Posts Tagged ‘restart apache’

Auto restart Apache on High server load (bash shell script) – Fixing Apache server temporal overload issues

Saturday, March 24th, 2012

auto-restart-apache-on-high-load-bash-shell-script-fixing-apache-temporal-overload-issues

I've written a tiny script to check and restart, Apache if the server encounters, extremely high load avarage like for instance more than (>25). Below is an example of a server reaching a very high load avarage:;

server~:# uptime
13:46:59 up 2 days, 18:54, 1 user, load average: 58.09, 59.08, 60.05
load average: 0.09, 0.08, 0.08

Sometimes high load avarage is not a problem, as the server might have a very powerful hardware. A high load numbers is not always an indicator for a serious problems. Some 16 CPU dual core (2.18 Ghz) machine with 16GB of ram could probably work normally with a high load avarage like in the example. Anyhow as most servers are not so powerful having such a high load avarage, makes the machine hardly do its job routine.

In my specific, case one of our Debian Linux servers is periodically reaching to a very high load level numbers. When this happens the Apache webserver is often incapable to serve its incoming requests and starts lagging for clients. The only work-around is to stop the Apache server for a couple of seconds (10 or 20 seconds) and then start it again once the load avarage has dropped to less than "3".

If this temporary fix is not applied on time, the server load gets increased exponentially until all the server services (ssh, ftp … whatever) stop responding normally to requests and the server completely hangs …

Often this server overloads, are occuring at night time so I'm not logged in on the server and one such unexpected overload makes the server unreachable for hours.
To get around the sudden high periodic load avarage server increase, I've written a tiny bash script to monitor, the server load avarage and initiate an Apache server stop and start with a few seconds delay in between.

#!/bin/sh
# script to check server for extremely high load and restart Apache if the condition is matched
check=`cat /proc/loadavg | sed 's/\./ /' | awk '{print $1}'`
# define max load avarage when script is triggered
max_load='25'
# log file
high_load_log='/var/log/apache_high_load_restart.log';
# location of inidex.php to overwrite with temporary message
index_php_loc='/home/site/www/index.php';
# location to Apache init script
apache_init='/etc/init.d/apache2';
#
site_maintenance_msg="Site Maintenance in progress - We will be back online in a minute";
if [ $check -gt "$max_load" ]; then>
#25 is load average on 5 minutes
cp -rpf $index_php_loc $index_php_loc.bak_ap
echo "$site_maintenance_msg" > $index_php_loc
sleep 15;
if [ $check -gt "$max_load" ]; then
$apache_init stop
sleep 5;
$apache_init restart
echo "$(date) : Apache Restart due to excessive load | $check |" >> $high_load_log;
cp -rpf $index_php_loc.bak_ap $index_php_loc
fi
fi

The idea of the script is partially based on a forum thread – Auto Restart Apache on High Loadhttp://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=971304Here is a link to my restart_apache_on_high_load.sh script

The script is written in a way that it makes two "if" condition check ups, to assure 100% there is a constant high load avarage and not just a temporal 5 seconds load avarage jump. Once the first if is matched, the script first tries to reduce the server load by overwritting a the index.php, index.html script of the website with a one stating the server is ongoing a maintenance operations.
Temporary stopping the index page, often reduces the load in 10 seconds of time, so the second if case is not necessery at all. Sometimes, however this first "if" condition cannot decrease enough the load and the server load continues to stay too high, then the script second if comes to play and makes apache to be completely stopped via Apache init script do 2 secs delay and launch the apache server again.

The script also logs about, the load avarage encountered, while the server was overloaded and Apache webserver was restarted, so later I can check what time the server overload occured.
To make the script periodically run, I've scheduled the script to launch every 5 minutes as a cron job with the following cron:

# restart Apache if load is higher than 25
*/5 * * * * /usr/sbin/restart_apache_on_high_load.sh >/dev/null 2>&1

I have also another system which is running FreeBSD 7_2, which is having the same overload server problems as with the Linux host.
Copying the auto restart apache on high load script on FreeBSD didn't work out of the box. So I rewrote a little chunk of the script to make it running on the FreeBSD host. Hence, if you would like to auto restart Apache or any other service on FreeBSD server get /usr/sbin/restart_apache_on_high_load_freebsd.sh my script and set it on cron on your BSD.

This script is just a temporary work around, however as its obvious that the frequency of the high overload will be rising with time and we will need to buy new server hardware to solve permanently the issues, anyways, until this happens the script does a great job 🙂

I'm aware there is also alternative way to auto restart Apache webserver on high server loads through using monit utility for monitoring services on a Unix system. However as I didn't wanted to bother to run extra services in the background I decided to rather use the up presented script.

Interesting info to know is Apache module mod_overload exists – which can be used for checking load average. Using this module once load avarage is over a certain number apache can stop in its preforked processes current serving request, I've never tested it myself so I don't know how usable it is. As of time of writting it is in early stage version 0.2.2
If someone, have tried it and is happy with it on a busy hosting servers, please share with me if it is stable enough?

Check and Restart Apache if it is malfunctioning (not returning HTML content) shell script

Monday, March 19th, 2012

Check and Restart Apache Webserver on Malfunction, Apache feather logo

One of the company Debian Lenny 5.0 Webservers, where I'm working as sys admin sometimes stops to properly server HTTP requests.
Whenever this oddity happens, the Apache server seems to be running okay but it is not failing to return requested content

I can see the webserver listens on port 80 and establishing connections to remote hosts – the apache processes show normally as I can see in netstat …:

apache:~# netstat -enp 80
Active Internet connections (w/o servers)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State User Inode PID/Program name
tcp 0 0 xxx.xxx.xxx.xx:80 46.253.9.36:5665 SYN_RECV 0 0 -
tcp 0 0 xxx.xxx.xxx.xx:80 78.157.26.24:5933 SYN_RECV 0 0 -
...

Also the apache forked child processes show normally in process list:

apache:~# ps axuwwf|grep -i apache
root 46748 0.0 0.0 112300 872 pts/1 S+ 18:07 0:00 \_ grep -i apache
root 42530 0.0 0.1 217392 6636 ? Ss Mar14 0:39 /usr/sbin/apache2 -k start
www-data 42535 0.0 0.0 147876 1488 ? S Mar14 0:01 \_ /usr/sbin/apache2 -k start
root 28747 0.0 0.1 218180 4792 ? Sl Mar14 0:00 \_ /usr/sbin/apache2 -k start
www-data 31787 0.0 0.1 219156 5832 ? S Mar14 0:00 | \_ /usr/sbin/apache2 -k start

In spite of that, in any client browser to any of the Apache (Virtual hosts) websites, there is no HTML content returned…
This weird problem continues until the Apache webserver is retarted.
Once webserver is restarted everything is back to normal.
I use Apache Check Apache shell script set on few remote hosts to regularly check with nmap if port 80 (www) of my server is open and responding, anyways this script just checks if the open and reachable and thus using it was unable to detect Apache wasn't able to return back HTML content.
To work around the malfunctions I wrote tiny script – retart_apache_if_empty_content_is_returned.sh

The scripts idea is very simple;
A request is made a remote defined host with lynx text browser, then the output of lines is counted, if the output returned by lynx -dump http://someurl.com is less than the number returned whether normally invoked, then the script triggers an apache init script restart.

I've set the script to periodically run in a cron job, every 5 minutes each hour.
# check if apache returns empty content with lynx and if yes restart and log it
*/5 * * * * /usr/sbin/restart_apache_if_empty_content.sh >/dev/null 2>&1

This is not perfect as sometimes still, there will be few minutes downtime, but at least the downside will not be few hours until I am informed ssh to the server and restart Apache manually

A quick way to download and set from cron execution my script every 5 minutes use:

apache:~# cd /usr/sbin
apache:/usr/sbin# wget -q http://www.pc-freak.net/bscscr/restart_apache_if_empty_content.sh
apache:/usr/sbin# chmod +x restart_apache_if_empty_content.sh
apache:/usr/sbin# crontab -l > /tmp/file; echo '*/5 * * * *' /usr/sbin/restart_apache_if_empty_content.sh 2>&1 >/dev/null

 

Tracking graphically MySQL, Apache and Network performance in web with Munin on Debian Linux

Saturday, March 19th, 2011

munin_monitor_cpu_network_hard_drive_apache_mysql_performance-in-web-on-linux_logo

Munin is great software for surveillance software for your MySQL, Apache, Qmail, Postfix and many other of the classical daemon services which most of the Linux, BSD servers online are running on.

1. Munin on Debian Linux is really easy to be installed and comes to executing:

debian:~# apt-get install munin munin-node munin-plugins-extra

2. Link /var/www/munin/ to some VirtualHost or ServerHost
For instance if your munin is to be placed on the domain pc-freak.net.net which has the DocumentRoot of /var/www

debian:~# cd /var/www
debian:/var/www# ln -sf /var/www/munin munin

3. Add some extra MySQL related plugins

To check whole list of pmunin plugins you can enable check in /etc/munin/plugins directory

Lets say our Munin will be providing statistics mainly for MySQL, enable this bunch of plugins:

cd /etc/munin/plugins
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_ mysql_
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_bytes mysql_bytes
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_innodb mysql_innodb
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_isam_space_ mysql_isam_space_
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_queries mysql_queries
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_slowqueries mysql_slowqueries
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_threads mysql_threads


Though above command would enable mysql monitoring it will be not working out of the box. You will find in munin logs error like:

Missing dependency Cache::Cache at /usr/share/munin/plugins/mysql_ line 716."

To fix this install libcache-perl and libcache-cache-perl

apt-get install --yes libcache-perl libcache-cache-perl
 

Then regenerate munin plugin configuration issue cmd:

munin-node-configure --suggest --shell | sh

and restart Munin-node server

service munin-node restart
 

Munin Node should be able login to the MySQL server using the Debian System Maintenance user however if you should need to create a custom user you can add the following configuration to:
 

/etc/munin/plugin-conf.d/munin-node

 

[mysql*]
    user root
    env.mysqluser muninmonitor
    env.mysqlpassword Your-Secret-Password

4. Edit Munin config

Make sure you have at least the following variables enabled in /etc/munin/munin.conf
 

 dbdir  /var/lib/munin
 htmldir /var/cache/munin/www
 logdir /var/log/munin
 rundir  /var/run/munin

 tmpldir    /etc/munin/templates

includedir /etc/munin/munin-conf.d

[localhost.localdomain]
    address 127.0.0.1
    use_node_name yes

 

5. Add Munin Alias or Virtualhost

To make Munin Accessible from Webserver you need to at least add an alias create a file
/etc/apache2/conf.d/munin with following content:

vim /etc/apache2/conf.d/munin

Alias /munin /var/cache/munin/www

<Directory /var/cache/munin/www>
        Order allow,deny
        #Allow from localhost 127.0.0.0/8 ::1
        Allow from all
        Options None
        php_value engine off

    <IfModule mod_expires.c>
        ExpiresActive On
        ExpiresDefault M310
    </IfModule>

</Directory>


If you want to access Munin from Apache subdomain create it lets say you want to access it via stats.pc-freak.net, use following config file:

vi /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/stats.pc-freak.net
 

<VirtualHost *>
   ServerAdmin hipo@pc-freak.net
   ServerName stats.pc-freak.net
   DocumentRoot /var/cache/munin/www
   <Directory />
       Options FollowSymLinks
       #AllowOverride All
       php_value engine off
   </Directory>
   LogLevel debug
   CustomLog /var/log/apache2/munin/access.log combined
   ErrorLog /var/log/apache2/munin/error.log
   ServerSignature On
<Directory /var/cache/munin/www>
        Order allow,deny
        #Allow from localhost 127.0.0.0/8 ::1
        Allow from all
        Options FollowSymlinks
        #AllowOverride All
        php_value engine off

</Directory>

</VirtualHost>

 


6. Restart Apache;

debian:~# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Now to access the newly installed munin point your favorite browser to (either the subdirectory configured for access or the Virtualhost subdomain):

http://www.pc-freak.net/munin/
or
http://munin.pc-freak.net

eth0-network-traffic-munin-server-statistics

connections_through_firewall-statistics-munin-debian-linux
7. Protecting Munin with a password

As it could be a security leak to expose statistics regarding your server (Disk I/O, Memory, Load Avarage, Apache, MySQL Postfix) operations it is good security practice to protect munin with a password.

I've earlied blogged on how to protect your server munin web-statistics wtih an htaccess password (read it here)


munin-cup-statistics-by-day-and-by-month-screenshot

Happy Monitoring