Posts Tagged ‘requests’

Apache disable requests to not log to access.log Logfile through SetEnvIf and dontlog httpd variables

Monday, October 11th, 2021

apache-disable-certain-strings-from-logging-to-access-log-logo

Logging to Apache access.log is mostly useful as this is a great way to keep log on who visited your website and generate periodic statistics with tools such as Webalizer or Astats to keep track on your visitors and generate various statistics as well as see the number of new visitors as well most visited web pages (the pages which mostly are attracting your web visitors), once the log analysis tool generates its statistics, it can help you understand better which Web spiders visit your website the most (as spiders has a predefined) IP addresses, which can give you insight on various web spider site indexation statistics on Google, Yahoo, Bing etc. . Sometimes however either due to bugs in web spiders algorithms or inconsistencies in your website structure, some of the web pages gets double visited records inside the logs, this could happen for example if your website uses to include iframes.

Having web pages accessed once but logged to be accessed twice hence is erroneous and unwanted, and though that usually have to be fixed by the website programmers, if such approach is not easily doable in the moment and the website is running on critical production system, the double logging of request can be omitted thanks to a small Apache log hack with SetEnvIf Apache config directive. Even if there is no double logging inside Apache log happening it could be that some cron job or automated monitoring scripts or tool such as monit is making periodic requests to Apache and this is garbling your Log Statistics results.

In this short article hence I'll explain how to do remove certain strings to not get logged inside /var/log/httpd/access.log.

1. Check SetEnvIf is Loaded on the Webserver
 

On CentOS / RHEL Linux:

# /sbin/apachectl -M |grep -i setenvif
AH00558: httpd: Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using localhost.localdomain. Set the 'ServerName' directive globally to suppress this message
 setenvif_module (shared)


On Debian / Ubuntu Linux:

/usr/sbin/apache2ctl -M |grep -i setenvif
AH00548: NameVirtualHost has no effect and will be removed in the next release /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default.conf:1
 setenvif_module (shared)


2. Using SetEnvIf to omit certain string to get logged inside apache access.log


SetEnvIf could be used either in some certain domain VirtualHost configuration (if website is configured so), or it can be set as a global Apache rule from the /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf 

To use SetEnvIf  you have to place it inside a <Directory …></Directory> configuration block, if it has to be enabled only for a Certain Apache configured directory, otherwise you have to place it in the global apache config section.

To be able to use SetEnvIf, only in a certain directories and subdirectories via .htaccess, you will have defined in <Directory>

AllowOverride FileInfo


The general syntax to omit a certain Apache repeating string from keep logging with SetEnvIf is as follows:
 

SetEnvIf Request_URI "^/WebSiteStructureDirectory/ACCESS_LOG_STRING_TO_REMOVE$" dontlog


General syntax for SetEnvIf is as follows:

SetEnvIf attribute regex env-variable

SetEnvIf attribute regex [!]env-variable[=value] [[!]env-variable[=value]] …

Below is the overall possible attributes to pass as described in mod_setenvif official documentation.
 

  • Host
  • User-Agent
  • Referer
  • Accept-Language
  • Remote_Host: the hostname (if available) of the client making the request.
  • Remote_Addr: the IP address of the client making the request.
  • Server_Addr: the IP address of the server on which the request was received (only with versions later than 2.0.43).
  • Request_Method: the name of the method being used (GET, POST, etc.).
  • Request_Protocol: the name and version of the protocol with which the request was made (e.g., "HTTP/0.9", "HTTP/1.1", etc.).
  • Request_URI: the resource requested on the HTTP request line – generally the portion of the URL following the scheme and host portion without the query string.

Next locate inside the configuration the line:

CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access.log combined


To enable filtering of included strings, you'll have to append env=!dontlog to the end of line.

 

CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access.log combined env=!dontlog

 

You might be using something as cronolog for log rotation to prevent your WebServer logs to become too big in size and hard to manage, you can append env=!dontlog to it in same way.

If you haven't used cronolog is it is perhaps best to show you the package description.

server:~# apt-cache show cronolog|grep -i description -A10 -B5
Version: 1.6.2+rpk-2
Installed-Size: 63
Maintainer: Debian QA Group <packages@qa.debian.org>
Architecture: amd64
Depends: perl:any, libc6 (>= 2.4)
Description-en: Logfile rotator for web servers
 A simple program that reads log messages from its input and writes
 them to a set of output files, the names of which are constructed
 using template and the current date and time.  The template uses the
 same format specifiers as the Unix date command (which are the same
 as the standard C strftime library function).
 .
 It intended to be used in conjunction with a Web server, such as
 Apache, to split the access log into daily or monthly logs:
 .
   TransferLog "|/usr/bin/cronolog /var/log/apache/%Y/access.%Y.%m.%d.log"
 .
 A cronosplit script is also included, to convert existing
 traditionally-rotated logs into this rotation format.

Description-md5: 4d5734e5e38bc768dcbffccd2547922f
Homepage: http://www.cronolog.org/
Tag: admin::logging, devel::lang:perl, devel::library, implemented-in::c,
 implemented-in::perl, interface::commandline, role::devel-lib,
 role::program, scope::utility, suite::apache, use::organizing,
 works-with::logfile
Section: web
Priority: optional
Filename: pool/main/c/cronolog/cronolog_1.6.2+rpk-2_amd64.deb
Size: 27912
MD5sum: 215a86766cc8d4434cd52432fd4f8fe7

If you're using cronolog to daily rotate the access.log and you need to filter out the strings out of the logs, you might use something like in httpd.conf:

 

CustomLog "|/usr/bin/cronolog –symlink=/var/log/httpd/access.log /var/log/httpd/access.log_%Y_%m_%d" combined env=!dontlog


 

3. Disable Apache logging access.log from certain USERAGENT browser
 

You can do much more with SetEnvIf for example you might want to omit logging requests from a UserAgent (browser) to end up in /dev/null (nowhere), e.g. prevent any Website requests originating from Internet Explorer (MSIE) to not be logged.

SetEnvIf User_Agent "(MSIE)" dontlog

CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access.log combined env=!dontlog


4. Disable Apache logging from requests coming from certain FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) localhost 127.0.0.1 or concrete IP / IPv6 address

SetEnvIf Remote_Host "dns.server.com$" dontlog

CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access.log combined env=!dontlog


Of course for this to work, your website should have a functioning DNS servers and Apache should be configured to be able to resolve remote IPs to back resolve to their respective DNS defined Hostnames.

SetEnvIf recognized also perl PCRE Regular Expressions, if you want to filter out of Apache access log requests incoming from multiple subdomains starting with a certain domain hostname.

 

SetEnvIf Remote_Host "^example" dontlog

– To not log anything coming from localhost.localdomain address ( 127.0.0.1 ) as well as from some concrete IP address :

SetEnvIf Remote_Addr "127\.0\.0\.1" dontlog

SetEnvIf Remote_Addr "192\.168\.1\.180" dontlog

– To disable IPv6 requests that be coming at the log even though you don't happen to use IPv6 at all

SetEnvIf Request_Addr "::1" dontlog

CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access.log combined env=!dontlog


– Note here it is obligatory to escape the dots '.'


5. Disable robots.txt Web Crawlers requests from being logged in access.log

SetEnvIf Request_URI "^/robots\.txt$" dontlog

CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access.log combined env=!dontlog

Using SetEnvIfNoCase to read incoming useragent / Host / file requests case insensitve

The SetEnvIfNoCase is to be used if you want to threat incoming originators strings as case insensitive, this is useful to omit extraordinary regular expression SetEnvIf rules for lower upper case symbols.

SetEnvIFNoCase User-Agent "Slurp/cat" dontlog
SetEnvIFNoCase User-Agent "Ask Jeeves/Teoma" dontlog
SetEnvIFNoCase User-Agent "Googlebot" dontlog
SetEnvIFNoCase User-Agent "bingbot" dontlog
SetEnvIFNoCase Remote_Host "fastsearch.net$" dontlog

Omit from access.log logging some standard web files .css , .js .ico, .gif , .png and Referrals from own domain

Sometimes your own site scripts do refer to stuff on your own domain that just generates junks in the access.log to keep it off.

SetEnvIfNoCase Request_URI "\.(gif)|(jpg)|(png)|(css)|(js)|(ico)|(eot)$" dontlog

 

SetEnvIfNoCase Referer "www\.myowndomain\.com" dontlog

CustomLog /var/log/apache2/access.log combined env=!dontlog

 

6. Disable Apache requests in access.log and error.log completely


Sometimes at rare cases the produced Apache logs and error log is really big and you already have the requests logged in another F5 Load Balancer or Haproxy in front of Apache WebServer or alternatively the logging is not interesting at all as the Web Application served written in ( Perl / Python / Ruby ) does handle the logging itself. 
I've earlier described how this is done in a good amount of details in previous article Disable Apache access.log and error.log logging on Debian Linux and FreeBSD

To disable it you will have to comment out CustomLog or set it to together with ErrorLog to /dev/null in apache2.conf / httpd.conf (depending on the distro)
 

CustomLog /dev/null
ErrorLog /dev/null


7. Restart Apache WebServer to load settings
 

An important to mention is in case you have Webserver with multiple complex configurations and there is a specific log patterns to omit from logs it might be a very good idea to:

a. Create /etc/httpd/conf/dontlog.conf / etc/apache2/dontlog.conf
add inside all your custom dontlog configurations
b. Include dontlog.conf from /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf / /etc/apache2/apache2.conf

Finally to make the changes take affect, of course you will need to restart Apache webserver depending on the distro and if it is with systemd or System V:

For systemd RPM based distro:

systemctl restart httpd

or for Deb based Debian etc.

systemctl apache2 restart

On old System V scripts systems:

On RedHat / CentOS etc. restart Apache with:
 

/etc/init.d/httpd restart


On Deb based SystemV:
 

/etc/init.d/apache2 restart


What we learned ?
 

We have learned about SetEnvIf how it can be used to prevent certain requests strings getting logged into access.log through dontlog, how to completely stop certain browser based on a useragent from logging to the access.log as well as how to omit from logging certain requests incoming from certain IP addresses / IPv6 or FQDNs and how to stop robots.txt from being logged to httpd log.


Finally we have learned how to completely disable Apache logging if logging is handled by other external application.
 

Stop haproxy log requests to /var/log/messages / Disable haproxy double logging

Friday, June 25th, 2021

haproxy-logo

On a CentOS Linux release 7.9.2009 (Core) I've running haproxies on two KVM virtual machines that are configured in a High Avaialability cluster with Corosync and Pacemaker, the machines are inherited from another admin (I did not install the servers hardware) and OS but have been received the system for support.
The old sysadmins seems to not care much about the system so they've left the haprxoy with Double logging one time under separate configured log in /var/log/haproxy/haproxyprod.log and each Haproxy TCP mode flown request has been double logged to /var/log/messages as well. As you can guess this shouldn't be so because we're wasting Hard drive space so to fix that I had to stop haproxy doble logging to /var/log/messages.

The logging is done under a separate local pointer local6 the /etc/haproxy/haproxyprod.cfg goes as follows:
 

[root@haproxy01 ~]# cat /etc/haproxy/haproxyprod.cfg

global
    # log <address> [len ] [max level [min level]]
    log 127.0.0.1 local6 debug

 

The logging is handled by rsyslog via the local6, so obviously to keep out the logging from /var/log/messages
The logging to the separate log file configuration in rsyslog is as follows:

local6.*                                                /var/log/haproxy/haproxyprod.log

It turned to be really easy to prevent haproxy get its requests log to /var/log/messages all I had to change is under /etc/rsyslogd.conf

local6.none config has to be placed for /var/log/messages the full line configuration in /etc/rsyslog.conf that stopped double logging is:

# Don't log private authentication messages!
*.info;mail.none;authpriv.none;cron.none;local5.none;local6.none                /var/log/messages

 

Disable DNS recursion and AXFR requests in BIND on Debian Linux and FreeBSD / How to test a nameserver if AXFR requests are allowed with dig command

Monday, March 15th, 2010

I am playing with bind on a newly configured server and therefore doing my best to configure the nameserver in a good manner. In that manner of thoughts I remembered about the good old “recursion” which could pose a security hole in your DNS systems. I won’t buffle on how bad it is for a BIND domain resolver to have Domain recursion switched on, there is plenty of information you can read further online. Anyways here is a brief overview on recursion:
Recursive DNS is essentially the opposite of Custom DNS. Custom DNS is an authoritative DNS service that allows others to find your domain, and Recursive DNS allows you to resolve other people’s domains.

So considering the above definition if you decide to leave the default behaviour of the Bind nameserver (which by the way is also default behaviour of many other DNS servers including Microsoft DNS), this would mean that your DNS will be left open for the whole world to be able to serve resolve requests for any domain name requested by end users. In other words somebody out there might decide to use your nameserver to resolve all internet domains, like: google.com, yahoo.co.uk etc.

It is wise to enable recursion only for localhost on your bind name server, So to achieve that on Debian:
Open /etc/bind/named.conf.options and insert into it
Right before the options {

acl recurseallow { 1.2.3.4; 127.0.0.1; };

Also in the options {} include the following lines:

allow-recursion { recurseallow; };recursion yes;

On FreeBSD you need to include the same in /var/named/etc/namedb/named.conf by default or any other location if you have some specific named.conf file location.

Another truly Vital things to include in /etc/bind/named.conf.options on Debian Lenny among options {} is:

auth-nxdomain no;

Including this in the options {} configuration block would completely disable AXFR transfer requests on your nameserver on FreeBSD the procedure is absolutely analogous, just open /var/named/etc/namedb/named.conf and include the auth-nxdomain no; in the options configuration block.

To stress out the importance of disable AXFR it’s important to know that if you don’t disable the AXFR which is enabled by default in many nameservers out there you’re risking that a malicious person could list the whole zone files for each and every of the configured domains in the DNS server and consequently the attacker can learn a lot about the DNS topology of your network etc.
So to complete the article I’m gonna give an example on how the dig command can be used in order to check a certain DNS server if it has enabled the AXFR requests (e.g. if it’s vulnerable to this type of DNS information leak).

dig @somenameserver.net somedomainname.net axfr

In the above example somenameserver.net = is a random name server hosting a specific DNS domain
somedomainname.net = is the DNS domain name / (a.k.a. zone file) hosted on somenameserver.net

If everything is configured properly in your the namesever you’re running the axfr test against you should see something like:

; <<>> DiG 9.6.1-P1 <<>> @somenameserver.net somedomainname.net axfr
; (1 server found)
;; global options: +cmd
; Transfer failed.