netstat (sequence) exec, there is only 1 IP address to which a skype connection is established, once I sent some new messages to my remote skype friend, another IP immediatelly appeared. This other IP is actually the IP of the person to whom, I'm sending the "probe" skype messages.
Hence, its most likely the skype chat at hand is with a person who has an IP address of the newly appeared 213.199.179.161

Later to get exact information on who owns 213.199.179.161 and administrative contact info as well as address of the ISP or person owning the IP, do a RIPE  whois

noah:~# whois 213.199.179.161
% This is the RIPE Database query service.
% The objects are in RPSL format.
%
% The RIPE Database is subject to Terms and Conditions.
% See http://www.ripe.net/db/support/db-terms-conditions.pdf

% Note: this output has been filtered.
% To receive output for a database update, use the "-B" flag.
% Information related to '87.126.0.0 - 87.126.127.255'
inetnum: 87.126.0.0 - 87.126.127.255
netname: BTC-BROADBAND-NET-2
descr: BTC Broadband Service
country: BG
admin-c: LG700-RIPE
tech-c: LG700-RIPE
tech-c: SS4127-RIPE
status: ASSIGNED PA
mnt-by: BT95-ADM
mnt-domains: BT95-ADM
mnt-lower: BT95-ADM
source: RIPE # Filteredperson: Lyubomir Georgiev
.....

Note that this method of finding out the remote Skype Name IP to whom a skype chat is running is not always precise.

If for instance you tend to chat to many people simultaneously in skype, finding the exact IPs of each of the multiple Skype contacts will be a very hard not to say impossible task.
Often also by using netstat to capture a Skype Name you're in chat with, there might be plenty of "false positive" IPs..
For instance, Skype might show a remote Skype contact IP correct but still this might not be the IP from which the remote skype user is chatting, as the remote skype side might not have a unique assigned internet IP address but might use his NET connection over a NAT or DMZ.

The remote skype user might be hard or impossible to track also if skype client is run over skype tor proxy for the sake of anonymity
Though it can't be taken as granted that the IP address obtained would be 100% correct with the netstat + whois method, in most cases it is enough to give (at least approximate) info on a Country and City origin of the person you're skyping with.
 

How to check if your Linux WebServer is under a DoS attack

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

There are few commands I usually use to track if my server is possibly under a Denial of Service attack or under Distributed Denial of Service

Sys Admins who still have not experienced the terrible times of being under a DoS attack are happy people for sure …

1. How to Detect a TCP/IP Denial of Service Attack This are the commands I use to find out if a loaded Linux server is under a heavy DoS attack, one of the most essential one is of course netstat.
To check if a server is under a DoS attack with netstat, it’s common to use:

linux:~# netstat -ntu | awk '{print $5}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -n|wc -l

If the output of below command returns a result like 2000 or 3000 connections!, then obviously it’s very likely the server is under a DoS attack.

To check all the IPS currently connected to the Apache Webserver and get a very brief statistics on the number of times each of the IPs connected to my server, I use the cmd:

linux:~# netstat -ntu | awk '{print $5}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
221 80.143.207.107 233 145.53.103.70 540 82.176.164.36

As you could see from the above command output the IP 80.143.207.107 is either connected 221 times to the server or is in state of connecting or disconnecting to the node.

Another possible way to check, if a Linux or BSD server is under a Distributed DoS is with the list open files command lsof
Here is how lsof can be used to list the approximate number of ESTABLISHED connections to port 80.

linux:~# lsof -i TCP:80
litespeed 241931 nobody 17u IPv4 18372655 TCP server.pc-freak.net:http (LISTEN)
litespeed 241931 nobody 25u IPv4 18372659 TCP 85.17.159.89:http (LISTEN)
litespeed 241931 nobody 30u IPv4 29149647 TCP server.pc-freak.net:http->83.101.6.41:54565 (ESTABLISHED)
litespeed 241931 nobody 33u IPv4 18372647 TCP 85.17.159.93:http (LISTEN)
litespeed 241931 nobody 34u IPv4 29137514 TCP server.pc-freak.net:http->83.101.6.41:50885 (ESTABLISHED)
litespeed 241931 nobody 35u IPv4 29137831 TCP server.pc-freak.net:http->83.101.6.41:52312 (ESTABLISHED)
litespeed 241931 nobody 37w IPv4 29132085 TCP server.pc-freak.net:http->83.101.6.41:50000 (ESTABLISHED)

Another way to get an approximate number of established connections to let’s say Apache or LiteSpeed webserver with lsof can be achieved like so:

linux:~# lsof -i TCP:80 |wc -l
2100

I find it handy to keep track of above lsof command output every few secs with gnu watch , like so:

linux:~# watch "lsof -i TCP:80"

2. How to Detect if a Linux server is under an ICMP SMURF attack

ICMP attack is still heavily used, even though it’s already old fashioned and there are plenty of other Denial of Service attack types, one of the quickest way to find out if a server is under an ICMP attack is through the command:

server:~# while :; do netstat -s| grep -i icmp | egrep 'received|sent' ; sleep 1; done
120026 ICMP messages received
1769507 ICMP messages sent
120026 ICMP messages received
1769507 ICMP messages sent

As you can see the above one liner in a loop would check for sent and recieved ICMP packets every few seconds, if there are big difference between in the output returned every few secs by above command, then obviously the server is under an ICMP attack and needs to hardened.

3. How to detect a SYN flood with netstat

linux:~# netstat -nap | grep SYN | wc -l
1032

1032 SYNs per second is quite a high number and except if the server is not serving let’s say 5000 user requests per second, therefore as the above output reveals it’s very likely the server is under attack, if however I get results like 100/200 SYNs, then obviously there is no SYN flood targetting the machine 😉

Another two netstat command application, which helps determining if a server is under a Denial of Service attacks are:

server:~# netstat -tuna |wc -l
10012

and

server:~# netstat -tun |wc -l
9606

Of course there also some other ways to check the count the IPs who sent SYN to the webserver, for example:

server:~# netstat -n | grep :80 | grep SYN |wc -l

In many cases of course the top or htop can be useful to find, if many processes of a certain type are hanging around.

4. Checking if UDP Denial of Service is targetting the server

server:~# netstat -nap | grep 'udp' | awk '{print $5}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort |uniq -c |sort -n

The above command will list information concerning possible UDP DoS.

The command can easily be accustomed also to check for both possible TCP and UDP denial of service, like so:

server:~# netstat -nap | grep 'tcp|udp' | awk '{print $5}' | cut -d: -f1 | sort |uniq -c |sort -n
104 109.161.198.86
115 112.197.147.216
129 212.10.160.148
227 201.13.27.137
3148 91.121.85.220

If after getting an IP that has too many connections to the server and is almost certainly a DoS host you would like to filter this IP.

You can use the /sbin/route command to filter it out, using route will probably be a better choice instead of iptables, as iptables would load up the CPU more than simply cutting the route to the server.

Here is how I remove hosts to not be able to route packets to my server:

route add 110.92.0.55 reject

The above command would null route the access of IP 110.92.0.55 to my server.

Later on to look up for a null routed IP to my host, I use:

route -n |grep -i 110.92.0.55

Well hopefully this should be enough to give a brief overview on how, one can dig in his server and find if he is under a Distributed Denial of Service, hope it’s helpful to somebody out there.
Cheers 😉