Posts Tagged ‘SELINUXTYPE’

CentOS disable SELinux permanently or one time on grub Linux kernel boot time

Saturday, July 24th, 2021

selinux-artistic-penguin-logo-protect-data

 

1. Office 365 cloud connected computer and a VirtualBox hosted machine with SELINUX preventing it to boot

At my job we're in process of migrating my old Lenovo Laptop Thinkpad model L560 Laptop to Dell Latitude 5510 wiith Intel Core i5 vPro CPU and 256 Gb SSD Hard Drive.  The new laptops are generally fiine though they're not even a middle class computers and generally I prefer thinkpads. The sad thing out of this is our employee decided to migrate to Office 365 (again perhaps another stupid managerial decision out of an excel sheet wtih a balance to save some money … 

As you can imagine Office 365 is not really PCI Standards compliant and not secure since our data is stored in Microsoft cloud and theoretically Microsoft has and owns our data or could wipe loose the data if they want to. The other obvious security downside I've noticed with the new "Secure PCI complaint laptop" is the initial PC login screen which by default offers fingerprint authentication or the even worse  and even less secure face recognition, but obviosly everyhing becomes more and more crazy and people become less and less cautious for security if that would save money or centralize the data … In the name of security we completely waste security that is very dubious paradox I don't really understand but anyways, enough rant back to the main topic of this article is how to and I had to disable selinux?

As part of Migration I've used Microsoft OneDrive to copy old files from the Thinkpad to the Latitude (as on the old machine USB's are forbidden and I cannot copy over wiith a siimple USB driive, as well as II have no right to open the laptop and copy data from the Hard driive, and even if we had this right without breaking up some crazy company policy that will not be possible as the hard drive data on old laptop is encrypted, the funny thing is that the new laptop data comes encrypted and there is no something out of the box as BitDefender or McAffee incryption (once again, obviously our data security is a victim of some managarial decisions) …
 

2. OneDrive copy problems unable to sync some of the copied files to Onedrive


Anyways as the Old Laptop's security is quite paranoid and we're like Fort Nox, only port 80 and port 443 connections to the internet can be initiated to get around this harsh restrictions it was as simple to use a Virtualbox Virtual Machine. So on old laptop I've installed a CentOS 7 image which I used so far and I used one drive to copy my vbox .vdi image on the new laptop work machine.

The first head buml was the .vdi which seems to be prohibited to be copied to OneDrive, so to work around this I had to rename the origianl CentOS7.vdi to CentOS7.vdi-renamed on old laptop and once the data is in one drive copy my Vitualbox VM/ directory from one drive to the Dell Latitude machine and rename the .vdi-named towards .vdi as well as import it from the latest installed VirtualBox on the new machine.
 

3. Disable SELINUX from initial grub boot


So far so good but as usual happens with miigrations I've struck towards another blocker, the VM image once initiated to boot from Virtualbox badly crashed with some complains that selinux cannot be loaded.
Realizing CentOS 7 has the more or less meaningless Selinux, I've took the opportunity to disable SeLinux.

To do so I've booted the Kernel with Selinux disabled from GRUB2 loader prompt before Kernel and OS Userland boots.

 

 

I thought I need to type the information on the source in grub. What I did is very simple, on the Linux GRUB boot screen I've pressed

'e' keyboard letter

that brought the grub boot loader into edit mode.

Then I had to add selinux=0 on the edited selected kernel version, as shown in below screenshot:

selinux-disable-from-grub.png

Next to boot the Linux VM without Selinux enabled one time,  just had to press together

Ctrl+X then add selinux=0 on the edited selected kernel version, that should be added as shown in the screenshot somewhere after the line of
root=/dev/mapper/….

4. Permanently Disable Selinux on CentOS 7


Once I managed to boot Virtual Machine properly with Oracle Virtualbox, to permanently disabled selinux I had to:

 

Once booted into CentOS, to check the status of selinux run:

 

# sestatus
Copy
SELinux status:                 enabled
SELinuxfs mount:                /sys/fs/selinux
SELinux root directory:         /etc/selinux
Loaded policy name:             targeted
Current mode:                   enforcing
Mode from config file:          enforcing
Policy MLS status:              enabled
Policy deny_unknown status:     allowed
Max kernel policy version:      31

 

5. Disable SELinux one time with setenforce command


You can temporarily change the SELinux mode from targeted to permissive with the following command:

 

# setenforce 0


Next o permanently disable SELinux on your CentOS 7 next time the system boots, Open the /etc/selinux/config file and set the SELINUX mod parameter to disabled.

On CentOS 7 you can  edit the kernel parameters in /etc/default/grub (in the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX= key) and set selinux=0 so on next VM / PC boot we boot with a SELINUX disabled for example add   RUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=selinux=0 to the file then you have to regenerate your Grub config like this:
 

# grub2-mkconfig -o /etc/grub2.cfg
# grub2-mkconfig -o /etc/grub2-efi.cfg


Further on to disable SeLinux on OS level edit /etc/selinux
 

Default /etc/selinux/config with selinux enabled should look like so:

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
#       enforcing – SELinux security policy is enforced.
#       permissive – SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
#       disabled – No SELinux policy is loaded.
SELINUX=enforcing
# SELINUXTYPE= can take one of these two values:
#       targeted – Targeted processes are protected,
#       mls – Multi Level Security protection.
SELINUXTYPE=targeted


To disable SeLinux modify the file to be something like:

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
#       enforcing – SELinux security policy is enforced.
#       permissive – SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
#       disabled – No SELinux policy is loaded.
SELINUX=disabled
# SELINUXTYPE= can take one of these two values:
#       targeted – Targeted processes are protected,
#       mls – Multi Level Security protection.
SELINUXTYPE=targeted

6. Check SELINUX status is disabled

# sestatus

SELinux status:                 disabled

So in this article shottly was explained shortly the fake security adopted by using Microsoft Cloud environment Offiice 365, my faced OneDrive copy issues (which prevented even my old laptop Virtual Machine to boot properly and the handy trick to rename the file that is unwilling to get copied from old PC towards m$ OneDrive as well as the grub trick to disable Selinux permanently from grub2.