Posts Tagged ‘protection’

How to stop REDSHIFT night light brightness and color saturation eye strain protection on GNU / Linux

Tuesday, August 7th, 2018

http://jonls.dk/assets/redshift-icon-256

You know on most operating systems such as Windows 8 / 10 ,  Mac OS X as well as  GNU / Linux / BSDs (FreeBSD) etc. with graphical environments such as  GNOME / KDE etc. , there is this default functionality nowadays that is helping to reduce eye strain and improve night sleep by modifying the light and brightness as well as coloring eminated by the monitor. 

On Windows this technology is called Night Light and is easily enabled by nagivating through menus:

 

Start  > Settings  > System > Display > Night light > Night light settings.


set-your-display-windows-night-time-windows-os-10

Windows 10 Night Time settings shot

On GNU / Linux and BSD-es the eye strain application that comes preinstalled by default on most distributions is redshift – for more what is redshift check out my previous article get more peaceful night sleep on Ubuntu, Mint and Xubuntu Linux.

There is also the alternative to use F.lux (which by the way is used to prevent eye strain on Mac OS X and was the program of choice to prevent eye strain in older Windows versions)

Even though Night Light / and redshift monitor color warmth change is often mostly useful and have a positive impact improving sleep as well removes eye strain on Linux my experience with it is not too positive as it changes the monitor color gamma and makes it often quite reddish and annoying even through a normal day and not only night time.
This makes the work experience on the computer not pleasurable thus just removing it for me and I guess for many would be a must.

Assuming that you have installed Free software OS such as Linux with redshift (note that on on older releases of Deb and RPM package based distributions: you will have to manually install it with something like:)

On Debian based distros with:
 

root@debian:~# apt-get install –yes redshift redshift-gtk


On RPM Fedora / Cent OS, Redhat Enterprise Linux etc. with a command like:

 

[root@fedora]# yum install –yes redshift redshift-gtk

redshift-on-KDE-settings-menu

Redshift settings on Linux with KDE GUI

So in order to remove redshift it completely from Linux which usually on most GNU / Linux distros is running as a default process

redshift-change-monitor-brightness-to-reduce-eye-strain-gnome

 

 

 

 

 


1. * Make sure you kill all processes called redshift and redshift-gtk


to do so check processes with same name and KILL 'EM ALL!:
 

root@linux:~# ps aux|grep -i redshift
hipo     44058  2.8  0.5 620980 42340 pts/2    Sl+  20:33   0:00 /usr/bin/python3 /usr/bin/redshift-gtk
hipo     44059  0.1  0.0 295712  6476 pts/2    Sl+  20:33   0:00 /usr/bin/redshift -v

root@linux:~# kill -9 44058 44059
 


2. * Set the color temperature of the Monitor / Screen back to 6500K (this can be done either by the button menu that most screens have)


or manually with redshift itself by executing command:

 

root@linux:~# redshift -O 6500


As the screen is back to normal color gamma, its now time to completely remove redshift in order to prevent it to mess up with your monitor colors, on next PC boot or on Gnome / Mate whatever UI used session logout.

To do so issue commands:

 

 

root@linux:~# dpkg –purge redshift redshift-gtk
(Reading database … 516053 files and directories currently installed.)
Removing redshift-gtk (1.11-1) …
Purging configuration files for redshift-gtk (1.11-1) …
Removing redshift (1.11-1) …
Processing triggers for man-db (2.8.3-2) …
Processing triggers for hicolor-icon-theme (0.17-2) …
Processing triggers for mime-support (3.61) …
Processing triggers for gnome-menus (3.13.3-11) …
Processing triggers for desktop-file-utils (0.23-3) …
Processing triggers for menu (2.1.47+b1) …

3. Enjoy normal colors on your monitor  Goodbye Forever REDSHIFT, goodbuy dark crappy Screen during the day. Hello normal Screen light !!! 🙂

Protect NGINX webserver with password – Nginx basic HTTP htaccess authentication

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Protect-nginx-webserver-with-password_migrate_apache_password_protect_to_Nginx_basic_HTTP_htaccess_authentication
If you're migrating a website from Apache Webserver to Nginx to boost performance and better Utilize your servers hardware and the websites (Virtualhosts) has sections with implemented Apache .htaccess / .htaccess password authentication, you will have to migrate also Apache directory password protection to Nginx.

This is not a hard task as NginX's password protection uses same password format as Apache and Nginx password protection files are generated with standard htpasswd part of apache2-utils package (on Debian / Ubuntu servers) and httpd-tools on CentOS / Fedora / RHEL. If you're migrating the Apache websites to Nginx on a fresh new installed server and website developers are missing htpasswd tool to install it depending on Linux distro:

On Debian / Ubuntu deb based servers, install htpasswd with:

apt-get install –yes apache2-utils


On CentOS / Fedora … other RPM based servers:

 

yum -y install httpd-tools

Once installed if you need to protect new section site still being in development with password with Nginx, do it as usual with htpasswd
 

htpasswd -c /home/site/nginx-websitecom/.htpaswd admin


Note that if .htpasswd file has already exist and has other user records, to not overwritted multiple users / passes and  let all users in file login to Nginx HTTP auth with separate passwords, do:

htpasswd /var/www/nginx-websietcom/.htpasswd elijah


Now open config file of Nginx Vhost and modify it to include configuration like this:

 

server {
       listen 80;
       server_name www.nginx-website.com nginx-website.com;
       root /var/www/www.nginx-website.com/www;
[…]
       location /test {
                auth_basic "Restricted";
                auth_basic_user_file /var/www/www.example.com/.htpasswd;
       }
[…]
}


Do it for as many Vhosts as you have and to make the new settings take affect restart Nginx:

/etc/init.d/nginx restart

Enjoy 🙂

Extracting pages and page ranges, protect with password and remove password from PDF on GNU / Linux with QPDF – Linux Manipulating PDF files from command line

Friday, August 8th, 2014

qpdf-logo-extract-pages-page-ranges-protect-pdf-with-password-remove-password-from-pdf-linux-qpdf-manipulating-pdf-files-on-gnu-linux-and-bsd
If're a Linux user and you need to script certain page extraction from PDF files, crypt protect with password a PDF file or decrypt (remote password protection from PDF) or do some kind of structural transformation of existing PDF file you can use a QPDF command line utility. qpdf is in active development and very convenient tool for Website developers (PHP / Perl / Python), as often on websites its necessery to write code to cut / tailer / restructure PDFs.

1. Install QPDF from deb / rpm package

qpdf is instalalble by default in deb repositories on Debian / Ubuntu GNU / (deb derivative) Linux-es to install it apt-get it

apt-get install –yes qpdf

On RPM based distribution CentOS / SuSE / RHEL / Fedora Linux to install qpdf, fetch the respective distribution binary from rpmfind.net or to install latest version of qpdf build it from source code.

2. Install QPDF from source

To build latest qpdf from source

  • on RPM based distributions install with yum fullowing packages:

yum -y install zlib-devel pcre-devel gcc gcc-c++

  • on Deb based Linuces, you will need to install

apt-get install –yes build-essential gcc dpkg-dev g++ zlib1g-dev


Then to build gather latest qpdf source from here

 

cd /usr/local/src
wget -q http://www.pc-freak.net/files/qpdf-5.1.2.tar.gz
tar -zxvf qpdf-5.1.2.tar.gz
cd qpdf-5.1.2/
./configure
make
make install


Once it is installed, if you get error on qpdf runtime:
 

/usr/local/bin/qpdf: error while loading shared libraries: libqpdf.so.13: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

To solve the error find in your compile directory libqpdf.so.13 and copy it to /usr/lib or /usr/local/lib

 cp -rpf ./libqpdf/build/.libs/libqpdf.so.13 /usr/local/lib


3. Decrypt password encrypted (protected) PDF file

if you have time and you like reading be sure to check the extensive qpdf-manual.

To remove password from a PDF file protected with a password with qpdf

qpdf –password=SECRET-PASSWORD –decrypt input-file.pdf output-file.pdf

QPDF has a vast range of split and merge features. It can combine all the files in a folder (*.pdf), you can use it to try to recover damaged pdf files, extract individual pages from PDF, dump and reverse page range, make new created PDF with old PDF's reversed pages (pages 1,2,3,4 to become in order 4,3,2,1), apply some single pdf file metadata to multiple files.

4. Try to Recover damaged PDF file


To try to recover some damaged file with qpdf:
 

qpdf file-to-repair.pdf repaired-file.pdf

5. Extract certain pages or page range from PDF

It is recommended to use the version built from source to extract certain page range from PDF
 

/usr/local/bin/qpdf –empty –pages input-file.pdf 1-5 — outfile-file.pdf


If you wanted to take pages 1–5 from file1.pdf and pages 11–15 from file2.pdf in reverse, you would run
 

qpdf file1.pdf –pages file1.pdf 1-5 file2.pdf 15-11 — outfile.pdf

 

The history of Climate change in 83 seconds – The ridiculous climate protection negotiations and actions of world governments

Friday, June 14th, 2013

The last 15 years, we've been accustomed to listen about the Climate Change and the Global Warming problem. I remember for a first time heard about this possible problem from my Grandfather in late 1990's. Since then there is plenty of initiatives like Kyoto (Protocol) Convict for reduce of unwanted emissions. While browsing I found interesting video which is short overview of History of Climate Change. I think it is worthy to see it and get idea on the pure mess and lack of interest of governments to work well for solving the is issue…

There are plenty of youth organizations who claim to suggest how to solve global warming. But most of it is just talks. The fact is to stop it, the only way is by individual change of each of us. It is impossible for a consumer society to keep going. From time of creation of human, God created us not as consumers but as creator beings. Now most of us are dumb consumers hanging in front of Computer in Youtube and Facebook all day, watching post after post video after video, then you go to shop and you buy a lot of food. Because we're depressed of the unhuman way of living most of us eat plenty of food to somehow mitigate our awareness of unhappy reality (Americans are best in that). With overeating there is the increased number of health issues in us. We produce too much and consume too much, if we don't stop this parasite behavior soon it is more than clear, humans and our planet as ecosystem will not survive.

Disabling PHP system(); and exec(); functions to raise up Apache security on Debian GNU / Linux

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

Disabling PHP system(); and exec(); functions to raise up Apache security on Debian Gnu / Linux

At security critical hosts running Apache + PHP based sites it is recommended functions like:

system();
exec();shell_exec();.....

to be disabled. The reason is to mainly harden against script kiddies who might exploit your site/s and upload some shitty SK tool like PHP WebShell, PHP Shell and the probably thousands of “hacker” variations that exist nowdays.

In latest Debian stable Squeeze, suhosinadvanced protection module for php5 is being installed and enabled in Apache (by default).
Simply disabling a number of functions using suhosin, could prevent multiple of future headaches and hours of pondering on who 0wn3d your server ….

Disabling the basic PHP system(); and other similar functions which allows shell spawn is not always possible, since some websites or CMS platforms depends on them for proper runnig, anyways whether it is possible disabling ’em is a must.
There are two ways to disable system(); functions; One is through using /etc/php5/apache2/conf.d/suhosin.ini and 2nd by adding a list of functions that has to be disabled directly in Website Virtualhost file or in apache2.conf (/etc/apache2/apache2.conf;
For people hosting multiple virtualhost websites on the same server using the custom domain Virtualhost method is probably better, since on a global scale the functions could be enabled if some of the websites hosted on the server requires exec(); to work OK. In any case using /etc/php5/apache2/conf.d/suhosin.ini to disable system(); functions in PHP is less messy …

1. Disabling PHP system(); fuctions through /etc/apache2/apache2.conf and custom site Vhosts

Place somewhere (I prefer near the end of config);;;


php_admin_flag safe_mode on
php_admin_value disable_functions "system, exec, shell_exec, passthru , ini_alter, dl, pfsockopen, openlog, syslog, readlink, symlink, link, leak, fsockopen, popen, escapeshellcmd, apache_child_terminate apache_get_modules, apache_get_version, apache_getenv, apache_note,apache_setenv,virtual"

Disabling it for custom virtualhost is done by simply adding above Apache directvies (before the closing tag in /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/custom-vhost.com

2. Disabling PHP system();, exec(); shell spawn with suhosin.ini

In /etc/php5/apache2/conf.d/suhosin.ini add;;

suhosin.executor.func.blacklist =system, exec, shell_exec, passthru, ini_alter, dl,
pfsockopen, openlog, syslog, readlink, symlink, link, leak, fsockopen, popen,
escapeshellcmd, apache_child_terminate apache_get_modules, apache_get_version,
apache_getenv, apache_note,apache_setenv,virtual

To do it directly via shell issue;;;

server: conf.d/# cd /etc/php5/apache2/conf.d/
server: conf.d# echo 'suhosin.executor.func.blacklist =system, exec, shell_exec, passthru, ini_alter, dl,' >> suhosin.ini
server: conf.d# echo 'pfsockopen, openlog, syslog, readlink, symlink, link, leak, fsockopen, popen,' >> suhosin.ini
server: conf.d# echo escapeshellcmd, apache_child_terminate apache_get_modules, apache_get_version,' >> suhosin.ini
server: conf.d# echo 'apache_getenv, apache_note,apache_setenv,virtual' >> suhosin.ini

Then to re-load the memory loaded Apache libphp library an Apache restart is necessary;

server: conf.d# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
Restarting web server: apache2 ... waiting .
server: conf.d#

Tadam, this should be quite a good security against annoying automated script attacks. Cheers 😉

How to get rid of “PHP Warning: PHP Startup: Unable to load dynamic library ‘/usr/lib/php5/20090626/suhosin.so'” on Debian GNU / Linux

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011

PHP-warning-how-to-fix-warnings-and-errors-php-logo

After a recent new Debian Squeeze Apache+PHP server install and moving a website from another server host running on CentOS 5.7 Linux server, some of the PHP scripts running via crontab started displaying the following annoying PHP Warnings :

debian:~# php /home/website/www/cron/update.php

PHP Warning: PHP Startup: Unable to load dynamic library '/usr/lib/php5/20090626/suhosin.so' – /usr/lib/php5/20090626/suhosin.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory in Unknown on line 0

Obviously the error revealed that PHP cli is not happy that, I've previously removes the suhosin php5-suhosin module from the system.
I wouldn't have removed php5-suhosin if sometimes it doesn't produced some odd experiences with the Apache webserver.
To fix the PHP Warning, I used first grep to see, where exactly the suhosin module gets included in debian's php.ini config files. debian:~# cd /etc/php5
debian:/etc/php5# grep -rli suhosin *
apache2/conf.d/suhosin.ini
cgi/conf.d/suhosin.ini
cli/conf.d/suhosin.ini
conf.d/suhosin.ini

Yeah that's right Debian has three php.ini php config files. One for the php cli/usr/bin/php, another for the Apache webserver loaded php library/usr/lib/apache2/modules/libphp5.so and one for Apache's cgi module/usr/lib/apache2/modules/mod_fcgid.so .

I was too lazy to edit all the above found declarations trying to include the suhosin module in PHP, hence I remembered that probably all this obsolete suhosin module declaration are still present because probably the php5-suhosin package is still not purged from the system.

A quick check with dpkg , further strenthened my assumption as the php5-suhosin module was still hanging around as an (rc – remove candidate);

debian:~# dpkg -l |grep -i suhosin
rc php5-suhosin 0.9.32.1-1 advanced protection module for php5

Hence to remove the obsolete package config and directories completely out of the system and hence solve the PHP Warning I used dpkg –purge, like so:

debian:~# dpkg --purge php5-suhosin
(Reading database ... 76048 files and directories currently installed.)
Removing php5-suhosin ...
Purging configuration files for php5-suhosin ...
Processing triggers for libapache2-mod-php5 ...
Reloading web server config: apache2.

Further on to make sure the PHP Warning is solved I did the cron php script another go and it produced no longer errors:

debian:~# php /home/website/www/cron/update.php
debian:~#

Secure Apache webserver against basic Denial of Service attacks with mod_evasive on Debian Linux

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

Secure Apache against basic Denial of Service attacks with mod evasive, how webserver DDoS works

One good module that helps in mitigating, very basic Denial of Service attacks against Apache 1.3.x 2.0.x and 2.2.x webserver is mod_evasive

I’ve noticed however many Apache administrators out there does forget to install it on new Apache installations or even some of them haven’t heard about of it.
Therefore I wrote this small article to create some more awareness of the existence of the anti DoS module and hopefully thorugh it help some of my readers to strengthen their server security.

Here is a description on what exactly mod-evasive module does:

debian:~# apt-cache show libapache2-mod-evasive | grep -i description -A 7

Description: evasive module to minimize HTTP DoS or brute force attacks
mod_evasive is an evasive maneuvers module for Apache to provide some
protection in the event of an HTTP DoS or DDoS attack or brute force attack.
.
It is also designed to be a detection tool, and can be easily configured to
talk to ipchains, firewalls, routers, and etcetera.
.
This module only works on Apache 2.x servers

How does mod-evasive anti DoS module works?

Detection is performed by creating an internal dynamic hash table of IP Addresses and URIs, and denying any single IP address which matches the criterias:

  • Requesting the same page more than number of times per second
  • Making more than N (number) of concurrent requests on the same child per second
  • Making requests to Apache during the IP is temporarily blacklisted (in a blocking list – IP blacklist is removed after a time period))

These anti DDoS and DoS attack protection decreases the possibility that Apache gets DoSed by ana amateur DoS attack, however it still opens doors for attacks who has a large bot-nets of zoombie hosts (let’s say 10000) which will simultaneously request a page from the Apache server. The result in a scenario with a infected botnet running a DoS tool in most of the cases will be a quick exhaustion of system resources available (bandwidth, server memory and processor consumption).
Thus mod-evasive just grants a DoS and DDoS security only on a basic, level where someone tries to DoS a webserver with only possessing access to few hosts.
mod-evasive however in many cases mesaure to protect against DoS and does a great job if combined with Apache mod-security module discussed in one of my previous blog posts – Tightening PHP Security on Debian with Apache 2.2 with ModSecurity2
1. Install mod-evasive

Installing mod-evasive on Debian Lenny, Squeeze and even Wheezy is done in identical way straight using apt-get:

deiban:~# apt-get install libapache2-mod-evasive
...

2. Enable mod-evasive in Apache

debian:~# ln -sf /etc/apache2/mods-available/mod-evasive.load /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/mod-evasive.load

3. Configure the way mod-evasive deals with potential DoS attacks

Open /etc/apache2/apache2.conf, go down to the end of the file and paste inside, below three mod-evasive configuration directives:

<IfModule mod_evasive20.c>
DOSHashTableSize 3097DOS
PageCount 30
DOSSiteCount 40
DOSPageInterval 2
DOSSiteInterval 1
DOSBlockingPeriod 120
#DOSEmailNotify hipo@mymailserver.com
</IfModule>

In case of the above configuration criterias are matched, mod-evasive instructs Apache to return a 403 (Forbidden by default) error page which will conserve bandwidth and system resources in case of DoS attack attempt, especially if the DoS attack targets multiple requests to let’s say a large downloadable file or a PHP,Perl,Python script which does a lot of computation and thus consumes large portion of server CPU time.

The meaning of the above three mod-evasive config vars are as follows:

DOSHashTableSize 3097 – Increasing the DoSHashTableSize will increase performance of mod-evasive but will consume more server memory, on a busy webserver this value however should be increased
DOSPageCount 30 – Add IP in evasive temporary blacklist if a request for any IP that hits the same page 30 consequential times.
DOSSiteCount 40 – Add IP to be be blacklisted if 40 requests are made to a one and the same URL location in 1 second time
DOSBlockingPeriod 120 – Instructs the time in seconds for which an IP will get blacklisted (e.g. will get returned the 403 foribden page), this settings instructs mod-evasive to block every intruder which matches DOSPageCount 30 or DOSSiteCount 40 for 2 minutes time.
DOSPageInterval 2 – Interval of 2 seconds for which DOSPageCount can be reached.
DOSSiteInterval 1 – Interval of 1 second in which if DOSSiteCount of 40 is matched the matched IP will be blacklisted for configured period of time.

mod-evasive also supports IP whitelisting with its option DOSWhitelist , handy in cases if for example, you should allow access to a single webpage from office env consisting of hundred computers behind a NAT.
Another handy configuration option is the module capability to notify, if a DoS is originating from a number of IP addresses using the option DOSEmailNotify
Using the DOSSystemCommand in relation with iptables, could be configured to filter out any IP addresses which are found to be matching the configured mod-evasive rules.
The module also supports custom logging, if you want to keep track on IPs which are found to be trying a DoS attack against the server place in above shown configuration DOSLogDir “/var/log/apache2/evasive” and create the /var/log/apache2/evasive directory, with:
debian:~# mkdir /var/log/apache2/evasive

I decided not to log mod-evasive DoS IP matches as this will just add some extra load on the server, however in debugging some mistakenly blacklisted IPs logging is sure a must.

4. Restart Apache to load up mod-evasive debian:~# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
...

Finally a very good reading which sheds more light on how exactly mod-evasive works and some extra module configuration options are located in the documentation bundled with the deb package to read it, issue:

debian:~# zless /usr/share/doc/libapache2-mod-evasive/README.gz

Filter messages in Qmail with unwanted words, get rid of the Viagra annoying spam with Qtrap

Sunday, September 4th, 2011

Drop qmail received mail containing banned / unwanted words to get rid of Viagra and Sex related spam

Recently the annoying Viagra spam has emerged again. Therefore I decided to clean up some of the mails received to one of the qmail servers to protect users emailbox from this viagra peril.

To do so I’ve remember about an old script which used to be part of qmailrocks.org qmail install, the script is called qtrap and is able to filter emails based on list of specific mail contained words.
Since qmailrocks.org is gone (down) for some time and its still available only on few mirrored locations which by the way are not too easy to find I decided to write a little post on how qtrap.sh could be integrated quick & easy with any Qmail + Vpopmail install out there.

Hereby I include the description for qtrap.sh given by the script author:

“qtrap.sh script is applied on a per domain basis and serves as a “bad word” scanner to catch any spam that Spamassassin may have missed. This filter serves as the last defense against SPAM before it arrived in your inbox. I like this filter because it helps to get rid of any SPAM that happens to make it by Spamassassin. Without any protection at all, my mailbox gets a shit ton of SPAM every day. Within the first 3 months I enacted the Qtrap filter, Qtrap logged over 9,000 deleted SPAM messages, none of which were legitimate e-mails. My keyboard’s delete key was very appreciated the extra rest.

Any emails that are scanned and contain a banned word will be automatically deleted and logged by the qtrap script. A whitelist feature now exists so that individual addresses or domains can be exempt from the qtrap scan.”

Now as one might have general idea on what the script does. Here is the step by step qtrap.sh integration;

1. Create necessery qtrap directory and logs and set proper permissions

If the vpopmail is installed in /home/vpopmail , issue the following commands.

debian:~# cd /home/vpopmail
debian:~# mkdir -p qtrap/logs
debian:/home/vpopmail/qtrap# cd qtrap
debian:/home/vpopmail/qtrap# wget http://www.pc-freak.net/files/qtrap.sh
...
debian:/home/vpopmail/qtrap# cd ~
debian:~# touch /home/vpopmail/qtrap/logs/qtrap.logdebian:~# chown -R vpopmail:vchkpw /home/vpopmail/qtrapdebian:~# chmod -R 755 /home/vpopmail/qtrap

On older qmail installations it could be vpopmail is installed in /var/vpopmail if that’s the case, link /var/vpopmail to /home/vpopmail and go back to step 1. To link:

debian:~# ln -sf /var/vpopmail/ /home/vpopmail

2. Edit qtrap.sh to whitelist email addresses and build a ban words list

a) Include the email addresses mail arriving from which would not be checked by qtrap.sh

Inside qtrap.sh in line 63, there is a shell function whitelist_check(), the function looks like so:

whitelist_check () {
case $WHITELIST in
address@somewhere.com|address@somewhereelse.com)
echo $SENDER found in whitelist on `date "+%D %H:%M:%S"` >> /home/vpopmail/qtrap/logs/qtrap.log
exit 0;;
*)
;;
esac
}

By default the script has just two sample mails which gets whitelisted this is the line reading:

address@somewhere.com|address@somewhereelse.com

The whitelisted emails should be separated with a pipe, thus to add two more sample emails to get whitelisted by script the line should be changed like:

address@somewhere.com|address@somewhereelse.com|hipod@mymailserver.com|hipo@gmail.com

In order to whitelist an entire domain let’s say yahoo.com add a line to the above code like:

address@somewhere.com|address@somewhereelse.com|hipod@mymailserver.com|hipo@gmail.com|*yahoo.com

b) Defining the bad words ban list, mails containing them should not be delivery by qmail

The function that does check for the ban word list inside the script is checkall();, below is a paste from the script function:

checkall () {
case $BANNED_WORDS in
porn|PORN|Sex|SEX)
printout $BANNED_WORDS
echo MESSAGE DROPPED from $SENDER because of $BANNED_WORDS on `date "+%D %H:%M:%S"` >> /home/vpopmail/qtrap/logs/qtrap.log
exit 99;;
*)
;;
esac
}

checkall(); is located on line 74 in qtrap.sh, the exact list of banned words which the script should look for is located on line 76, the default qtrap.sh filters only mails containing just 4 words, e.g.:

porn|PORN|Sex|SEX)

To add the Viagra and VIAGRA common spam words to the list, modify it and expand like so:

porn|PORN|Sex|SEX|viagra|Viagra)

The delimiter is again | , so proceed further and add any unwanted spam words that are not common for any legit mails.

3. Install qtrap.sh to process all emails delivered to vpopmail

If its necessery to install the dropping of mails based on word filtering only to a single vpopmail virtualdomain do it with cmd:

debian:~# cd /home/vpopmail/domains/yourdomain.com
debian:/home/vpopmail/domains/yourdomain.com# touch .qmail-default.new
debian:/home/vpopmail/domains/yourdomain.com# echo '| /home/vpopmail/qtrap/qtrap.sh' >> .qmail-default.new
debian:/home/vpopmail/domains/yourdomain.com# echo "| /home/vpopmail/bin/vdelivermail '' bounce-no-mailbox" >> .qmail-default.new
debian:/home/vpopmail/domains/yourdomain.com# chown vpopmail:vchkpw .qmail-default.new
debian:/home/vpopmail/domains/yourdomain.com# cp -rpf .qmail-default .qmail-default.bak; mv .qmail-default.new .qmail-default
If however qtrap.sh needs to get installed for all existing vpopmail virtualdomains on the qmail server, issue a one liner bash script:

debian:~# cd /home/vpopmail/domains
debian:/var/vpopmail/domains# for i in *; do cd $i; echo "| /home/vpopmail/qtrap/qtrap.sh" >> $i/.qmail-default.new;
echo "| /home/vpopmail/bin/vdelivermail '' bounce-no-mailbox" >> $i/.qmail-default.new;
chown vpopmail:vchkpw .qmail-default.new; mv .qmail-default .qmail-default.old; mv .qmail-default.new .qmail-default; cd ..; done

This for loop will add ‘| /home/vpopmail/qtrap/qtrap.sh’ to all .qmail-default for all vpopmail domains.

Afterwards the .qmail-default file should contain the following two lines:

| /home/vpopmail/qtrap/qtrap.sh
| /home/vpopmail/bin/vdelivermail '' delete

A very important thing here you should consider that adding some common words, as let’s say hello or mail etc. could easily drop almost all the emails the qmail hands in to vpopmail.

Caution!! Never ever implement common words in the list of words !!
Always make sure the banned words added to qtrap.sh are words that are never enter an everyday legit email.

Another thing to keep in mind is that qtrap.sh doesn’t make a copy of the received message ,though it can easily be modified to complete this task.
Any mail that matches the banned words list will be dropped and lost forever.

4. Check if qtrap.sh is working

To check, if qtrap is working send mail to some mailbox located on the qmail server containing inside subject or mail message body the unwanted word defined inside qtrap.sh.

The mail should not be received in the mailbox to which its sent, if qtrap is working moreover qtrap.sh should log it inside it’s log file:

debian:~# cat /home/vpopmail/qtrap/logs/qtrap.log
MESSAGE DROPPED from hipo@mytestmail.com because of viagra on 09/03/11 11:34:19
MESSAGE DROPPED from support@mymailserver.com because of Viagra on 09/03/11 11:39:29

If the qtrap.log contains records similar to the one above, and the mail matching the banned word is not delivered, qtrap.sh is properly configured. If any issues check in qmail logs, they should have a good pointer on what went wrong with qtrap.sh invokation.

Note that I’ve integrated qtrap.sh to custom qmail install running on Debian Lenny 5.0 GNU/Linux.
If I have time I’ll soon test if its working fine on the latest stable Debian Squeeze and will report here in comments.
If however someone is willing to test if the script works on Debian Squeeze 6.0 or have tested it already please drop a comment to report if it works fine.
qtrap.sh, is a bit oldish and is not written to work too optimal therefore on some heavy loaded mail servers it can create some extra load and a bit delay the mail delivery. Thus when implementang one needs to consider the downsides of putting it in.

Also I was thinking tt might be nice if the script is rewritten to read the ban words and whitelist mails from files instead of as it is now as the words are hard coded in the script.
If I have some free time, I’ll probably do this, though I’m not sure if this is a too good idea as this might have a negative performance impact on the script execution time, as each instance of the script invoked should do one more operation of reading a file storing the ban words.

Well that’s pretty much it, enjoy 😉

How to harden Linux Security and imprpove network efficiency on Kernel sysctl Level to Stop SYN flood

Friday, July 8th, 2011

Power up Linux and protect against DDoS with sysctl var optimization

Some long time ago I’ve written an article Optimizing Linux tcp/ip networking

In the article I’ve examined a number of Linux kernel sysctl variables, which significantly improve the way TCP/IP networking is handled by a non router Linux based servers.

As the time progresses I’ve been continuing to read materials on blogs and internet sites on various tips and anti Denial of Service rules which one could apply on newly installed hosting (Apache/MySql/Qmail/Proxy) server to improve webserver responce times and tighten the overall security level.

In my quest for sysctl 😉 I found a few more handy sysctl variables apart from the old ones I incorporate on every Linux server I adminstrate.
The sysctl variables improves the overall network handling efficiency and protects about common SYN/ACK Denial of service attacks.

Here are the extra sysctl variables I started incorporating just recently:

############ IPv4 Sysctl Settings ################
#Enable ExecShield protection (randomize virtual assigned space to protect against many exploits)
kernel.randomize_va_space = 1
#Increase the number of PIDs processes could assign this is very needed especially on more powerful servers
kernel.pid_max = 65536
# Prevent against the common 'syn flood attack'
net.ipv4.tcp_syncookies = 1
# Controls the use of TCP syncookies two is generally a better idea, though you might experiment
#net.ipv4.tcp_syncookies = 1
net.ipv4.tcp_synack_retries = 2
##################################################
#
############## IPv6 Sysctl Settings ################
# Number of Router Solicitations to send until assuming no routers are present.
net.ipv6.conf.default.router_solicitations = 0
# Accept Router Preference in RA? Again not necessery if the server is not a router
net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_ra_rtr_pref = 0
# Learn Prefix Information in Router Advertisement (Unnecessery) for non-routers
net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_ra_pinfo = 0
# disable accept of hop limit settings from other routers (could be used for DoS)
net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_ra_defrtr = 0
# disable ipv6 global unicasts server assignments
net.ipv6.conf.default.autoconf = 0
# neighbor solicitations to send out per address (better if disabled)
net.ipv6.conf.default.dad_transmits = 0
# disable assigning more than 1 address per network interface
net.ipv6.conf.default.max_addresses = 1
#####################################################

 

To use this settings paste the above sysctl variables in /etc/sysctl.conf and ask sysctl command to read and apply the newly added conf settings:

server:~# sysctl -p
...

Hopefully you should not get errors while applying the sysctl settings, if you get some errors, it’s possible some of the variable is differently named (depending on the Linux kernel version) or the Linux distribution on which sysctl’s are implemented.

For some convenience I’ve created unified sysctl variables /etc/sysct.conf containing the newly variables I started implementing to servers with the ones I already exlpained in my previous post Optimizing Linux TCP/IP Networking

Here is the optimized / hardened sysctl.conf file for download

I use this exact sysctl.conf these days on both Linux hosting / VPS / Mail servers etc. as well as on my personal notebook 😉

Here is also the the complete content of above’s sysctl.conf file, just in case if somebody wants to directly copy/paste it in his /etc/sysctl.conf

# Sysctl kernel variables to improve network performance and protect against common Denial of Service attacks
# It's possible that not all of the variables are working on all Linux distributions, test to make sure
# Some of the variables might need a slight modification to match server hardware, however in most cases it should be fine
# variables list compiled by hip0
### http://www.pc-freak.net
#### date 08.07.2011
############ IPv4 Sysctl Kernel Settings ################
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 0
# ( Turn off IP Forwarding )
net.ipv4.conf.default.rp_filter = 1
# ( Control Source route verification )
net.ipv4.conf.default.accept_redirects = 0
# ( Disable ICMP redirects )
net.ipv4.conf.all.accept_redirects = 0
# ( same as above )
net.ipv4.conf.default.accept_source_route = 0
# ( Disable IP source routing )
net.ipv4.conf.all.accept_source_route = 0
# ( - || - )net.ipv4.tcp_fin_timeout = 40
# ( Decrease FIN timeout ) - Useful on busy/high load server
net.ipv4.tcp_keepalive_time = 4000
# ( keepalive tcp timeout )
net.core.rmem_default = 786426
# Receive memory stack size ( a good idea to increase it if your server receives big files )
##net.ipv4.tcp_rmem = "4096 87380 4194304"
net.core.wmem_default = 8388608
#( Reserved Memory per connection )
net.core.wmem_max = 8388608
net.core.optmem_max = 40960
# ( maximum amount of option memory buffers )
# tcp reordering, increase max buckets, increase the amount of backlost
net.ipv4.tcp_max_tw_buckets = 360000
net.ipv4.tcp_reordering = 5
##net.core.hot_list_length = 256
net.core.netdev_max_backlog = 1024
#Enable ExecShield protection (randomize virtual assigned space to protect against many exploits)
kernel.randomize_va_space = 1
#Increase the number of PIDs processes could assign this is very needed especially on more powerful servers
kernel.pid_max = 65536
# Prevent against the common 'syn flood attack'net.ipv4.tcp_syncookies = 1
# Controls the use of TCP syncookies two is generally a better idea, though you might experiment
#net.ipv4.tcp_syncookies = 1
net.ipv4.tcp_synack_retries = 2
###################################################
############## IPv6 Sysctl Settings ################
# Number of Router Solicitations to send until assuming no routers are present.
net.ipv6.conf.default.router_solicitations = 0
# Accept Router Preference in RA? Again not necessery if the server is not a router
net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_ra_rtr_pref = 0
# Learn Prefix Information in Router Advertisement (Unnecessery) for non-routersnet.
ipv6.conf.default.accept_ra_pinfo = 0
# disable accept of hop limit settings from other routers (could be used for DoS)
net.ipv6.conf.default.accept_ra_defrtr = 0
# disable ipv6 global unicasts server assignmentsnet.
ipv6.conf.default.autoconf = 0
# neighbor solicitations to send out per address (better if disabled)
net.ipv6.conf.default.dad_transmits = 0
# disable assigning more than 1 address per network interfacenet.
ipv6.conf.default.max_addresses = 1
#####################################################
# Reboot if kernel panic
kernel.panic = 20

These sysctl settings will tweaken the Linux kernel default network settings performance and you will notice the improvements in website responsiveness immediately in some cases implementing this kernel level goodies will make the server perform better and the system load might decrease even 😉

This optimizations on a kernel level are not only handy for servers, their implementation on Linux Desktop should also have a positive influence on the way the network behaves and could improve significantly the responce times of opening pages in Firefox/Opera/Epiphany Torrent downloads etc.

Hope this kernel tweakenings are helpful to someone.
Cheers 😉

Maximal protection against SSH attacks. If your server has to stay with open SSH (Secure Shell) port open to the world

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

Brute Force Attack SSH screen, Script kiddie attacking
If you’re a a remote Linux many other Unix based OSes, you have defitenily faced the security threat of many failed ssh logins or as it’s better known a brute force attack

During such attacks your /var/log/messages or /var/log/auth gets filled in with various failed password logs like for example:

Feb 3 20:25:50 linux sshd[32098]: Failed password for invalid user oracle from 95.154.249.193 port 51490 ssh2
Feb 3 20:28:30 linux sshd[32135]: Failed password for invalid user oracle1 from 95.154.249.193 port 42778 ssh2
Feb 3 20:28:55 linux sshd[32141]: Failed password for invalid user test1 from 95.154.249.193 port 51072 ssh2
Feb 3 20:30:15 linux sshd[32163]: Failed password for invalid user test from 95.154.249.193 port 47481 ssh2
Feb 3 20:33:20 linux sshd[32211]: Failed password for invalid user testuser from 95.154.249.193 port 51731 ssh2
Feb 3 20:35:32 linux sshd[32249]: Failed password for invalid user user from 95.154.249.193 port 38966 ssh2
Feb 3 20:35:59 linux sshd[32256]: Failed password for invalid user user1 from 95.154.249.193 port 55850 ssh2
Feb 3 20:36:25 linux sshd[32268]: Failed password for invalid user user3 from 95.154.249.193 port 36610 ssh2
Feb 3 20:36:52 linux sshd[32274]: Failed password for invalid user user4 from 95.154.249.193 port 45514 ssh2
Feb 3 20:37:19 linux sshd[32279]: Failed password for invalid user user5 from 95.154.249.193 port 54262 ssh2
Feb 3 20:37:45 linux sshd[32285]: Failed password for invalid user user2 from 95.154.249.193 port 34755 ssh2
Feb 3 20:38:11 linux sshd[32292]: Failed password for invalid user info from 95.154.249.193 port 43146 ssh2
Feb 3 20:40:50 linux sshd[32340]: Failed password for invalid user peter from 95.154.249.193 port 46411 ssh2
Feb 3 20:43:02 linux sshd[32372]: Failed password for invalid user amanda from 95.154.249.193 port 59414 ssh2
Feb 3 20:43:28 linux sshd[32378]: Failed password for invalid user postgres from 95.154.249.193 port 39228 ssh2
Feb 3 20:43:55 linux sshd[32384]: Failed password for invalid user ftpuser from 95.154.249.193 port 47118 ssh2
Feb 3 20:44:22 linux sshd[32391]: Failed password for invalid user fax from 95.154.249.193 port 54939 ssh2
Feb 3 20:44:48 linux sshd[32397]: Failed password for invalid user cyrus from 95.154.249.193 port 34567 ssh2
Feb 3 20:45:14 linux sshd[32405]: Failed password for invalid user toto from 95.154.249.193 port 42350 ssh2
Feb 3 20:45:42 linux sshd[32410]: Failed password for invalid user sophie from 95.154.249.193 port 50063 ssh2
Feb 3 20:46:08 linux sshd[32415]: Failed password for invalid user yves from 95.154.249.193 port 59818 ssh2
Feb 3 20:46:34 linux sshd[32424]: Failed password for invalid user trac from 95.154.249.193 port 39509 ssh2
Feb 3 20:47:00 linux sshd[32432]: Failed password for invalid user webmaster from 95.154.249.193 port 47424 ssh2
Feb 3 20:47:27 linux sshd[32437]: Failed password for invalid user postfix from 95.154.249.193 port 55615 ssh2
Feb 3 20:47:54 linux sshd[32442]: Failed password for www-data from 95.154.249.193 port 35554 ssh2
Feb 3 20:48:19 linux sshd[32448]: Failed password for invalid user temp from 95.154.249.193 port 43896 ssh2
Feb 3 20:48:46 linux sshd[32453]: Failed password for invalid user service from 95.154.249.193 port 52092 ssh2
Feb 3 20:49:13 linux sshd[32458]: Failed password for invalid user tomcat from 95.154.249.193 port 60261 ssh2
Feb 3 20:49:40 linux sshd[32464]: Failed password for invalid user upload from 95.154.249.193 port 40236 ssh2
Feb 3 20:50:06 linux sshd[32469]: Failed password for invalid user debian from 95.154.249.193 port 48295 ssh2
Feb 3 20:50:32 linux sshd[32479]: Failed password for invalid user apache from 95.154.249.193 port 56437 ssh2
Feb 3 20:51:00 linux sshd[32492]: Failed password for invalid user rds from 95.154.249.193 port 45540 ssh2
Feb 3 20:51:26 linux sshd[32501]: Failed password for invalid user exploit from 95.154.249.193 port 53751 ssh2
Feb 3 20:51:51 linux sshd[32506]: Failed password for invalid user exploit from 95.154.249.193 port 33543 ssh2
Feb 3 20:52:18 linux sshd[32512]: Failed password for invalid user postgres from 95.154.249.193 port 41350 ssh2
Feb 3 21:02:04 linux sshd[32652]: Failed password for invalid user shell from 95.154.249.193 port 54454 ssh2
Feb 3 21:02:30 linux sshd[32657]: Failed password for invalid user radio from 95.154.249.193 port 35462 ssh2
Feb 3 21:02:57 linux sshd[32663]: Failed password for invalid user anonymous from 95.154.249.193 port 44290 ssh2
Feb 3 21:03:23 linux sshd[32668]: Failed password for invalid user mark from 95.154.249.193 port 53285 ssh2
Feb 3 21:03:50 linux sshd[32673]: Failed password for invalid user majordomo from 95.154.249.193 port 34082 ssh2
Feb 3 21:04:43 linux sshd[32684]: Failed password for irc from 95.154.249.193 port 50918 ssh2
Feb 3 21:05:36 linux sshd[32695]: Failed password for root from 95.154.249.193 port 38577 ssh2
Feb 3 21:06:30 linux sshd[32705]: Failed password for bin from 95.154.249.193 port 53564 ssh2
Feb 3 21:06:56 linux sshd[32714]: Failed password for invalid user dev from 95.154.249.193 port 34568 ssh2
Feb 3 21:07:23 linux sshd[32720]: Failed password for root from 95.154.249.193 port 43799 ssh2
Feb 3 21:09:10 linux sshd[32755]: Failed password for invalid user bob from 95.154.249.193 port 50026 ssh2
Feb 3 21:09:36 linux sshd[32761]: Failed password for invalid user r00t from 95.154.249.193 port 58129 ssh2
Feb 3 21:11:50 linux sshd[537]: Failed password for root from 95.154.249.193 port 58358 ssh2

This brute force dictionary attacks often succeed where there is a user with a weak a password, or some old forgotten test user account.
Just recently on one of the servers I administrate I have catched a malicious attacker originating from Romania, who was able to break with my system test account with the weak password tset .

Thanksfully the script kiddie was unable to get root access to my system, so what he did is he just started another ssh brute force scanner to crawl the net and look for some other vulnerable hosts.

As you read in my recent example being immune against SSH brute force attacks is a very essential security step, the administrator needs to take on a newly installed server.

The easiest way to get read of the brute force attacks without using some external brute force filtering software like fail2ban can be done by:

1. By using an iptables filtering rule to filter every IP which has failed in logging in more than 5 times

To use this brute force prevention method you need to use the following iptables rules:
linux-host:~# /sbin/iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -i eth0 -m state -state NEW -m recent -set
linux-host:~# /sbin/iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -i eth0 -m state -state NEW
-m recent -update -seconds 60 -hitcount 5 -j DROP

This iptables rules will filter out the SSH port to an every IP address with more than 5 invalid attempts to login to port 22

2. Getting rid of brute force attacks through use of hosts.deny blacklists

sshbl – The SSH blacklist, updated every few minutes, contains IP addresses of hosts which tried to bruteforce into any of currently 19 hosts (all running OpenBSD, FreeBSD or some Linux) using the SSH protocol. The hosts are located in Germany, the United States, United Kingdom, France, England, Ukraine, China, Australia, Czech Republic and setup to report and log those attempts to a central database. Very similar to all the spam blacklists out there.

To use sshbl you will have to set up in your root crontab the following line:

*/60 * * * * /usr/bin/wget -qO /etc/hosts.deny http://www.sshbl.org/lists/hosts.deny

To set it up from console issue:

linux-host:~# echo '*/60 * * * * /usr/bin/wget -qO /etc/hosts.deny http://www.sshbl.org/lists/hosts.deny' | crontab -u root -

These crontab will download and substitute your system default hosts with the one regularly updated on sshbl.org , thus next time a brute force attacker which has been a reported attacker will be filtered out as your Linux or Unix system finds out the IP matches an ip in /etc/hosts.deny

The /etc/hosts.deny filtering rules are written in a way that only publicly known brute forcer IPs will only be filtered for the SSH service, therefore other system services like Apache or a radio, tv streaming server will be still accessible for the brute forcer IP.

It’s a good practice actually to use both of the methods 😉
Thanks to Static (Multics) a close friend of mine for inspiring this article.