Posts Tagged ‘samba shares’

Testing your local network for open Windows shares from Linux router

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Windows sharing testing local network for open  shared directories Samba Software logo

Whether you administrate local Windows network behind a DMZ router, It is useful to routinely scan from Linux router which Windows hosts on the network has enabled sharing? The reason is some Windows user might share something by mistake which is not supposed to be shared without even he realizes this.
 

 In case, where new Linux router is configured and Windows hosts behind it can't locate each other on network make sure you have in your firewall before any filtering (REJECT / DROP) firewall rules:

iptables -A INPUT -s 192.168.5.1/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 137 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT  -s 192.168.5.1/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 138 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT  -s 192.168.5.1/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 139 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT  -s 192.168.5.1/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 445 -j ACCEPT

iptables -A INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 445 -j REJECT
iptables -A INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 138 -j REJECT
iptables -A INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 139 -j REJECT
iptables -A INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 137 -j REJECT

(Qquickest way to place rules to exec on next boot is via /etc/rc.local)

Once set, to check all is fine with fwall rules:

router:~# iptables -L INPUT -n

Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)

target     prot opt source               destination         

ACCEPT     tcp  —  192.168.5.0/24       0.0.0.0/0           state NEW tcp dpt:137
ACCEPT     tcp  —  192.168.5.0/24       0.0.0.0/0           state NEW tcp dpt:138
ACCEPT     tcp  —  192.168.5.0/24       0.0.0.0/0           state NEW tcp dpt:139
ACCEPT     tcp  —  192.168.5.0/24       0.0.0.0/0           state NEW tcp dpt:445 
REJECT tcp — 0.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0/0 state NEW tcp dpt:445 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable
REJECT tcp — 0.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0/0 state NEW tcp dpt:138 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable
REJECT tcp — 0.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0/0 state NEW tcp dpt:139 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable
REJECT tcp — 0.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0/0 state NEW tcp dpt:137 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable

On CentOS / Fedora / Redhat router place below rules in /etc/sysconfig/iptablesdefault firewall configuration file for RPM based distros:

-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 137 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 138 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 139 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 445 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 137 -j REJECT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 138 -j REJECT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 139 -j REJECT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/24 -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 445 -j REJECT

After that check lets say 192.168.5.0/24 whether Windows Samba shares ports are reachable:

 To check hosts with Sharing easiest way is to scan your network C class range with nmap for all ports through which Windows Samba shares communicate – i.e. check for open state TCP / UDP port numbers 139,137,139,445 list of samba used default ports is in  /etc/services

router:~# grep netbios /etc/services

netbios-ns 137/tcp # NETBIOS Name Service
netbios-ns 137/udp
netbios-dgm 138/tcp # NETBIOS Datagram Service
netbios-dgm 138/udp
netbios-ssn 139/tcp # NETBIOS session service
netbios-ssn 139/udp

Note that Port 445 microsoft-ds is not in /etc/services because it is not common used (only used whether Windows hosts are using Active Directory)

 
router:~# nmap 192.168.5.1-255 -p 139,137,139,445

Interesting ports on 192.168.5.23:

PORT    STATE    SERVICE
137/tcp filtered netbios-ns
139/tcp open     netbios-ssn
445/tcp open     microsoft-ds
MAC Address: 00:AA:4D:2F:4D:A2 (Giga-byte Technology Co.)


Interesting ports on 192.168.5.31:

PORT    STATE    SERVICE
137/tcp filtered netbios-ns
139/tcp open     netbios-ssn
445/tcp open     microsoft-ds
MAC Address: 3C:B9:2B:76:A6:08 (Unknown)
….
…..

 

 

How rescue unbootable Windows PC, Windows files through files Network copy to remote server shared Folder using Hirens Boot CD

Saturday, November 12th, 2011

hirens-boot-cd-logo-how-to-rescue-unbootable-pc-with-hirens-bootcd
I'm rescuing some files from one unbootable Windows XP using a livecd with Hirens Boot CD 13

In order to rescue the three NTFS Windows partitions files, I mounted them after booting a Mini Linux from Hirens Boot CD.

Mounting NTFS using Hirens BootCD went quite smoothly to mount the 3 partitions I used cmds:

# mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1
# mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/sda2
# mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/sdb1

After the three NTFS file partitions are mounted I used smbclient to list all the available Network Shares on the remote Network Samba Shares Server which by the way possessed the NETBIOS name of SERVER 😉

# smbclient -L //SERVER/
Enter root's password:
Domain=[SERVER] OS=[Windows 7 Ultimate 7600] Server=[Windows 7 Ultimate 6.1]

Sharename Type Comment
——— —- ——-
!!!MUSIC Disk
ADMIN$ Disk Remote Admin
C$ Disk Default share
Canon Inkjet S9000 (Copy 2) Printer Canon Inkjet S9000 (Copy 2)
D$ Disk Default share
Domain=[SERVER] OS=[Windows 7 Ultimate 7600] Server=[Windows 7 Ultimate 6.1]
Server Comment
——— ——-
Workgroup Master
——— ——-

Further on to mount the //SERVER/D network samba drive – (the location where I wanted to transfer the files from the above 3 mounted partitions):

# mkdir /mnt/D
# mount //192.168.0.100/D /mnt/D
#

Where the IP 192.168.0.100 is actually the local network IP address of the //SERVER win smb machine.

Afterwards I used mc to copy all the files I needed to rescue from all the 3 above mentioned win partitions to the mounted //SERVER/D