Posts Tagged ‘point of view’

The Piratebay Away from Keyboard – Documentary Movie about the rise and fall of Torrent Sharing

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

The_Pirate_Bay_logo-documentary-movie-about-piratebay-creator-the-rise-and-fall-of-piratebay
A friend of mine mentioned about a documentary movie on intellectual freedoms of Sharing Copyrighted data on the Internet. Probably every young person or middle aged person in Europe have downloaded from scandalous torrent tracker ThePirateBay.com. As of time of writting most of European Union countries has prohibited the use of Piratebay.com, because the torrent tracker site "carelessly" helps people to share copyrighted data using notorious BitTorrent data sharing protocol. The topic of should or shouldn't there be a copyright laws to prohibit sharing of files between ordinary relatively poor internet users like me has been an issue of legislation for years now. From judicial point of view and from business perspective, the companies and individuals holding copyright are loosing money from free distribution of their copyrighted works. However from a point of view well being of European Union citizens it is insane and violation of basic European union legislation which is lobbying for free and equal access to education of EU citizens. There has been numerous scandals, because The Piratebay is being convinced to be just a money laundry machine under the coverage of helping people educated itself, as i saw some investigation on thepiratebay, claiming most of its finances passes through a numerous offshore accounts which makes it impossible to track and money TPB generates from the website advertisements end up in someone's pocket who did not pay EU taxations. Even if this is true, I think the immaterial side of helping people to educate themselves by sharing the world's most important Movies, Music, Software etc. makes TPB more in service than harm to society.


 

The PirateBay – Away from Keyboard (Piratebay AFK Documentary on Torrent Sharing

Enjoy

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Technology one big freedom trap – Drop off technology to live true life

Saturday, April 21st, 2012

I'm lately thinking over technology and the way, we interact a lot. I've thought over that so many times and most of the times I get into the conclusion technology is not liberating us as we're told everywhere on the contrary it makes us weak and dependable. Try to switch off your mobile and live without a mobile for instance. This is almost unthinkable for probably over 3 000 000 of people around the globe. Also this Mobile Phones and Computers and all this technology surrounding, us make us servants of technology. Technology used to be invented to serve us but what is happening is we're starting to serve it as more and more people are included in supporting technology equipment. The internet is also a big illusion as it is just something stored on electronic signals somewhere. The world is starting to get mixed too much as a result of the huge globalization the internet impose on us. The magical and non-Christian teachings has multipled many times as a result of the internet boom. Nowdays most of people are spending big part of their life in one illusionary world (the internet). This desire for multiple virtual realities make us desire something that is not real. The more we stay on the internet the more busy, we're loosing time in non-sense. Since so many people have plenty of free time, they put their time on the internet in all kind of empty things from spiritual point of view.  The worst thing from the digitalization of society is it makes us void and digital like. The structure of language is being changed by a hype words not meaning anything as they only relate to an idea to have physical dimensions. We better go back to our roots and drop technology. I'm starting to think people should start rejecting technology and live a free life like our forefathers and mothers used to have. The ancient life was harder but more real. I'm wondering if more people are sharing my ideas. Why don't we quit technology why don't we decide to live again a real life?
 

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How to permanently enable Cookies in Lynx text browser – Disable accept cookies prompt in lynx console browser

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

lynx-text-browser-logo
The default behaviour of lynx console text browser on Linuces, BSD and other free OSes is to always ask, for the accept cookies prompt once an internet web page is opened that requires browser cookies to be enabled.

I should admin, having this "secure by default" (always ask for new cookies) behaviour in lynx was a good practice from a security point of view.

Another reason, why this cookies prompt is enabled by default is back in the days, when lynx was actively developed by programmers the websites with cookies support was not that many and even cookies was mostly required for user/pass authentication (all those who still remember this days the websites that requires authentication was a way less than today) …
With this said the current continuing security cautious behaviour in the browser, left from its old days is understandable.

Screenshot Google Accept cookies Lynx dialog FreeBSD

However I personally sometimes, need to use lynx more frequently and this behaviour of always opening a new website in text mode in console to prompts me for a cookie suddenly becomes a big waste of time if you use lynx to browser more than few sites. Hence I decided to change the default way lynx handles cookies and make them enabled by default instead.
Actually even in the past, when I was mainly using internet in console on every new server or home Linux install, I was again making the cookies to be permanently accepted.
Everyone who used lynx a few times already knows its "annoying" to all time accept cookie prompts … This provoked me to write this short article to explain how enabling of constant cookie accepting in lynx is done

To enable the persistent cookies in lynx, one needs to edit lynx.cfg on different GNU / Linux and BSD* distributions lynx.cfg is located in different directory.

Most of the lynx.cfg usual locations are /etc/lynx/lynx.cfg or /etc/lynx.cfg as of time of writting this post in Debian Squeeze GNU / Linux the lynx.cfg is located in /etc/lynx-cur/lynx.cfg, whether for FreeBSD / NetBSD / OpenBSD users the file is located in /usr/local/etc/lynx.cfg

What I did to allow all cookies is open lynx.cfg in vim edit and change the following lines:

a)

#FORCE_SSL_COOKIES_SECURE:FALSE

with

FORCE_SSL_COOKIES_SECURE:TRUE

b)

#SET_COOKIES:TRUE

uncomment it to:

SET_COOKIES:TRUE

c) next, change

ACCEPT_ALL_COOKIES:FALSE

ACCEPT_ALL_COOKIES:TRUE

Onwards opening any website with lynx auto-accepts the cookies.

lynx Always allowing from domain cookies Linux screenshot

Google in Bulgarian Lynx browser screenshot

For people who care about there security (who still browse in console (surely not many anymore)), permanently allowing the cookies is not a good idea. But for those who are ready to drop off little security for convenience its ok.
 

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Did you that every single day there are …

Saturday, April 7th, 2012

Do you know that every single day there are:

  • 150 Million Blogs being read
  • 60 Million New Facebook Status Updates
  • 140 Million New "Treets" …
  • 2 Million New Videos Posted to Youtube per day
  • 3.3 Billion! Product and Information Searches
  • 188 Billion! Emails Sent …

 

This statistics were sent to me just few weeks, ago by a friend. I have no clue where he got the statistics, but the numbers are really amazing. From a business perspective point of view this numbers are tremendously HIGH! Nowadays only about 2.5 billion people are actively using the internet daily.

This means more than half of the humanity is still about to join using the internet in the 10 or 15 years to come. Though the continuous use of internet has a very bad impact on us. It is a tremendously big business opportunity field. With this said definitely business innovative people and enterpreneurs should reconsider, there strategic plans for potential products and extend or include the internet in anything they do in order to maximize profits.

All this is just news for anyone who is involved somehow actively with the net (like me), so system admins, web designers, programmers, use your brains and start making money from the internet. If one doesn't start with monetarizing his high tech skills, its quite likely some bad tied suit guy took the lead and made his millions or billions  on our back 🙂

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How to delete million of files on busy Linux servers (Work out Argument list too long)

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

How to Delete million or many thousands of files in the same directory on GNU / Linux and FreeBSD

If you try to delete more than 131072 of files on Linux with rm -f *, where the files are all stored in the same directory, you will get an error:

/bin/rm: Argument list too long.

I've earlier blogged on deleting multiple files on Linux and FreeBSD and this is not my first time facing this error.
Anyways, as time passed, I've found few other new ways to delete large multitudes of files from a server.

In this article, I will explain shortly few approaches to delete few million of obsolete files to clean some space on your server.
Here are 3 methods to use to clean your tons of junk files.

1. Using Linux find command to wipe out millions of files

a.) Finding and deleting files using find's -exec switch:

# find . -type f -exec rm -fv {} \;

This method works fine but it has 1 downside, file deletion is too slow as for each found file external rm command is invoked.

For half a million of files or more, using this method will take "long". However from a server hard disk stressing point of view it is not so bad as, the files deletion is not putting too much strain on the server hard disk.
b.) Finding and deleting big number of files with find's -delete argument:

Luckily, there is a better way to delete the files, by using find's command embedded -delete argument:

# find . -type f -print -delete

c.) Deleting and printing out deleted files with find's -print arg

If you would like to output on your terminal, what files find is deleting in "real time" add -print:

# find . -type f -print -delete

To prevent your server hard disk from being stressed and hence save your self from server normal operation "outages", it is good to combine find command with ionice, e.g.:

# ionice -c 3 find . -type f -print -delete

Just note, that ionice cannot guarantee find's opeartions will not affect severely hard disk i/o requests. On  heavily busy servers with high amounts of disk i/o writes still applying the ionice will not prevent the server from being hanged! Be sure to always keep an eye on the server, while deleting the files nomatter with or without ionice. if throughout find execution, the server gets lagged in serving its ordinary client requests or whatever, stop the execution of the cmd immediately by killing it from another ssh session or tty (if physically on the server).

2. Using a simple bash loop with rm command to delete "tons" of files

An alternative way is to use a bash loop, to print each of the files in the directory and issue /bin/rm on each of the loop elements (files) like so:

for i in *; do
rm -f $i;
done

If you'd like to print what you will be deleting add an echo to the loop:

# for i in $(echo *); do \
echo "Deleting : $i"; rm -f $i; \

The bash loop, worked like a charm in my case so I really warmly recommend this method, whenever you need to delete more than 500 000+ files in a directory.

3. Deleting multiple files with perl

Deleting multiple files with perl is not a bad idea at all.
Here is a perl one liner, to delete all files contained within a directory:

# perl -e 'for(<*>){((stat)[9]<(unlink))}'

If you prefer to use more human readable perl script to delete a multitide of files use delete_multple_files_in_dir_perl.pl

Using perl interpreter to delete thousand of files is quick, really, really quick.
I did not benchmark it on the server, how quick exactly is it, but I guess the delete rate should be similar to find command. Its possible even in some cases the perl loop is  quicker …

4. Using PHP script to delete a multiple files

Using a short php script to delete files file by file in a loop similar to above bash script is another option.
To do deletion  with PHP, use this little PHP script:

<?php
$dir = "/path/to/dir/with/files";
$dh = opendir( $dir);
$i = 0;
while (($file = readdir($dh)) !== false) {
$file = "$dir/$file";
if (is_file( $file)) {
unlink( $file);
if (!(++$i % 1000)) {
echo "$i files removed\n";
}
}
}
?>

As you see the script reads the $dir defined directory and loops through it, opening file by file and doing a delete for each of its loop elements.
You should already know PHP is slow, so this method is only useful if you have to delete many thousands of files on a shared hosting server with no (ssh) shell access.

This php script is taken from Steve Kamerman's blog . I would like also to express my big gratitude to Steve for writting such a wonderful post. His post actually become  inspiration for this article to become reality.

You can also download the php delete million of files script sample here

To use it rename delete_millioon_of_files_in_a_dir.php.txt to delete_millioon_of_files_in_a_dir.php and run it through a browser .

Note that you might need to run it multiple times, cause many shared hosting servers are configured to exit a php script which keeps running for too long.
Alternatively the script can be run through shell with PHP cli:

php -l delete_millioon_of_files_in_a_dir.php.txt.

5. So What is the "best" way to delete million of files on Linux?

In order to find out which method is quicker in terms of execution time I did a home brew benchmarking on my thinkpad notebook.

a) Creating 509072 of sample files.

Again, I used bash loop to create many thousands of files in order to benchmark.
I didn't wanted to put this load on a productive server and hence I used my own notebook to conduct the benchmarks. As my notebook is not a server the benchmarks might be partially incorrect, however I believe still .they're pretty good indicator on which deletion method would be better.

hipo@noah:~$ mkdir /tmp/test
hipo@noah:~$ cd /tmp/test;
hiponoah:/tmp/test$ for i in $(seq 1 509072); do echo aaaa >> $i.txt; done

I had to wait few minutes until I have at hand 509072  of files created. Each of the files as you can read is containing the sample "aaaa" string.

b) Calculating the number of files in the directory

Once the command was completed to make sure all the 509072 were existing, I used a find + wc cmd to calculate the directory contained number of files:

hipo@noah:/tmp/test$ find . -maxdepth 1 -type f |wc -l
509072

real 0m1.886s
user 0m0.440s
sys 0m1.332s

Its intesrsting, using an ls command to calculate the files is less efficient than using find:

hipo@noah:/tmp/test$ time ls -1 |wc -l
509072

real 0m3.355s
user 0m2.696s
sys 0m0.528s

c) benchmarking the different file deleting methods with time

– Testing delete speed of find

hipo@noah:/tmp/test$ time find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -delete
real 15m40.853s
user 0m0.908s
sys 0m22.357s

You see, using find to delete the files is not either too slow nor light quick.

– How fast is perl loop in multitude file deletion ?

hipo@noah:/tmp/test$ time perl -e 'for(<*>){((stat)[9]<(unlink))}'real 6m24.669suser 0m2.980ssys 0m22.673s

Deleting my sample 509072 took 6 mins and 24 secs. This is about 3 times faster than find! GO-GO perl 🙂
As you can see from the results, perl is a great and time saving, way to delete 500 000 files.

– The approximate speed deletion rate of of for + rm bash loop

hipo@noah:/tmp/test$ time for i in *; do rm -f $i; done

real 206m15.081s
user 2m38.954s
sys 195m38.182s

You see the execution took 195m en 38 secs = 3 HOURS and 43 MINUTES!!!! This is extremely slow ! But works like a charm as the running of deletion didn't impacted my normal laptop browsing. While the script was running I was mostly browsing through few not so heavy (non flash) websites and doing some other stuff in gnome-terminal) 🙂

As you can imagine running a bash loop is a bit CPU intensive, but puts less stress on the hard disk read/write operations. Therefore its clear using it is always a good practice when deletion of many files on a dedi servers is required.

b) my production server file deleting experience

On a production server I only tested two of all the listed methods to delete my files. The production server, where I tested is running Debian GNU / Linux Squeeze 6.0.3. There I had a task to delete few million of files.
The tested methods tried on the server were:

– The find . type -f -delete method.

– for i in *; do rm -f $i; done

The results from using find -delete method was quite sad, as the server almost hanged under the heavy hard disk load the command produced.

With the for script all went smoothly. The files were deleted for a long long time (like few hours), but while it was running, the server continued with no interruptions..

While the bash loop was running, the server load avarage kept at steady 4
Taking my experience in mind, If you're running a production, server and you're still wondering which delete method to use to wipe some multitude of files, I would recommend you go  the bash for loop + /bin/rm way. Yes, it is extremely slow, expect it run for some half an hour or so but puts not too much extra load on the server..

Using the PHP script will probably be slow and inefficient, if compared to both find and the a bash loop.. I didn't give it a try yet, but suppose it will be either equal in time or at least few times slower than bash.

If you have tried the php script and you have some observations, please drop some comment to tell me how it performs.

To sum it up;

Even though there are "hacks" to clean up some messy parsing directory full of few million of junk files, having such a directory should never exist on the first place.

Frankly, keeping millions of files within the same directory is very stupid idea.
Doing so will have a severe negative impact on a directory listing performance of your filesystem in the long term.

If you know better (more efficient) ways to delete a multitude of files in a dir please share in comments.

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