Posts Tagged ‘Uptime’

Monitoring MySQL server queries and debunning performance (slow query) issues with native MySQL commands and with mtop, mytop

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

If you're a Linux server administrator running MySQL server, you need to troubleshoot performance and bottleneck issues with the SQL database every now and then. In this article, I will pinpoint few methods to debug basic issues with MySQL database servers.

1. Troubleshooting MySQL database queries with native SQL commands

a)One way to debug errors and get general statistics is by logging in with mysql cli and check the mysql server status:

# mysql -u root -p
mysql> SHOW STATUS;
+-----------------------------------+------------+
| Variable_name | Value |
+-----------------------------------+------------+
| Aborted_clients | 1132 |
| Aborted_connects | 58 |
| Binlog_cache_disk_use | 185 |
| Binlog_cache_use | 2542 |
| Bytes_received | 115 |
.....
.....
| Com_xa_start | 0 |
| Compression | OFF |
| Connections | 150000 |
| Created_tmp_disk_tables | 0 |
| Created_tmp_files | 221 |
| Created_tmp_tables | 1 |
| Delayed_errors | 0 |
| Delayed_insert_threads | 0 |
| Delayed_writes | 0 |
| Flush_commands | 1 |
.....
.....
| Handler_write | 132 |
| Innodb_page_size | 16384 |
| Innodb_pages_created | 6204 |
| Innodb_pages_read | 8859 |
| Innodb_pages_written | 21931 |
.....
.....
| Slave_running | OFF |
| Slow_launch_threads | 0 |
| Slow_queries | 0 |
| Sort_merge_passes | 0 |
| Sort_range | 0 |
| Sort_rows | 0 |
| Sort_scan | 0 |
| Table_locks_immediate | 4065218 |
| Table_locks_waited | 196 |
| Tc_log_max_pages_used | 0 |
| Tc_log_page_size | 0 |
| Tc_log_page_waits | 0 |
| Threads_cached | 51 |
| Threads_connected | 1 |
| Threads_created | 52 |
| Threads_running | 1 |
| Uptime | 334856 |
+-----------------------------------+------------+
225 rows in set (0.00 sec)

SHOW STATUS; command gives plenty of useful info, however it is not showing the exact list of queries currently processed by the SQL server. Therefore sometimes it is exactly a stucked (slow queries) execution, you need to debug in order to fix a lagging SQL. One way to track this slow queries is via enabling mysql slow-query.log. Anyways enabling the slow-query requires a MySQL server restart and some critical productive database servers are not so easy to restart and the SQL slow queries have to be tracked "on the fly" so to say.
Therefore, to check the exact (slow) queries processed by the SQL server (without restarting it), do
 

mysql> SHOW processlist;
+——+——+—————+——+———+——+————–+——————————————————————————————————+
| Id | User | Host | db | Command | Time | State | Info |
+——+——+—————+——+———+——+————–+——————————————————————————————————+
| 609 | root | localhost | blog | Sleep | 5 | | NULL |
| 1258 | root | localhost | NULL | Sleep | 85 | | NULL |
| 1308 | root | localhost | NULL | Query | 0 | NULL | show processlist |
| 1310 | blog | pcfreak:64033 | blog | Query | 0 | Sending data | SELECT comment_author, comment_author_url, comment_content, comment_post_ID, comment_ID, comment_aut |
+——+——+—————+——+———+——+————–+——————————————————————————————————+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)
mysql>

SHOW processlist gives a good view on what is happening inside the SQL.

To get more complete information on SQL query threads use the full extra option:

mysql> SHOW full processlist;

This gives pretty full info on running threads, but unfortunately it is annoying to re-run the command again and again – constantly to press UP Arrow + Enter keys.

Hence it is useful to get the same command output, refresh periodically every few seconds. This is possible by running it through the watch command:

debian:~# watch "'show processlist' | mysql -u root -p'secret_password'"

watch will run SHOW processlist every 2 secs (this is default watch refresh time, for other timing use watch -n 1, watch -n 10 etc. etc.

The produced output will be similar to:

Every 2.0s: echo 'show processlist' | mysql -u root -p'secret_password' Thu May 10 17:24:19 2012

Id User Host db Command Time State Info
609 root localhost blog Sleep 3 NULL1258 root localhost NULL Sleep 649 NULL1542 blog pcfreak:64981 blog Query 0 Copying to tmp table \
SELECT p.ID, p.post_title, p.post_content,p.post_excerpt, p.pos
t_date, p.comment_count, count(t_r.o
1543 root localhost NULL Query 0 NULL show processlist

Though this "hack" is one of the possible ways to get some interactivity on what is happening inside SQL server databases and tables table. for administering hundred or thousand SQL servers running dozens of queries per second – monitor their behaviour few times aday using mytop or mtop is times easier.

Though, the names of the two tools are quite similar and I used to think both tools are one and the same, actually they're not but both are suitable for monitoring sql database execution in real time.

As a sys admin, I've used mytop and mtop, on almost each Linux server with MySQL server installed.
Both tools has helped me many times in debugging oddities with sql servers. Therefore my personal view is mytop and mtop should be along with the Linux sysadmin most useful command tools outfit, still I'm sure many administrators still haven't heard about this nice goodies.

1. Installing mytop on Debian, Ubuntu and other deb based GNU / Linux-es

mytop is available for easy install on Debian and across all debian / ubuntu and deb derivative distributions via apt.

Here is info obtained with apt-cache show

debian:~# apt-cache show mytop|grep -i description -A 3
Description: top like query monitor for MySQL
Mytop is a console-based tool for monitoring queries and the performance
of MySQL. It supports version 3.22.x, 3.23.x, 4.x and 5.x servers.
It's written in Perl and support connections using TCP/IP and UNIX sockets.

Installing the tool is done with the trivial:

debian:~# apt-get --yes install mytop
....

mtop used to be available for apt-get-ting in Debian Lenny and prior Debian releases but in Squeeze onwards, only mytop is included (probably due to some licensing incompitabilities with mtop??).

For those curious on how mtop / mytop works – both are perl scripts written to periodically connects to the SQL server and run commands similar to SHOW FULL PROCESSLIST;. Then, the output is parsed and displayed to the user.

Here how mytop running, looks like:

MyTOP showing queries running on Ubuntu 8.04 Linux - Debugging interactively top like MySQL

2. Installing mytop on RHEL and CentOS

By default in RHEL and CentOS and probably other RedHat based Linux-es, there is neither mtop nor mytop available in package repositories. Hence installing the tools on those is only available from 3rd parties. As of time of writting an rpm builds for RHEL and CentOS, as well as (universal rpm distros) src.rpm package is available on http://pkgs.repoforge.org/mytop/. For the sake of preservation – if in future those RPMs disappear, I made a mirror of mytop rpm's here

Mytop rpm builds depend on a package perl(Term::ReadKey), my attempt to install it on CentOS 5.6, returned following err:

[root@cenots ~]# rpm -ivh mytop-1.4-2.el5.rf.noarch.rpm
warning: mytop-1.4-2.el5.rf.noarch.rpm: Header V3 DSA signature: NOKEY, key ID 6b8d79e6
error: Failed dependencies:
perl(Term::ReadKey) is needed by mytop-1.4-2.el5.rf.noarch

The perl(Term::ReadKey package is not available in CentOS 5.6 and (probably other centos releases default repositories so I had to google perl(Term::ReadKey) I found it on http://rpm.pbone.net/ package repository, the exact url to the rpm dependency as of time of writting this post is:

ftp://ftp.pbone.net/mirror/yum.trixbox.org/centos/5/old/perl-Term-ReadKey-2.30-2.rf.i386.rpm

Quickest, way to install it is:

[root@centos ~]# rpm -ivh ftp://ftp.pbone.net/mirror/yum.trixbox.org/centos/5/old/perl-Term-ReadKey-2.30-2.rf.i386.rpmRetrieving ftp://ftp.pbone.net/mirror/yum.trixbox.org/centos/5/old/perl-Term-ReadKey-2.30-2.rf.i386.rpmPreparing... ########################################### [100%]
1:perl-Term-ReadKey ########################################### [100%]

This time mytop, install went fine:

[root@centos ~]# rpm -ivh mytop-1.4-2.el5.rf.noarch.rpm
warning: mytop-1.4-2.el5.rf.noarch.rpm: Header V3 DSA signature: NOKEY, key ID 6b8d79e6
Preparing... ########################################### [100%]
1:mytop ########################################### [100%]

To use it further, it is the usual syntax:

mytop -u username -p 'secret_password' -d database

CentOS Linux MyTOP MySQL query benchmark screenshot - vpopmail query

3. Installing mytop and mtop on FreeBSD and other BSDs

To debug the running SQL queries in a MySQL server running on FreeBSD, one could use both mytop and mtop – both are installable via ports:

a) To install mtop exec:

freebsd# cd /usr/ports/sysutils/mtop
freebsd# make install clean
....

b) To install mytop exec:

freebsd# cd /usr/ports/databases/mytop
freebsd# make install clean
....

I personally prefer to use mtop on FreeBSD, because once run it runs prompts the user to interactively type in the user/pass

freebsd# mtop

Then mtop prompts the user with "interactive" dialog screen to type in user and pass:

Mtop interactive type in username and password screenshot on FreeBSD 7.2

It is pretty annoying, same mtop like syntax don't show user/pass prompt:

freebsd# mytop
Cannot connect to MySQL server. Please check the:

* database you specified "test" (default is "test")
* username you specified "root" (default is "root")
* password you specified "" (default is "")
* hostname you specified "localhost" (default is "localhost")
* port you specified "3306" (default is 3306)
* socket you specified "" (default is "")
The options my be specified on the command-line or in a ~/.mytop
config file. See the manual (perldoc mytop) for details.
Here's the exact error from DBI. It might help you debug:
Unknown database 'test'

The correct syntax to run mytop instead is:

freebsd# mytop -u root -p 'secret_password' -d 'blog'

Or the longer more descriptive:

freebsd# mytop --user root --pass 'secret_password' --database 'blog'

By the way if you take a look at mytop's manual you will notice a tiny error in documentation, where the three options –user, –pass and –database are wrongly said to be used as -user, -pass, -database:

freebsd# mytop -user root -pass 'secret_password' -database 'blog'
Cannot connect to MySQL server. Please check the:

* database you specified "atabase" (default is "test")
* username you specified "ser" (default is "root")
* password you specified "ass" (default is "")
* hostname you specified "localhost" (default is "localhost")
* port you specified "3306" (default is 3306)
* socket you specified "" (default is "")a
...
Access denied for user 'ser'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

Actually it is interesting mytop, precededed historically mtop.
mtop was later written (probably based on mytop), to run on FreeBSD OS by a famous MySQL (IT) spec — Jeremy Zawodny .
Anyone who has to do frequent MySQL administration tasks, should already heard Zawodny's name.
For those who haven't, Jeremy used to be a head database administrators and developer in Yahoo! Inc. some few years ago.
His website contains plenty of interesting thoughts and writtings on MySQL server and database management
 

Monitoring Windows hosts with Nagios on Debian GNU/Linux

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

Nagios logo install and configure nagios to monitor Windows hosts with on Debian GNU/Linux

In this article in short, I’ll explain how I configured Nagios on a Debian GNU/Linux release (Squeeze 6) to monitor a couple of Windows hosts running inside a local network. Now let’s start.

1. Install necessery nagios debian packages

apt-get install nagios-images nagios-nrpe-plugin nagios-nrpe-server nagios-plugins nagios-plugins-basic nagios-plugins-standard
nagios3 nagios3-cgi nagios3-common nagios3-core

2. Edit /etc/nagios-plugins/config/nt.cfg

In the File substitute:

define command { command_name check_nt command_line /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_nt -H '$HOSTADDRESS$' -v '$ARG1$' }

With:

define command {
command_name check_nt
command_line /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_nt -H '$HOSTADDRESS$' -p 12489 -v $ARG1$ $ARG2$
}

3. Modify nrpe.cfg to put in allowd hoss to connect to the Nagions nrpe server

vim /etc/nagios/nrpe.cfg

Lookup inside for nagios’s configuration directive:

allowed_hosts=127.0.0.1

In order to allow more hosts to report to the nagios nrpe daemon, change the value to let’s say:

allowed_hosts=127.0.0.1,192.168.1.4,192.168.1.5,192.168.1.6

This config allows the three IPs 192.168.1.4-6 to be able to report for nrpe.

For the changes to nrpe server to take effect, it has to be restrarted.

debian:~# /etc/init.d/nagios-nrpe-server restart

Further on some configurations needs to be properly done on the nrpe agent Windows hosts in this case 192.168.1.4,192.168.1.5,192.168.1.6

4. Install the nsclient++ on all Windows hosts which CPU, Disk, Temperature and services has to be monitored

Download the agent from http://sourceforge.net/projects/nscplus and launch the installer, click twice on it and follow the installation screens. Its necessery that during installation the agent has the NRPE protocol enabled. After the installation is complete one needs to modify the NSC.ini
By default many of nsclient++ tracking modules are not enabled in NSC.ini, thus its necessery that the following DLLs get activated in the conf:

FileLogger.dll
CheckSystem.dll
CheckDisk.dll
NSClientListener.dll
SysTray.dll
CheckEventLog.dll
CheckHelpers.dll

Another requirement is to instruct the nsclient++ angent to have access to the Linux installed nagios server again with adding it to the allowed_hosts config variable:

allowed_hosts=192.168.1.1

In my case the Nagios runs on Debian Lenny (Squeeze) 6 and possess the IP address of 192.168.1.1
To test the intalled windows nsclient++ agents are properly installed a simple telnet connection from the Linux host is enough:

5. Create necessery configuration for the nagios Linux server to include all the Windows hosts which will be monitored

There is a window.cfg template file located in /usr/share/doc/nagios3-common/examples/template-object/windows.cfg on Debian.

The file is a good start point for creating a conf file to be understand by nagios and used to periodically refresh information about the status of the Windows hosts.

Thus it’s a good idea to copy the file to nagios3 config directory:

debian:~# mkdir /etc/nagios3/objects
debian:~# cp -rpf /usr/share/doc/nagios3-common/examples/template-object/windows.cfg /etc/nagios3/objects/windows.cfg

A sample windows.cfg content, (which works for me fine) and monitor a couple of Windows nodes running MS-SQL service and IIS and makes sure the services are up and running are:

define host{
use windows-server ; Inherit default values from a template
host_name Windows1 ; The name we're giving to this host
alias Iready Server ; A longer name associated with the host
address 192.168.1.4 ; IP address of the host
}
define host{
use windows-server ; Inherit default values from a template
host_name Windows2 ; The name we're giving to this host
alias Iready Server ; A longer name associated with the host
address 192.168.1.4 ; IP address of the host
}
define hostgroup{
hostgroup_name windows-servers ; The name of the hostgroup
alias Windows Servers ; Long name of the group
}
define hostgroup{
hostgroup_name IIS
alias IIS Servers
members Windows1,Windows2
}
define hostgroup{
hostgroup_name MSSQL
alias MSSQL Servers
members Windows1,Windows2
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description NSClient++ Version
check_command check_nt!CLIENTVERSION
}
define service{ use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description Uptime
check_command check_nt!UPTIME
}
define service{ use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description CPU Load
check_command check_nt!CPULOAD!-l 5,80,90
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description Memory Usage
check_command check_nt!MEMUSE!-w 80 -c 90
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description C: Drive Space
check_command check_nt!USEDDISKSPACE!-l c -w 80 -c 90
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description W3SVC
check_command check_nt!SERVICESTATE!-d SHOWALL -l W3SVC
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description Explorer
check_command check_nt!PROCSTATE!-d SHOWALL -l Explorer.exe
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description NSClient++ Version
check_command check_nt!CLIENTVERSION
}
define service{ use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description Uptime
check_command check_nt!UPTIME
}
define service{ use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description CPU Load
check_command check_nt!CPULOAD!-l 5,80,90
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description Memory Usage
check_command check_nt!MEMUSE!-w 80 -c 90
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description C: Drive Space
check_command check_nt!USEDDISKSPACE!-l c -w 80 -c 90
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description W3SVC
check_command check_nt!SERVICESTATE!-d SHOWALL -l W3SVC
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description Explorer
check_command check_nt!PROCSTATE!-d SHOWALL -l Explorer.exe
}
define service{ use generic-service
host_name Windows1
service_description SQL port Check
check_command check_tcp!1433
}
define service{
use generic-service
host_name Windows2
service_description SQL port Check
check_command check_tcp!1433
}
The above config, can easily be extended for more hosts, or if necessery easily setup to track more services in nagios web frontend.
6. Test if connectivity to the nsclient++ agent port is available from the Linux server

debian:~# telnet 192.168.58.6 12489
Trying 192.168.58.6...
Connected to 192.168.58.6.
Escape character is '^]'.
asd
ERROR: Invalid password.

Another good idea is to launch on the Windows host the NSClient++ (system tray) , e.g.:

Start, All Programs, NSClient++, Start NSClient++ (system tray).

Test Nagios configuration from the Linux host running nagios and nrpe daemons to check if the check_nt, can succesfully authenticate and retrieve data generated from the nsclient++ on the Windows host:

debian:~# /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_nt -H 192.168.1.5 -p 12489 -v CPULOAD -w 80 -c 90 -l 5,80,90,10,80,90

If everything is okay and the remote Windows system 192.168.1.5 has properly configured and running NSClient++ the above command should return an output like:

CPU Load 1% (5 min average) 1% (10 min average) | '5 min avg Load'=1%;80;90;0;100 '10 min avg Load'=1%;80;90;0;100

In case of the command returns:

could not fetch information from server

instead this means that probably there is some kind of problem with authentication or handshake of the Linux host’s nagios check_nt to the Windows server’s running on 12489.

This is sometimes caused by misconfigured NSC.ini file, however in other occasions this error is caused by misconfigured Windows Firewall or because the NSClient++ is not running with Administrator user.

By the way important note to make about Windows 2008r2 is that if NSClient++ is running there it’s absolutely required to Login with Windows Administrator and run the NSClient++ /start , if it’s run through the Run As Adminsitrator with an admin privileged user the aforementioned error might appear, so be careful.
I’ve experienced this error myself and it took me about 40 minutes to find that I have to run it directly with Administrator user after logging as Administrator.

7. Create nagios web iface Apache configuration

nagios debian pachage is shipped with a config which is suitable to be setdebian:~# cp -rpf /usr/share/doc/nagios3-common/examples/apache2.conf /etc/apache2/sites-avalable/nagios
debian:~# ln -sf /etc/apache2/sites-available/nagios /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/nagios

The /etc/apache2/sites-available/nagios can easily be configured to work on Virtualhost, to do so the above copied file need to be wrapped inside a VirtualHost directive. For that put in the beginning of the file;

<VirtualHost *:80>

and in the end of the file:

<VirtualHost *:80>

8. Restart nagios server and Apache for the new settings to take effect

debian:~# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
...
debian:~# /etc/init.d/nagios3 restart

If some custom configuration about tracking the Debian Linux nagios host running services needs to be made, its also helpful for one to check in /etc/nagios3/conf.d

Well that’s mostly what I had to do to make the Nagios3 server to keep track of a small Windows network on Debian GNU/Linux Squeeze 6, hope this small article helps. Cheers 😉