Posts Tagged ‘somebody’

My PHP/ MySQL Restaurant Reservation Form

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

Two months ago, I’ve developed a contact reservation form in PHP. The form is really easily customizable and is straight forward to integrate.
I’ve developed the form for a small restaurant which was missing the feature on it’s joomla based website in order to be able for restaurant clients to reserve tables.

Here is how my restaurant reservation form looks like:

hip0's plain php restaurant reservation form

Later on I found there are plenty of possibilities to easily make a reservation form in Joomla but at that time I had no idea that custom contact forms can be prepared with Joomla, so I developed my own one from scratch in plain PHP and MySQL.

The form’s fields are in Dutch, because the form I’ve developed for a Dutch restaurant.
However changing the form text is really easy,to do so open the php file and modify it, according to your needs.
I decided to share here the reservation form in hope that it might be helpful to somebody out there.
The Reservation form is licensed under GPLv2 so you’re very welcome to distribute and modify it freely.

The form installation is described in the README file you will find bundled with the reservation form archive.

You can d Download my PHP restaurant reservation form here

Feedback on the form is very welcome!
 

Create PDF file from (png, jpg, gif ) images / pictures in Linux

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

I’ve recently received a number of images in JPEG format as a feedback on a project plan that was constructed by a team I’m participating at the university where I study.

Somebody from my project group has scanned or taken snapshots of each of the hard copy paper feedback and has sent it to my mail.

I’ve received 13 images so I had to open them one by one to get each of the Project Plan to read the feedback on the page this was really unhandy, so I decided to give it a try on how to generate a common PDF file from all my picture files.

Thanksfully it happened to be very easy and trivial using the good old Image Magick

In order to complete the task of generating one PDF from a number of pictures all I did was.1. Switch to the directory where I have saved all my jpeg images

debian:~# cd /home/hipo/Desktop/my_images_directory/

2. Use the convert binary part of imagemagick package to generate the actual PDF file from the group of images

debian:~# convert *.jpg outputpdffile.pdf

If the images are numbered and contain many scanned pages of course you can always pass by all the images to the /usr/bin/convert binary, like for instance:

debian:~# convert 1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg 4.jpg 5.jpg outputpdffile.pdf
Even though in my case I had to convert to PDF from multiple JPEG (JPG) pictures, convertion with convert is not restricted to convert only from JPEG, but you can also convert to PDF by using other graphical file formats.

For instance to convert multiple PNG pictures to a single PDF file the command will be absolutely the same except you change the file extension of the graphic files e.g.:

debian:~# convert 1.PNG 2.PNG 3.PNG 4.PNG 5.PNG OUTPUT-PDF-FILE.PDF

I was quite happy eventually to know Linux is so flexible and such a trivial things are able to be completed in such an easy way.

Tightening PHP Security on Apache 2.2 with ModSecurity2 on Debian Lenny Linux

Monday, April 26th, 2010

Tightening-PHP-Security-on-Apache-2.2-2.4-with-Apache-ModSecurity2
In this article you'll learn how I easily installed and configured the ModSecurity 2 on a Debian Lenny system.
First let me give you a few introductionary words to modsecurity, what is it and why it's a good idea to install and use it on your Apache Webserver.

ModSecurity is an Apache module that provides intrusion detection and prevention for web applications. It aims at shielding web applications from known and unknown attacks, such as SQL injection attacks, cross-site scripting, path traversal attacks, etc.

As you can see from ModSecurity’s description it’s a priceless module add on to Apache that is able to protect your PHP Applications and Apache server from a huge number of hacker attacks undertook against your Online Web Application or Webserver.
The only thing I don’t like about this module is that it is actually a 3rd party module (e.g. not officially part of Apache). Some time ago I remember there was even an exploit for one of the versions of the module.
So in some cases the ModSecurity could also pose a security risk, so beware!
However if you know what you'rre doing and you keep a regular track of security news on some major security websites, that shouldn’t be a concern for you.
Now let'ss proceed to the install of the ModSecurity module itself.
The install is a piece of cake on Debian though you'll be required to use the Debian Lenny backports

Here is the install of the module step by step:

1. First add the gpg key of the backports repository to your install

debian-server:~# gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys C514AF8E4BA401C3
# another possible way to add the repository as the website describes is through the command
debian-server:~# wget -O - http://backports.org/debian/archive.key | apt-key add -

2. Install the libapache-mod-security package from the backports Debian Lenny repository

debian-server~:~# apt-get -t lenny-backports install libapache2-mod-security2

Now as a last step of the install ModSeccurity install procedure you have to add some configuration directives to Apache and restart the server afterwards.

– Open your /etc/apache2/apache2.conf and place in it the following configurations


<IfModule mod_security2.c>
# Basic configuration options
SecRuleEngine On
SecRequestBodyAccess On
SecResponseBodyAccess Off

# Handling of file uploads
# TODO Choose a folder private to Apache.
# SecUploadDir /opt/apache-frontend/tmp/
SecUploadKeepFiles Off

# Debug log
SecDebugLog /var/log/apache2/modsec_debug.log
SecDebugLogLevel 0

# Serial audit log
SecAuditEngine RelevantOnly
SecAuditLogRelevantStatus ^5
SecAuditLogParts ABIFHZ
SecAuditLogType Serial
SecAuditLog /var/log/apache2/modsec_audit.log

# Maximum request body size we will
# accept for buffering
SecRequestBodyLimit 131072

# Store up to 128 KB in memory SecRequestBodyInMemoryLimit 131072
# Buffer response bodies of up to # 512 KB in length SecResponseBodyLimit 524288
</IfModule>

The ModSecurity2 module would be properly installed and configured as an Apache module.
3.All left is to restart Apache in order the new module and configurations to take effect.

debian-server:~# /etc/init.d/apache restart

Don’t forget to check the apache conf file for errors before restarting the Apache with the above command for that to happen issue the command:
debian-server:~# apache2ctl -t

If all is fine you should get as an output:

Syntax OK

4. Next to find out if the Apache ModSecurity2 module is enabled and already used by Apache as a mean of protection you,
you might want to check if the log files modsec_audit.log and modsec_debug.log files has grown and doesfeed a new content.
If they’re growing and you see messages concerning the operation of the ModSecurity2 Apache module that’s a sure sign all is fine.
5. As we have the Mod Security Apache module configured on our Debian Server, now we will need to apply some ModSecurity Core Rules .
In short ModSecurity Core Rules are some critical protection rules against attacks across almost every web architecture.
Another really neat thing about Core Rules (CRS) for ModSecurity is that they are written with a performance in mind.
So enabling this filter rules won’t be a too heavy load for your Apache server.

Here is how to install the core rules:

6. Download latest ModSecurity Code Rules

Download them from the following Code Rule url
At the time of writting this article the latest code rules are version modsecurity-crs_2.0.6.tar.gz

To download and install this rules issue some commands like:

debian-server:~# wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/mod-security/files/modsecurity-crs/0-CURRENT/modsecurity-crs_2.0.6.tar.gz/download
debian-server:~# cp -rpf ~/modsecurity-crs_2.0.6.tar.gz /etc/apache2/
debian-server:~# cd /etc/apache2/; tar -zxvvf modsecurity-crs_2.0.6.tar.gz

Besides physically storing the unarchived modsecirity-crs in your /etc/apache2 it’s also necessery to add to your Apache Ifmodule mod_security.c block of code the following two lines:

Include /etc/apache2/modsecurity-crs_2.0.6/*.conf
Include /etc/apache2/modsecurity-crs_2.0.6/base_rules/*.conf

Thus ultimately the configuration concerning ModSecurity in your Apache Server configuration should look like the following:

<IfModule mod_security2.c>
# Basic configuration options
SecRuleEngine On
SecRequestBodyAccess On
SecResponseBodyAccess Off

# Handling of file uploads
# TODO Choose a folder private to Apache.
# SecUploadDir /opt/apache-frontend/tmp/
SecUploadKeepFiles Off

# Debug log
SecDebugLog /var/log/apache2/modsec_debug.log
SecDebugLogLevel 0

# Serial audit log
SecAuditEngine RelevantOnly
SecAuditLogRelevantStatus ^5
SecAuditLogParts ABIFHZ
SecAuditLogType Serial
SecAuditLog /var/log/apache2/modsec_audit.log

# Maximum request body size we will
# accept for buffering
SecRequestBodyLimit 131072

# Store up to 128 KB in memory
SecRequestBodyInMemoryLimit 131072
SecRequestBodyInMemoryLimit 131072

# Buffer response bodies of up to
# 512 KB in length
SecResponseBodyLimit 524288
Include /etc/apache2/modsecurity-crs_2.0.6/*.conf
Include /etc/apache2/modsecurity-crs_2.0.6/base_rules/*.conf
</Ifmodule>

Once again you have to check if everything is fine with Apache configurations with:

debian-server:~# apache2ctl -t

If it’s showing once again an OK status. Then you’re ready to restart the Webserver.
debian-server:~# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

One example goodness of setting up the ModSecurity + the Core rule sets are that after the above described installationis fully functional.

ModSecurity will be able to track if somebody tries to execute PHP Shell on your server .
ModSecurity will catch, log and block (forbid) requests to r99.txt, r59, safe0ver and possibly other hacked modifications of the php shell script

That’s it! Now Enjoy your tightened Apache Security and Hopefully catch the script kiddie trying to h4x0r yoU 🙂

Reset Windows (NT, 2000, XP, Vista and Windows 7) password / Reset Windows Forgotten Password / Reset Windows Administrator password

Friday, March 12th, 2010

Recently I was in the Pomorie’s Monastery – St. George .
One layman left his notebook (maybe as a donation) to the monks. However the notebook was protected by both: fingerprint check, as well as administrator password and therefore the notebook was completely unusable and was thrown away with many other unused belongings.
When the abbot of the monastery found out I’m adept with computers, he asked if I can fix up the notebook and somehow remove the password, or reinstall the machine to make it usable.
So here I decided to blog what I undertook to reset the windows password with the hope somebody else could benefit from that as well.

1. Go to Offline NT Password & Registry Editor, Bootdisk / CD website

2. Download the bootable CD image zip archive of Offline NT Password & Registry Editor and burn the iso to a CD using K3b (on Linux), Nero or CDBurnerXP on (Windows).

3. Follow the step by step walkthrough manual (here) to either change Some Windows user password or completely reset administrator or any other user password.

Following the walkthrough literally prooved to be quite succesful for me and I was able to properly reset the administrator password!
So Hooray it works again! The monks can now benefit of the cute Toshiba satellite machine.