Posts Tagged ‘system hardware’

Monitoring CPU load and memory usage on Mac OS X command line (Terminal)

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

macosx-server-screenshot-server-assistant-apple-tool
You might be stunned to find out Mac OS X has a server variant called Mac OS X server. For the usual admin having to administer a Mac OS X based server is something rarely to do, however it might happen some day, and besides that nowadays Mac OS X has about 10% percentage share of PC desktop and laptops used on the Internet (data collected from w3cschools log files). Thus cause it is among popular OSes, it very possible sooner or later as a sysadmin you will have to troubleshoot issues on at least Mac OS X notebook. Mac has plenty of instruments to debug OS issues as it is UNIX (BSD) based

Mac OS X has already a GUI tool called Activity Monitor (existing in Mac OS 10.3 onwards) in earlier verions, there was tool called Process Viewer and CPU Monitor.

To start Activity Monitor open Finder and launch it via:

Applications -> Utilities -> Activity Monitor

As a Linux guy, I like to use command line and there Mac OS X is equipped with a good arsenal of tools to check CPU load and Memory. Mac OS X comes with sar – (system activity reporter), top (process monitor) and vm_stat (virtual memory statistics) command – these ones are equivalent of Linux's sar (from sysstats package), top and Linux vmstat (report virtual memory statistics).

1. Check out Mac OS X HDD Input / Output statistics
 

$ sar -d -f ~/output.sar

20:43:18   device    r+w/s    blks/s
New Disk: [disk0] IODeviceTree:/PCI0@0/RP06@1C,5/SSD0@0/PRT0@0/PMP@0/@0:0
New Disk: [disk1] IOService:/IOResources/IOHDIXController/IOHDIXHDDriveOutKernel@1/IODiskImageBlockStorageDeviceOutKernel/IOBlockStorageDriver/Apple UDIF, только для чтения, сжатый (zlib)
New Disk: [disk2] IOService:/IOResources/IOHDIXController/IOHDIXHDDriveOutKernel@3/IODiskImageBlockStorageDeviceOutKernel/IOBlockStorageDriver/Apple UDIF, только для чтения, сжатый (bzip2)
New Disk: [disk3] IOService:/IOResources/IOHDIXController/IOHDIXHDDriveOutKernel@4/IODiskImageBlockStorageDeviceOutKernel/IOBlockStorageDriver/Apple UDIF, только для чтения, сжатый (bzip2)
New Disk: [disk4] IOService:/IOResources/IOHDIXController/IOHDIXHDDriveOutKernel@6/IODiskImageBlockStorageDeviceOutKernel/IOBlockStorageDriver/Apple UDIF, только для чтения, сжатый (zlib)
20:43:28   disk0        7        312
20:43:28   disk1        0          0
20:43:28   disk2        0          0
20:43:28   disk3        0          0
20:43:28   disk4        0          0
20:43:38   disk0       12        251
20:43:38   disk1        0          

2. Checking Mac OS X CPU Load from terminal

To check Load from Mac OS command line use:
 

$ sar -o ~/output.sar 10 10

That gathers 10 sets of metrics at 10 second intervals. You can then extract useful information from the output file (even while it's still running), this will get you cpu load on Mac OS system spitting stats every 10 seconds.

 

21:22:33  %usr  %nice   %sys   %idle
21:22:43    7      0      2     90
21:22:53    8      0      3     89
21:23:03   11      0      4     85
21:23:13    9      0      3     88
21:23:23    9      0      3     88
21:23:33    7      0      3     90
21:23:43   10      0      3     87
21:23:53   10      0      4     85
21:24:03   10      0      5     85
21:24:13    8      0      3     88
Average:      8      0      3     87   


3. Checking Free memory on  Mac OS X

Use this obscure one liner to free -m Linux memory command like output from Mac terminal

$ vm_stat | perl -ne '/page size of (d+)/ and $size=$1; /Pagess+([^:]+)[^d]+(d+)/ and printf("%-16s % 16.2f Min", "$1:", $2 * $size / 1048576);'
 

free: 43.38 Mi
active: 1762.00 Mi
inactive: 1676.91 Mi
speculative: 3.29 Mi
wired down: 609.38 Mi
copy-on-write: 29431.01 Mi
zero filled: 4687689.80 Mi
reactivated: 30288.86 Mi


To show inactive memory in Gigabytes every 10 seconds

$ vm_stat 10 | awk 'NR>2 {gsub("K","000");print ($1+$4)/256000}'

1.70532
1.70455
1.70389
1.6904

 

It is also possible to get memory statistics on Mac PC running top in non-interactive mode and grepping it from output:

$ top -l 1 | head -n 10 | grep PhysMem | sed 's/, /n /g'

 

PhysMem: 599M wired, 1735M active, 1712M inactive, 4046M used, 47M free.

 

4. Quick command to get Kernel / how many CPUs, available memory and load avarage on Mac OS X

From y. 2003 onwards of Mac OS have hostinfo(host information) command, providing admin with quick way to get System Info on Mac OS

$ hostinfo

 

Mach kernel version:
Darwin Kernel Version 12.5.0: Sun Sep 29 13:33:47 PDT 2013; root:xnu-2050.48.12~1/RELEASE_X86_64
Kernel configured for up to 4 processors.
2 processors are physically available.
4 processors are logically available.
Processor type: i486 (Intel 80486)
Processors active: 0 1 2 3
Primary memory available: 4.00 gigabytes
Default processor set: 98 tasks, 621 threads, 4 processors
Load average: 1.63, Mach factor: 2.54

 


If you need more verbose information on system hardware and resources, check out system_profiler. As the manual describes it, system_profiler(reports system hardware and software configuration.) cmd:

$ system_profiler Here is a link to output file generated by system_prifler

 

 

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How to disable PC Spaker on Debian and Ubuntu Linux

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

 

How to disable pc-speaker on Linux / PC-Speaker Old Desktop Computer picture

A PC Speaker is helpful as it could be used as a tool for diagnosing system hardware failures (different systems produce different beep sequences depending on the machine BIOS type).
Using the instructions for the respective BIOS vendor and version one could determine the type of problem experienced by a machine based on the sequence and frequency of sounds produced by the SPEAKER.
Lets say a hardware component on a server is down with no need for a monitor or screen to be attached you can say precisely if it is the hard drive, memory or fan malfunctioning…

Generally speaking historically embedded PC Speaker was inseparatable part of the Personal Computers, preceding the soundblasters, now this is changing but for compitability sake many comp equipment vendors still produce machines with pc-speaker in.
Some newer machines (mostly laptops) are factory produced with no PC-SPEAKER component anymore.
For those who don't know what is PC SPEAKER, it is a hardware device capable of emitting very simple short beep sounds at certain system occasions.

Talking about PC-Speaker, it reminds me of the old computer days, where we used pc-speakers to play music in DOS quite frequently.
It was wide practice across my friends and myself to use the pc-speaker to play Axel Folly and other mod files because we couldn't afford to pay 150$ for a sound cards. Playing a song over pc-speaker is quite a nice thing and it will be a nice thing if someone writes a program to be able to play songs on Linux via the pc-speaker for the sake of experiment.

As of time of writting, I don't know of any application capable of playing music files via the pc-speaker if one knows of something like this please, drop me a comment..

As long as it is used for hardware failure diagnosis the speaker is useful, however there are too many occasions where its just creating useless annoying sounds.
For instance whether one uses a GUI terminal or console typing commands and hits multiple times backspace to delete a mistyped command. The result is just irritating beeps, which could be quite disturbing for other people in the room (for example if you use Linux as Desktop in heterogeneous OS office).
When this "unplanned" glitchering beeps are experienced 100+ times a day you really want to break the computer, as well as your collegues are starting to get mad (if not using their headphones) 🙂

Hence you need sometimes to turn off the pc-speaker to save some nerves.

Here is how this is done on major Linux distros.

On Debian and most other distros, the PC SPEAKER is controlled by a kernel module, so to disable communication with the speaker you have to remove the kernel module.

On Debian and Fedora disabling pcspeaker is done with:

# modprobe -r pcspkr

Then to permanently disable load of the pcspkr module on system boot:

debian:~# echo 'blacklist pcspkr' >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

On Ubuntu to disable load on boot /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist, file should be used:

ubuntu:~# echo 'blacklist pcspkr' >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist
Well that's all folks …

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Reboot Safely a frozen (hanged up) Linux Server with Magic SysRQ Key combination

Monday, June 20th, 2011

Linux Magic SysRQ Key picture

Being a remote system administrator for many years from now, I’ve experienced many times sudden Linux crashes, mostly caused by system hardware overloads.

This is a common thing especially on busy Web Servers with (Apache/MySQL). Situations like this are really messy and many times in order to bringt the server back online, one has to either physically go to the Data Center or contact the Technical support to request a server reboot.

In this terrible times, data loss might occur if the Server reset button is used to cold reboot it.

Happily in 99% of the cases the data loss which might occur could be prevented with Linux’s kernel capability to support the Magic SysRQ key !

Having the Magic SysRQ key functionality being supported in Linux in past times wasn’t that common, thanksfully these days this has changed andlmost every Linux distrubution supports this handy feature.

Now you might wonder what is the magic with those Magic SysRQ key ?

Let me explain, Magic SysRQ is a kernel level functionality which supports even completely crashed Linux systems with the horrifying:

Kernel Panic
message to be properly shutdown.

Using Magic SysRQ instead of the mostly used indiced cold reboots is really advantageous, as all the opened files by programs on the crashed server which hanged will be properly saved and closed and thus possible data loss caused by the sudden server crash will be minimized.

One other good thing about the Magic SysRQ Key keyboard combination is that initiating the Magic SysRQ could be made blindly (no need for server monitor or display to present any error messages on the failed server).

Now to check if the magic sysrq is enabled on a server one should issue the command:

Here are some Magic SysRQ keyboard combinations one can use in case of server failure:

ALT+SYSRQ+M to dump memory info;
ALT+SYSRQ+P to dump processes states;
ALT+SYSRQ+S to sync disks;
ALT+SYSRQ+U to unmount all mounted filesystems;
ALT+SYSRQ+E to terminate processes;
ALT+SYSRQ+I to kill all processes
ALT+SYSRQ+U to try to unmount once again;
ALT+SYSRQ+B to reboot.

I would skip to explain what each of the keyboard combinations will do as I believe the above description explains it well.

One classics of combinations one might want to issue on a failed Linux server supporting the Magic SysRQ would be:

ALT+SYSRQ+R
ALT+SYSRQ+E
ALT+SYSRQ+I
ALT+SYSRQ+S
ALT+SYSRQ+U
ALT+SYSRQ+B

The ALT+SYSRQ+REISUB key combination is very popular among system administrators.
Also Magic SysRQ is heavily used by kernel developers as it includes many handy debugging options.

If you try the Magic SysRQ key on older servers and you realize it doesn’t react you will have to recompile the linux kernel and enable the CONFIG_MAGIC_SYSRQ kernel time compilation option.

The Magic SysRQ can also be initiated remotely on a properly running server 😉 by initiating:

server:~# echo b > /proc/sysrq-trigger

This command would be useful if you want to just have fun and test that magic sysrq works on your system for sure 😉

To sum it up using the Magic SysRQ will guarantee your locked up, server a Safe Reboot and will hopefully save you a lot of time for backups recovery.

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