Posts Tagged ‘tabs’

ConEmu and Clink – Add Linux shell shortcuts, tabs and tab completion to Windows command line – Far Manager Windows text file explorer

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

If you're a Linux geek and forced to work on Windows for some reason. You will probably want to add some Linux & Feel to Windows console. Yesterday in a discussion with a colleague who is considered to be our team's Windows Guru, I noticed his Windows 7 command line looks slightly different and asked him, "is it some cmd.exe customization?" and this is how I learned about existence of ConEmu and Clink.
ConEmu is advanced console window where you can run any shell of your choice.

conemu-tabbed-command-prompt-cmd-wrapper-like-gnome-terminal-for-windows

ConEmu (Console Emulator) + Clink combination is very much like MobaXterm (tabbed SSH client and win cmd line) in many sense except it doesn't have an embbed ssh support client. By using Conemu + Clink (Powerful bash style line editing) wrappers to cmd.exe you get the invaluable Linux / UNIX tab completion, command line shortcuts like CTRL + R, CTRL + A, CTRL + P etc. into Windows OS. ConEmu is very useful in Windows environments when you have to heavily use Windows PowerShell

If you're get used to Linux's Midnight Commander (MC)  and you're looking for MC for Windows you will certainly want to check out Far Manager (File and Archive Manager). Far Manager provides simple and intuitive ncurses (mc) like interface on Windows and supports view, edit, copy rename and a lot of other basic operations supported also by mc.

far-manager-mc-like-text-file-browser-for-windows-linux-mc-windows-alternative-software


Clink combines the native Windows shell cmd.exe with the powerful command line editing features of the GNU Readline library, which provides rich completion, history, and line-editing capabilities. Readline is well-known and used in Unix shell Bash, the standard shell for Mac OS X and most of Linux distributions.

In my view coolest Clink command shortcut is reverse-search allowing you to auto-type by letters commands (from command line history), lets say you want to invoke dir – you press CTRL + r and type D and all occurances earlier typed starting with "d", pops up as possible choice.

clink_bring-linux-bash-shell-powerful-command-line-editing-for-windows
Everyone who had to administer Windows servers know how annoying is that by default cmd.exe doesn't support window resize.
Using ConEmu solves that as it supports resize of command prompt Window (horizontal and vertical resize).
ConEmu has a status bar, support (configuration colors) and even transperancy but most importantly for old school dos geeks is that it supports integration with dosbox run old DOS applications (games) in Windows 7.

To use the tools use gui installers, here is latest mirror copy of Conemu (for download), current latest Far Manager release and latest present release of Clink (download link). Once installed it is a must to spend some time configure ConEmu to match your preferences. To configure it press with right mouse button on top of Cemu window and do the needful 🙂

windows-conemu-good-substitute-for-linux-bash-shell-for-microsoft-windows-users-split-screen-how-to-tab-completion-windows
Once everything is installed, you will have to get into the habit to launch ConEmu instead of cmd.exe (as ConEmu doesn't interfere with cmd.exe). To launch far manager from ConEmu command line simply type:

C:> far

To open new tabs in ConEmu the well known Firefox used CTRL + T will not work, but 'open new tab' key shortcut can be customized and also set to CTRL + T.  Default key shortcut for opening new tab in ConEmu is 'Windows Button' + SHIFT + W. While Opening new consoles in ConEmu, there is also the useful option of Splitting console (top and right).

Here is also list with all Clink command shortcuts

C-@     : set-mark
C-a     : beginning-of-line
C-b     : backward-char
C-c     : ctrl-c
C-d     : delete-char
C-e     : end-of-line
C-f     : forward-char
C-g     : abort
C-h     : backward-delete-char
C-i     : clink-completion-shim
C-j     : accept-line
C-k     : kill-line
C-l     : clear-screen
C-m     : accept-line
C-n     : next-history
C-p     : previous-history
C-q     : reload-lua-state
C-r     : reverse-search-history
C-s     : forward-search-history
C-t     : transpose-chars
C-u     : unix-line-discard
C-v     : paste-from-clipboard
C-w     : unix-word-rubout
C-y     : yank
C-z     : undo
C-]     : character-search
C-_     : undo
A-C-c   : copy-line-to-clipboard
A-C-e   : expand-env-vars
A-C-g   : abort
A-C-h   : backward-kill-word
A-C-i   : tab-insert
A-C-j   : vi-editing-mode
A-C-m   : vi-editing-mode
A-C-r   : revert-line
A-C-u   : up-directory
A-C-y   : yank-nth-arg
A-C-[   : complete
A-C-]   : character-search-backward
A-      : set-mark
A-#     : insert-comment
A-&     : tilde-expand
A-*     : insert-completions
A–     : digit-argument
A-.     : yank-last-arg
A-0     : digit-argument
A-1     : digit-argument
A-2     : digit-argument
A-3     : digit-argument
A-4     : digit-argument
A-5     : digit-argument
A-6     : digit-argument
A-7     : digit-argument
A-8     : digit-argument
A-9     : digit-argument
A-<     : beginning-of-history
A-=     : possible-completions
A->     : end-of-history
A-?     : possible-completions
A-     : delete-horizontal-space
A-_     : yank-last-arg
A-b     : backward-word
A-c     : capitalize-word
A-d     : kill-word
A-f     : forward-word
A-h     : show-rl-help
A-l     : downcase-word
A-n     : non-incremental-forward-search-history
A-p     : non-incremental-reverse-search-history
A-r     : revert-line
A-t     : transpose-words
A-u     : upcase-word
A-y     : yank-pop
A-~     : tilde-expand
C-x,C-g : abort
C-x,C-r : re-read-init-file
C-x,C-u : undo
C-x,C-x : exchange-point-and-mark
C-x,(   : start-kbd-macro
C-x,)   : end-kbd-macro
C-x,e   : call-last-kbd-macro


 

 

 

Upgrading Skype 2.0 to Skype 2.2 beta on Debian GNU / Linux – Skype Mic hell

Saturday, December 31st, 2011

Making Skype work with Alsa on Debian GNU / Linux

Though, I'm GNU / Linux user for many years now. I have to say, everything is not so perfect as many people present it.
Configuring even simple things related to multimedia on Linux is often a complete nightmare.
An example, today I've decided to upgrade my 32 bit Skype version 2.0 beta for Linux to 64 bit Skype 2.2 beta .
The reason I was motivated to upgrade skype was basicly 2.

a) My Skype run through 32 bit binary emulation with /usr/bin/linux32

b) I had issues with my skype if someone give me a Skype Call, while I have a flash video or some other stream in Browser (let's say Youtube).
Actually being unable to receive a skype call or initiate one while I have some kind of music running in the background or just some kind of Youtube video paused was really annoying. Hence until now, everytime I wanted to speak over skype I had to close all Browser windows or tabs that are using my sound card and then restart my Skype program ….

Just imagine how ridiculous is that especially for a modern Multimedia supporting OS as Linux is. Of course the problems, I've experienced wasn't directly a problem of Linux. The problems are caused by the fact I have to use the not well working proprietary software version of Skype on my Debian GNU / Linux.
I would love to actually boycott Skype as RMS recommends, but unfortunately until now I can't, since many of my friends as well as employers use Skype to connect with me on daily basis.
So in a way I had to migrate to newer version of skype in order to make my Linux experience a bit more desktop like …

Back to the my skype 2.0 to 2.2. beta upgrade story, the overall Skype upgrade procedure was easy and went smootlhy, setting correct capturing later on however was a crazy task ….
Here is the step by step to follow to make my upgraded skype and internal notebook mic play nice together:

1. Download 64 bit Skype for Debian from skype.com

For the sake of preservation in case it disappears in future, I've made a mirror of skype for debian you can download here
My upgrade example below uses directly the 64 bit Skype 2.2beta binary mirror:

Here are the cmds once can issue if he has to upgrade to 2.2beta straight using my mirrored skype:

debian:~# wget http://www.pc-freak.net/files/skype-debian_2.2.0.35-1_amd64.deb
...

2. Remove the old version of skype

In my case I have made my previous skype installation using .tar.bz2 archive and not a debian package, however for some testing I also had a version of skype 2.0beta installed as a deb so for the sake of clarity I removed the existing skype deb install:

debian:~# dpkg -r skype
...

3. Install skype-debian_2.2.0.35-1_amd64.deb downloaded deb

debian:~# dpkg -i skype-debian_2.2.0.35-1_amd64.deb
...

After installing skype, I installed pavucontrol A volume control for the PulseAudio sound server

4. Install pavucontrol

debian:~# apt-get install pavucontrol

PavUcontrol PulseAudio mixer screenshot

Pavucontrol has plenty of sound configurations and enables the user to change many additional settings which cannot be tuned in alsamixer

pavucontrol was necessery to play with until I managed to make my microphone able to record.

5. Build and install latest Debian (Testing) distribution alsa driver

debian:~# aptitude install module-assistant
debian:~# m-a prepare
debian:~# aptitude -t testing install alsa-source
debian:~# m-a build alsa
debian:~# m-a install alsa
debian:~# rmmod snd_hda_intel snd_pcm snd_timer snd soundcore snd_page_alloc
debian:~# modprobe snd_hda_intel
debian:~# echo 'options snd-hda-intel model=auto' >> /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-base.conf

In my case removing the sound drivers and loading them once again did not worked, so I had to reboot my system before the new compiled alsa sound modules gets loaded …
The last line echo 'options snd-hda-intel model=auto' … was necessery for my Thinkpard r61 Intel audio to work out. For some clarity my exact sb model is:

debian:~$ lspci |grep -i audio
00:1b.0 Audio device: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) HD Audio Controller (rev 03)

For other notebooks with different sound drivers echo 'options snd-hda-intel model=auto' … should be omitted.

6. Tune microphone and sound settings in alsamixer

debian:~$ alsamixer

Alsamixer Select Soundcard Debian Linux Screenshot
Right after launching alsamixer I had to press F6: Select Sound Card and choose my sound card (0 HDA Intel).

Following my choice I unmuted all the microphones and enabled Microphone Boost as well as did some adjustments to the MIC volume level.

Alsamixer My Intel SoundCard Debian Linux

Setting proper MIC Volume levels is absolutely necessery, otherwise there is a constant noise getting out of the speakers …

7. Use aumix to set some other sound settings

For some unclear reasons, besides alsamixer , I often had to fix stuff in aumix . Honestly I don't understand where exactly aumix fits in the picture with Alsa and my loaded alsa sound blaster module?? If someone can explain I'll be thankful.

Launch aumix to further adjust some sound settings …

debian:~$ aumix

Aumix Debian GNU Linux Squeeze Screenshot

In above screenshot you see, my current aumix settings which works okay with mic and audio output.

9. Test Microphone the mic is capturing sounds correctly

Set ~/.asoundrc configuration for Skype

Edit ~/.asoundrc and put in:

pcm.pulse {
type pulse
}
ctl.pulse {
type pulse
}
pcm.!default {
type pulse
}
ctl.!default {
type pulse
}
pcm.card0 {
type hw
card 0
}
ctl.card0 {
type hw
card 0
}
pcm.dsp0 { type plug slave.pcm "hw:0,0" }
pcm.dmixout {
# Just pass this on to the system dmix
type plug
slave {
pcm "dmix"
}
}
pcm.skype {
type asym
playback.pcm "skypeout"
capture.pcm "skypein"
}
pcm.skypein {
# Convert from 8-bit unsigned mono (default format set by aoss when
# /dev/dsp is opened) to 16-bit signed stereo (expected by dsnoop)
#
# We cannot just use a "plug" plugin because although the open will
# succeed, the buffer sizes will be wrong and we will hear no sound at
# all.
type route
slave {
pcm "skypedsnoop"
format S16_LE
}
ttable {
0 {0 0.5}
1 {0 0.5}
}
}
pcm.skypeout {
# Just pass this on to the system dmix
type plug
slave {
pcm "dmix"
}
}
pcm.skypedsnoop {
type dsnoop
ipc_key 1133
slave {
# "Magic" buffer values to get skype audio to work
# If these are not set, opening /dev/dsp succeeds but no sound
# will be heard. According to the ALSA developers this is due
# to skype abusing the OSS API.
pcm "hw:0,0"
period_size 256
periods 16
buffer_size 16384
}
bindings {
0 0
}
}
I'm not 100% percent if putting those .asoundrc configurations are necessery. I've seen them on archlinux's wiki as a perscribed fix to multiple issues with Skype sound in / out.

Onwardds, for the sake of test if my sound settings set in pavucontrol enables the internal mic to capture sound I used two programs:

1. gnome-sound-recorder
2. arecord

gnome-sound-recorder GNU / Linux Screenshot
gnome-sound-recorder

gnome-sound-recorder is probably used by most GNOME users, though I'm sure Linux noviced did not play with it yet.

arecord is just a simple console based app to capture sound from the microphone. To test if the microphone works I captured a chunk of sounds with cmd:

debian:~$ arecord cow.wav
Recording WAVE 'cow.wav' : Unsigned 8 bit, Rate 8000 Hz, Mono

Later on I played the file with aplay (part of alsa-utils package in Debian), to check if I'll hear if mic succesfully captured my voice, e.g.:

debian:~$ play cow.wav
cow.wav:
File Size: 22.0k Bit Rate: 64.1k
Encoding: Unsigned PCM
Channels: 1 @ 8-bit
Samplerate: 8000Hz
Replaygain: off
Duration: 00:00:02.75
In:100% 00:00:02.75 [00:00:00.00] Out:22.0k [-=====|=====-] Clip:0
Done.

By the way, the aplay ASCII text equailizer is really awesome 😉 aplay is also capable of playing (Ogg Vorbis .ogg) free sound format.

Further on, I launched the new installed version of skype and tested Skype Calls (Mic capturing), with Skype Echo / Sound Test Service
I'll be glad to hear if this small article, helped anybody to fix any skype Linux related issues ?. I would be happy to hear also from people who had similar issues with a different fixes for skype on Linux.
Its also interesting to hear from Ubuntu and other distributions users if following this tutorial had somehow helped in resolving issues with Skype mic.

Poderosa a tabbed Terminal Emulator (PuTTY Windows Alternative)

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

Even though, I rarely use Windows to connect to remote servers using SSH or Telnet protocols in some cases I’m forced to do that (in cases I’m away from my Linux notebook). I’m doing my best to keep away from logging anywhere via SSH using Windows as when using Windows you never know what kind of spyware, malware or Viruses is already on the system, not to mention Microsoft are sniffing a lot if not everything which is typed on the keyboard… Anyways, usually I use Putty as a quick way to access a remote SSH, however pitily PuTTY lacks an embedded functionality for Tabs and each new connection to a server I had to run a new instance of PuTTY. This is okay if you need to access a single server but in some cases where access to multple servers is necessery lacking the tab functionality and starting 10 times putty is really irritating and one forgets what kind of connection is present on which PuTTY instance.

Earlier on, I’ve blogged about the existence of PuTTY Connection Manager PuTTY add-on program which is a PuTTY wrapper which enables PuTTY to be used with Connection Tabs feature, however installing two programs is quite inconvenient, especially if you have to do this every few days (in case if travelling a lot).

Luckily there is another terminal emulator free program for Windows called PodeRoSA which natively supports a tabbed Secure Shell connections.
If you want to get some experience with it check out Poderosa’s website , here is also a screenshot of the program running few ssh encrypted connections in tabs on a Windows host.

Poderosa Windows ssh / telnet tabs terminal emulator screenshot
Another good reason that one might consider using Poderosa instead of PuTTY is the Apache License under which Poderosa is developed. Currently the Apache License is compatible with GPL free software license which makes the program fully free software. The PuTTY license is under BSD and MIT and some other weird custom license not 100% compatible with GPL and hence PuTTY can be considered less free software in terms of freedom.

How to change / reset lost or forgot TightVNC administrator password

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

how-to-change-reset-lost-TightVNC-administrator-password

I have installed TightVNC to a Windows host just a few weeks ago in order to be able to manage remotely a Windows host and forgot to write down the administrator password 🙂 (stoopid!)

I had to explain to a friend remotely how to change the TightVNC admin password and it was a complete nightmare!

Shortly here is the exact menus one who wants to reset the password of a TigthVNC server after forgotten:

Start -> All Programs -> TightVNC
-> TightVNC Server (Service Mode) ->
TightVNC Service - Offline Configuration.

In the configuration dialog to popup there are the Server and Administration tabs through which a new password can be set.

After the password is change either a restart of the TightVNC server is necessery or a restart of the Windows PC.

Putty Connection Manager A Handy tip to make your PuTTY multi tab enabled

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009

Some time ago, I asked myself if there is a SSH/Telnet supporting Terminal program
for Windows which enables you to have a tabs with the opened connections to a number
of servers. Well after some time spent looking, I’ve came across the solution
which concludes to a nice PuTTy wrapper program called Putty Connection Manager .
Putty Connection Manager requires you to have PuTTY installed all it does it runs a multiple putty instances
each one opening in a nice multi tab windows, like the good old linux gnome-terminal.
Cheers!END—–