Archive for the ‘System Administration’ Category

How to check if shared library is loaded in AIX OS – Fix missing libreadline.so.7

Thursday, February 20th, 2020

ibm-aix-logo1

I've had to find out whether an externally Linux library is installed  on AIX system and whether something is not using it.
The returned errors was like so:

 

# gpg –export -a

Could not load program gpg:
Dependent module /opt/custom/lib/libreadline.a(libreadline.so.7) could not be loaded.
Member libreadline.so.7 is not found in archive


After a bit of investigation, I found that gpg was failing cause it linked to older version of libreadline.so.6, the workaround was to just substitute the newer version of libreadline.so.7 over the original installed one.

Thus I had a plan to first find out whether this libreadline.a is loaded and recognized by AIX UNIX first and second find out whether some of the running processes is not using that library.
I've come across this interesting IBM official documenation that describes pretty good insights on how to determine whether a shared library  is currently loaded on the system. which mentions the genkld command that is doing
exactly what I needed.

In short:
genkld – creates a list that is printed to the console that shows all loaded shared libraries

genkld-screenshot-aix-unix

Next I used lsof (list open files) command to check whether there is in real time opened libraries by any of the running programs on the system.

After not finding anything and was sure the library is neither loaded as a system library in AIX nor it is used by any of the currently running AIX processes, I was sure I could proceed to safely overwrite libreadline.a (libreadline.so.6) with libreadline.a with (libreadline.so.7).

The result of that is again a normally running gpg as ldd command shows the binary is again normally linked to its dependend system libraries.
 

aix# ldd /usr/bin/gpg
/usr/bin/gpg needs:
         /usr/lib/threads/libc.a(shr.o)
         /usr/lib/libpthreads.a(shr_comm.o)
         /usr/lib/libpthreads.a(shr_xpg5.o)
         /opt/freeware/lib/libintl.a(libintl.so.1)
         /opt/freeware/lib/libreadline.a(libreadline.so.7)
         /opt/freeware/lib/libiconv.a(libiconv.so.2)
         /opt/freeware/lib/libz.a(libz.so.1)
         /opt/freeware/lib/libbz2.a(libbz2.so.1)
         /unix
         /usr/lib/libcrypt.a(shr.o)
         /opt/freeware/lib/libiconv.a(shr4.o)
         /usr/lib/libcurses.a(shr42.o)

 

 

# gpg –version
gpg (GnuPG) 1.4.22
Copyright (C) 2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

 

Home: ~/.gnupg
Supported algorithms:
Pubkey: RSA, RSA-E, RSA-S, ELG-E, DSA
Cipher: IDEA, 3DES, CAST5, BLOWFISH, AES, AES192, AES256, TWOFISH,
        CAMELLIA128, CAMELLIA192, CAMELLIA256
Hash: MD5, SHA1, RIPEMD160, SHA256, SHA384, SHA512, SHA224
Compression: Uncompressed, ZIP, ZLIB, BZIP2

 

 

How to enable HaProxy logging to a separate log /var/log/haproxy.log / prevent HAProxy duplicate messages to appear in /var/log/messages

Wednesday, February 19th, 2020

haproxy-logging-basics-how-to-log-to-separate-file-prevent-duplicate-messages-haproxy-haproxy-weblogo-squares
haproxy  logging can be managed in different form the most straight forward way is to directly use /dev/log either you can configure it to use some log management service as syslog or rsyslogd for that.

If you don't use rsyslog yet to install it: 

# apt install -y rsyslog

Then to activate logging via rsyslogd we can should add either to /etc/rsyslogd.conf or create a separte file and include it via /etc/rsyslogd.conf with following content:
 

Enable haproxy logging from rsyslogd


Log haproxy messages to separate log file you can use some of the usual syslog local0 to local7 locally used descriptors inside the conf (be aware that if you try to use some wrong value like local8, local9 as a logging facility you will get with empty haproxy.log, even though the permissions of /var/log/haproxy.log are readable and owned by haproxy user.

When logging to a local Syslog service, writing to a UNIX socket can be faster than targeting the TCP loopback address. Generally, on Linux systems, a UNIX socket listening for Syslog messages is available at /dev/log because this is where the syslog() function of the GNU C library is sending messages by default. To address UNIX socket in haproxy.cfg use:

log /dev/log local2 


If you want to log into separate log each of multiple running haproxy instances with different haproxy*.cfg add to /etc/rsyslog.conf lines like:

local2.* -/var/log/haproxylog2.log
local3.* -/var/log/haproxylog3.log


One important note to make here is since rsyslogd is used for haproxy logging you need to have enabled in rsyslogd imudp and have a UDP port listener on the machine.

E.g. somewhere in rsyslog.conf or via rsyslog include file from /etc/rsyslog.d/*.conf needs to have defined following lines:

$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerRun 514


I prefer to use external /etc/rsyslog.d/20-haproxy.conf include file that is loaded and enabled rsyslogd via /etc/rsyslog.conf:

# vim /etc/rsyslog.d/20-haproxy.conf

$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerRun 514​
local2.* -/var/log/haproxy2.log


It is also possible to produce different haproxy log output based on the severiy to differentiate between important and less important messages, to do so you'll need to rsyslog.conf something like:
 

# Creating separate log files based on the severity
local0.* /var/log/haproxy-traffic.log
local0.notice /var/log/haproxy-admin.log

 

Prevent Haproxy duplicate messages to appear in /var/log/messages

If you use local2 and some default rsyslog configuration then you will end up with the messages coming from haproxy towards local2 facility producing doubled simultaneous records to both your pre-defined /var/log/haproxy.log and /var/log/messages on Proxy servers that receive few thousands of simultanous connections per second.
This is a problem since doubling the log will produce too much data and on systems with smaller /var/ partition you will quickly run out of space + this haproxy requests logging to /var/log/messages makes the file quite unreadable for normal system events which are so important to track clearly what is happening on the server daily.

To prevent the haproxy duplicate messages you need to define somewhere in rsyslogd usually /etc/rsyslog.conf local2.none near line of facilities configured to log to file:

*.info;mail.none;authpriv.none;cron.none;local2.none     /var/log/messages

This configuration should work but is more rarely used as most people prefer to have haproxy log being written not directly to /dev/log which is used by other services such as syslogd / rsyslogd.

To use /dev/log to output logs from haproxy configuration in global section use config like:
 

global
        log /dev/log local2 debug
        chroot /var/lib/haproxy
        stats socket /run/haproxy/admin.sock mode 660 level admin
        stats timeout 30s
        user haproxy
        group haproxy
        daemon

The log global directive basically says, use the log line that was set in the global section for whole config till end of file. Putting a log global directive into the defaults section is equivalent to putting it into all of the subsequent proxy sections.

Using global logging rules is the most common HAProxy setup, but you can put them directly into a frontend section instead. It can be useful to have a different logging configuration as a one-off. For example, you might want to point to a different target Syslog server, use a different logging facility, or capture different severity levels depending on the use case of the backend application. 

Insetad of using /dev/log interface that is on many distributions heavily used by systemd to store / manage and distribute logs,  many haproxy server sysadmins nowdays prefer to use rsyslogd as a default logging facility that will manage haproxy logs.
Admins prefer to use some kind of mediator service to manage log writting such as rsyslogd or syslog, the reason behind might vary but perhaps most important reason is  by using rsyslogd it is possible to write logs simultaneously locally on disk and also forward logs  to a remote Logging server  running rsyslogd service.

Logging is defined in /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg or the respective configuration through global section but could be also configured to do a separate logging based on each of the defined Frontend Backends or default section. 
A sample exceprt from this section looks something like:

#———————————————————————
# Global settings
#———————————————————————
global
    log         127.0.0.1 local2

    chroot      /var/lib/haproxy
    pidfile     /var/run/haproxy.pid
    maxconn     4000
    user        haproxy
    group       haproxy
    daemon

    # turn on stats unix socket
    stats socket /var/lib/haproxy/stats

#———————————————————————
defaults
    mode                    tcp
    log                     global
    option                  tcplog
    #option                  dontlognull
    #option http-server-close
    #option forwardfor       except 127.0.0.0/8
    option                  redispatch
    retries                 7
    #timeout http-request    10s
    timeout queue           10m
    timeout connect         30s
    timeout client          20m
    timeout server          10m
    #timeout http-keep-alive 10s
    timeout check           30s
    maxconn                 3000

 

 

# HAProxy Monitoring Config
#———————————————————————
listen stats 192.168.0.5:8080                #Haproxy Monitoring run on port 8080
    mode http
    option httplog
    option http-server-close
    stats enable
    stats show-legends
    stats refresh 5s
    stats uri /stats                            #URL for HAProxy monitoring
    stats realm Haproxy\ Statistics
    stats auth hproxyauser:Password___          #User and Password for login to the monitoring dashboard

 

#———————————————————————
# frontend which proxys to the backends
#———————————————————————
frontend ft_DKV_PROD_WLPFO
    mode tcp
    bind 192.168.233.5:30000-31050
    option tcplog
    log-format %ci:%cp\ [%t]\ %ft\ %b/%s\ %Tw/%Tc/%Tt\ %B\ %ts\ %ac/%fc/%bc/%sc/%rc\ %sq/%bq
    default_backend Default_Bakend_Name


#———————————————————————
# round robin balancing between the various backends
#———————————————————————
backend bk_DKV_PROD_WLPFO
    mode tcp
    # (0) Load Balancing Method.
    balance source
    # (4) Peer Sync: a sticky session is a session maintained by persistence
    stick-table type ip size 1m peers hapeers expire 60m
    stick on src
    # (5) Server List
    # (5.1) Backend
    server Backend_Server1 10.10.10.1 check port 18088
    server Backend_Server2 10.10.10.2 check port 18088 backup


The log directive in above config instructs HAProxy to send logs to the Syslog server listening at 127.0.0.1:514. Messages are sent with facility local2, which is one of the standard, user-defined Syslog facilities. It’s also the facility that our rsyslog configuration is expecting. You can add more than one log statement to send output to multiple Syslog servers.

Once rsyslog and haproxy logging is configured as a minumum you need to restart rsyslog (assuming that haproxy config is already properly loaded):

# systemctl restart rsyslogd.service

To make sure rsyslog reloaded successfully:

systemctl status rsyslogd.service


Restarting HAproxy

If the rsyslogd logging to 127.0.0.1 port 514 was recently added a HAProxy restart should also be run, you can do it with:
 

# /usr/sbin/haproxy -f /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg -D -p /var/run/haproxy.pid -sf $(cat /var/run/haproxy.pid)


Or to restart use systemctl script (if haproxy is not used in a cluster with corosync / heartbeat).

# systemctl restart haproxy.service

You can control how much information is logged by adding a Syslog level by

    log         127.0.0.1 local2 info


The accepted values are the standard syslog security level severity:

Value Severity Keyword Deprecated keywords Description Condition
0 Emergency emerg panic System is unusable A panic condition.
1 Alert alert   Action must be taken immediately A condition that should be corrected immediately, such as a corrupted system database.
2 Critical crit   Critical conditions Hard device errors.
3 Error err error Error conditions  
4 Warning warning warn Warning conditions  
5 Notice notice   Normal but significant conditions Conditions that are not error conditions, but that may require special handling.
6 Informational info   Informational messages  
7 Debug debug   Debug-level messages Messages that contain information normally of use only when debugging a program.

 

Logging only errors / timeouts / retries and errors is done with option:

Note that if the rsyslog is configured to listen on different port for some weird reason you should not forget to set the proper listen port, e.g.:
 

  log         127.0.0.1:514 local2 info

option dontlog-normal

in defaults or frontend section.

You most likely want to enable this only during certain times, such as when performing benchmarking tests.

(or log-format-sd for structured-data syslog) directive in your defaults or frontend
 

Haproxy Logging shortly explained


The type of logging you’ll see is determined by the proxy mode that you set within HAProxy. HAProxy can operate either as a Layer 4 (TCP) proxy or as Layer 7 (HTTP) proxy. TCP mode is the default. In this mode, a full-duplex connection is established between clients and servers, and no layer 7 examination will be performed. When in TCP mode, which is set by adding mode tcp, you should also add option tcplog. With this option, the log format defaults to a structure that provides useful information like Layer 4 connection details, timers, byte count and so on.

Below is example of configured logging with some explanations:

Log-format "%ci:%cp [%t] %ft %b/%s %Tw/%Tc/%Tt %B %ts %ac/%fc/%bc/%sc/%rc %sq/%bq"

haproxy-logged-fields-explained
Example of Log-Format configuration as shown above outputted of haproxy config:

Log-format "%ci:%cp [%tr] %ft %b/%s %TR/%Tw/%Tc/%Tr/%Ta %ST %B %CC %CS %tsc %ac/%fc/%bc/%sc/%rc %sq/%bq %hr %hs %{+Q}r"

haproxy_http_log_format-explained1

To understand meaning of this abbreviations you'll have to closely read  haproxy-log-format.txt. More in depth info is to be found in HTTP Log format documentation

 

Logging HTTP request headers

HTTP request header can be logged via:
 

 http-request capture

frontend website
    bind :80
    http-request capture req.hdr(Host) len 10
    http-request capture req.hdr(User-Agent) len 100
    default_backend webservers


The log will show headers between curly braces and separated by pipe symbols. Here you can see the Host and User-Agent headers for a request:

192.168.150.1:57190 [20/Dec/2018:22:20:00.899] website~ webservers/server1 0/0/1/0/1 200 462 – – —- 1/1/0/0/0 0/0 {mywebsite.com|Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Ubuntu Chromium/71.0.3578.80 } "GET / HTTP/1.1"

 

Haproxy Stats Monitoring Web interface


Haproxy is having a simplistic stats interface which if enabled produces some general useful information like in above screenshot, through which
you can get a very basic in browser statistics and track potential issues with the proxied traffic for all configured backends / frontends incoming outgoing
network packets configured nodes
 experienced downtimes etc.

haproxy-statistics-report-picture

The basic configuration to make the stats interface accessible would be like pointed in above config for example to enable network listener on address
 

https://192.168.0.5:8080/stats


with hproxyuser / password config would be:

# HAProxy Monitoring Config
#———————————————————————
listen stats 192.168.0.5:8080                #Haproxy Monitoring run on port 8080
    mode http
    option httplog
    option http-server-close
    stats enable
    stats show-legends
    stats refresh 5s
    stats uri /stats                            #URL for HAProxy monitoring
    stats realm Haproxy\ Statistics
    stats auth hproxyauser:Password___          #User and Password for login to the monitoring dashboard

 

 

Sessions states and disconnect errors on new application setup

Both TCP and HTTP logs include a termination state code that tells you the way in which the TCP or HTTP session ended. It’s a two-character code. The first character reports the first event that caused the session to terminate, while the second reports the TCP or HTTP session state when it was closed.

Here are some essential termination codes to track in for in the log:
 

Here are some termination code examples most commonly to see on TCP connection establishment errors:

Two-character code    Meaning
—    Normal termination on both sides.
cD    The client did not send nor acknowledge any data and eventually timeout client expired.
SC    The server explicitly refused the TCP connection.
PC    The proxy refused to establish a connection to the server because the process’ socket limit was reached while attempting to connect.


To get all non-properly exited codes the easiest way is to just grep for anything that is different from a termination code –, like that:

tail -f /var/log/haproxy.log | grep -v ' — '


This should output in real time every TCP connection that is exiting improperly.

There’s a wide variety of reasons a connection may have been closed. Detailed information about all possible termination codes can be found in the HAProxy documentation.
To get better understanding a very useful reading to haproxy Debug errors with  is in haproxy-logging.txt in that small file are collected all the cryptic error messages codes you might find in your logs when you're first time configuring the Haproxy frontend / backend and the backend application behind.

Another useful analyze tool which can be used to analyze Layer 7 HTTP traffic is halog for more on it just google around.

Procedure Instructions to safe upgrade CentOS / RHEL Linux 7 Core to latest release

Thursday, February 13th, 2020

safe-upgrade-CentOS-and_Redhat_Enterprise_Linux_RHEL-7-to-latest-stable-release

Generally upgrading both RHEL and CentOS can be done straight with yum tool just we're pretty aware and mostly anyone could do the update, but it is good idea to do some
steps in advance to make backup of any old basic files that might help us to debug what is wrong in case if the Operating System fails to boot after the routine Machine OS restart
after the upgrade that is usually a good idea to make sure that machine is still bootable after the upgrade.

This procedure can be shortened or maybe extended depending on the needs of the custom case but the general framework should be useful anyways to someone that's why
I decided to post this.

Before you go lets prepare a small status script which we'll use to report status of  sysctl installed and enabled services as well as the netstat connections state and
configured IP addresses and routing on the system.

The script show_running_services_netstat_ips_route.sh to be used during our different upgrade stages:
 

# script status ###
echo "STARTED: $(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S'):" | tee /root/logs/yumcheckupdate-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out
systemctl list-unit-files –type=service | grep enabled
systemctl | grep ".service" | grep "running"
netstat -tulpn
netstat -r
ip a s
/sbin/route -n
echo "ENDED $(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S'):" | tee /root/logs/yumcheckupdate-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out
####

 

– Save the script in any file like /root/status.sh

– Make the /root/logs directoriy.
 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# mkdir /root/logs
[root@redhat: ~ ]# vim /root/status.sh
[root@redhat: ~ ]# chmod +x /root/status.sh

 

1. Get a dump of CentOS installed version release and grub-mkconfig generated os_probe

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# cat /etc/redhat-release  > /root/logs/redhat-release-vorher-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out
[root@redhat: ~ ]# cat /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober > /root/logs/grub2-efi-vorher-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out

 

2. Clear old versionlock marked RPM packages (if there are such)

 

On servers maintained by multitude of system administrators just like the case is inside a Global Corporations and generally in the corporate world , where people do access the systems via LDAP and more than a single person
has superuser privileges. It is a good prevention measure to use yum package management  functionality to RPM based Linux distributions called  versionlock.
versionlock for those who hear it for a first time is locking the versions of the installed RPM packages so if someone by mistake or on purpose decides to do something like :

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum install packageversion

Having the versionlock set will prevent the updated package to be installed with a different branch package version.

Also it will prevent a playful unknowing person who just wants to upgrade the system without any deep knowledge to be able to
run

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum upgrade

update and leave the system in unbootable state, that will be only revealed during the next system reboot.

If you haven't used versionlock before and you want to use it you can do it with:

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum install yum-plugin-versionlock

To add all the packages for compiling C code and all the interdependend packages, you can do something like:

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum versionlock gcc-*

If you want to clear up the versionlock, once it is in use run:

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  yum versionlock clear
[root@redhat: ~ ]#  yum versionlock list

 

3.  Check RPC enabled / disabled

 

This step is not necessery but it is a good idea to check whether it running on the system, because sometimes after upgrade rpcbind gets automatically started after package upgrade and reboot. 
If we find it running we'll need to stop and mask the service.

 

# check if rpc enabled
[root@redhat: ~ ]# systemctl list-unit-files|grep -i rpc
var-lib-nfs-rpc_pipefs.mount                                      static
auth-rpcgss-module.service                                        static
rpc-gssd.service                                                  static
rpc-rquotad.service                                               disabled
rpc-statd-notify.service                                          static
rpc-statd.service                                                 static
rpcbind.service                                                   disabled
rpcgssd.service                                                   static
rpcidmapd.service                                                 static
rpcbind.socket                                                    disabled
rpc_pipefs.target                                                 static
rpcbind.target                                                    static

[root@redhat: ~ ]# systemctl status rpcbind.service
● rpcbind.service – RPC bind service
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/rpcbind.service; disabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: inactive (dead)

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# systemctl status rpcbind.socket
● rpcbind.socket – RPCbind Server Activation Socket
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/rpcbind.socket; disabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: inactive (dead)
   Listen: /var/run/rpcbind.sock (Stream)
           0.0.0.0:111 (Stream)
           0.0.0.0:111 (Datagram)
           [::]:111 (Stream)
           [::]:111 (Datagram)

 

4. Check any previously existing downloaded / installed RPMs (check yum cache)

 

yum install package-name / yum upgrade keeps downloaded packages via its operations inside its cache directory structures in /var/cache/yum/*.
Hence it is good idea to check what were the previously installed packages and their count.

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# cd /var/cache/yum/x86_64/;
[root@redhat: ~ ]# find . -iname '*.rpm'|wc -l

 

5. List RPM repositories set on the server

 

 [root@redhat: ~ ]# yum repolist
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, versionlock
Repodata is over 2 weeks old. Install yum-cron? Or run: yum makecache fast
Determining fastest mirrors
repo id                                                                                 repo name                                                                                                            status
!atos-ac/7/x86_64                                                                       Atos Repository                                                                                                       3,128
!base/7/x86_64                                                                          CentOS-7 – Base                                                                                                      10,019
!cr/7/x86_64                                                                            CentOS-7 – CR                                                                                                         2,686
!epel/x86_64                                                                            Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux 7 – x86_64                                                                          165
!extras/7/x86_64                                                                        CentOS-7 – Extras                                                                                                       435
!updates/7/x86_64                                                                       CentOS-7 – Updates                                                                                                    2,500

 

This step is mandatory to make sure you're upgrading to latest packages from the right repositories for more concretics check what is inside in confs /etc/yum.repos.d/ ,  /etc/yum.conf 
 

6. Clean up any old rpm yum cache packages

 

This step is again mandatory but a good to follow just to have some more clearness on what packages is our upgrade downloading (not to mix up the old upgrades / installs with our newest one).
For documentation purposes all deleted packages list if such is to be kept under /root/logs/yumclean-install*.out file

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum clean all |tee /root/logs/yumcleanall-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out

 

7. List the upgradeable packages's latest repository provided versions

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum check-update |tee /root/logs/yumcheckupdate-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out

 

Then to be aware how many packages we'll be updating:

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  yum check-update | wc -l

 

8. Apply the actual uplisted RPM packages to be upgraded

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum update |tee /root/logs/yumupdate-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out

 

Again output is logged to /root/logs/yumcheckupate-*.out 

 

9. Monitor downloaded packages count real time

 

To make sure yum upgrade is not in some hanging state and just get some general idea in which state of the upgrade is it e.g. Download / Pre-Update / Install  / Upgrade/ Post-Update etc.
in mean time when yum upgrade is running to monitor,  how many packages has the yum upgrade downloaded from remote RPM set repositories:

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  watch "ls -al /var/cache/yum/x86_64/7Server/…OS-repository…/packages/|wc -l"

 

10. Run status script to get the status again

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# sh /root/status.sh |tee /root/logs/status-before-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out

 

11. Add back versionlock for all RPM packs

 

Set all RPM packages installed on the RHEL / CentOS versionlock for all packages.

 

#==if needed
# yum versionlock \*

 

 

12. Get whether old software configuration is not messed up during the Package upgrade (Lookup the logs for .rpmsave and .rpmnew)

 

During the upgrade old RPM configuration is probably changed and yum did automatically save .rpmsave / .rpmnew saves of it thus it is a good idea to grep the prepared logs for any matches of this 2 strings :
 

[root@redhat: ~ ]#   grep -i ".rpm" /root/logs/yumupdate-server-host-2020-01-20_14-30-41.out
[root@redhat: ~ ]#  grep -i ".rpmsave" /root/logs/yumupdate-server-host-2020-01-20_14-30-41.out
[root@redhat: ~ ]#  grep -i ".rpmnew" /root/logs/yumupdate-server-host-2020-01-20_14-30-41.out


If above commands returns output usually it is fine if there is is .rpmnew output but, if you get grep output of .rpmsave it is a good idea to review the files compare with the original files that were .rpmsaved with the 
substituted config file and atune the differences with the changes manually made for some program functionality.

What are the .rpmsave / .rpmnew files ?
This files are coded files that got triggered by the RPM install / upgrade due to prewritten procedures on time of RPM build.

 

If a file was installed as part of a rpm, it is a config file (i.e. marked with the %config tag), you've edited the file afterwards and you now update the rpm then the new config file (from the newer rpm) will replace your old config file (i.e. become the active file).
The latter will be renamed with the .rpmsave suffix.

If a file was installed as part of a rpm, it is a noreplace-config file (i.e. marked with the %config(noreplace) tag), you've edited the file afterwards and you now update the rpm then your old config file will stay in place (i.e. stay active) and the new config file (from the newer rpm) will be copied to disk with the .rpmnew suffix.
See e.g. this table for all the details. 

In both cases you or some program has edited the config file(s) and that's why you see the .rpmsave / .rpmnew files after the upgrade because rpm will upgrade config files silently and without backup files if the local file is untouched.

After a system upgrade it is a good idea to scan your filesystem for these files and make sure that correct config files are active and maybe merge the new contents from the .rpmnew files into the production files. You can remove the .rpmsave and .rpmnew files when you're done.


If you need to get a list of all .rpmnew .rpmsave files on the server do:

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  find / -print | egrep "rpmnew$|rpmsave$

 

13. Reboot the system 

To check whether on next hang up or power outage the system will boot normally after the upgrade, reboot to test it.

 

you can :

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  reboot

 

either

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  shutdown -r now


or if on newer Linux with systemd in ues below systemctl reboot.target.

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  systemctl start reboot.target

 

14. Get again the system status with our status script after reboot

[root@redhat: ~ ]#  sh /root/status.sh |tee /root/logs/status-after-$(hostname)-$(date '+%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S').out

 

15. Clean up any versionlocks if earlier set

 

[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum versionlock clear
[root@redhat: ~ ]# yum versionlock list

 

16. Check services and logs for problems

 

After the reboot Check closely all running services on system make sure every process / listening ports and services on the system are running fine, just like before the upgrade.
If the sytem had firewall,  check whether firewall rules are not broken, e.g. some NAT is not missing or anything earlier configured to automatically start via /etc/rc.local or some other
custom scripts were run and have done what was expected. 
Go through all the logs in /var/log that are most essential /var/log/boot.log , /var/log/messages … yum.log etc. that could reveal any issues after the boot. In case if running some application server or mail server check /var/log/mail.log or whenever it is configured to log.
If the system runs apache closely check the logs /var/log/httpd/error.log or php_errors.log for any strange errors that occured due to some issues caused by the newer installed packages.
Usually most of the cases all this should be flawless but a multiple check over your work is a stake for good results.
 

Fix eth changing network interface names from new Linux naming scheme ens, eno, em1 to legacy eth0, eth1, eth2 on CentOS Linux

Thursday, January 16th, 2020

Change-systemd-Linux-servers-network-interface-name-ensxx-to-eth0-copy

On CentOS / RHEL 7 / Fedora 19+ and other Linux distributions, the default network eth0, eth1 .. interface naming scheme has been changed and in newer Linux kernels OS-es to names such as – ens3 , eno1, enp5s2, em1 etc.,  well known old scheme for eth* is now considered a legacy.
This new Network card naming in Linux OS is due to changes made in Kernel / modules and udev  rules which resembles how Ethernet ifaces are named on other UNIX like systems.
The weird name is taken depending on the Hardware Network card vendor name and is a standard for years in FreeBSD and Mac OSX, however this was not so over the years,
so for old school sysadmins that's pretty annoying as, we're much used to the eth0 / eth1 / eth2 / eth3 naming standard which brought some clearness on the network card naming.

Also for systems which are upgraded from old Linux OS distro releases to a newer ones, that includes this great new "cool" feature, that fits so well the New age-of computing Cloud craziness.
That behaviour could create a number of problems, especially if the already Production working servers due to failure to bring up some of the network devices after the upgrade or, even if you fix that by editting the /etc/network* / etc/sysconfig/networking/* by hand still there is even more stuff that won't work properly, such as any custom made iptables / ipset firewalls rules, or any kind of custom used third party Shell / Perl scripts that depend on the old-school conventional and (convenient easy to remember!!!) eth0, eth2 etc. naming


For sysadmins who are using some kind of Application Clustering with something like corosync / pacemaker this new fuzzy improvement makes things even worse as having a changed interface name of the card will break the cluster …

 

1. Get list of the LAN Card Server hardware

 

To get a better view on the server installed and recognized LAN Cards use lspci / dmidecode commands:

 lspci |grep -i Ether -A1 -B1
01:00.4 USB controller: Hewlett-Packard Company Integrated Lights-Out Standard Virtual USB Controller (r                                                                                                           ev 03)
02:00.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
02:00.1 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
02:00.2 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
02:00.3 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
03:00.0 RAID bus controller: Hewlett-Packard Company Smart Array Gen9 Controllers (rev 01)
05:00.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
05:00.1 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
05:00.2 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
05:00.3 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries NetXtreme BCM5719 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe (rev                                                                                                            01)
7f:08.0 System peripheral: Intel Corporation Xeon E7 v3/Xeon E5 v3/Core i7 QPI Link 0 (rev 02)

 

lspci reports all attached LAN Cards to server which are plugged in on the Motherbord, since that specific server has a Motherboard integrated LAN Adapters too, we can see this one
via dmidecode.

# dmidecode |grep -i Ether -A 5 -B 5

Handle 0x00C5, DMI type 41, 11 bytes
Onboard Device
        Reference Designation: Embedded LOM 1 Port 3
        Type: Ethernet
        Status: Enabled
        Type Instance: 3
        Bus Address: 0000:XX:00.X

Handle 0x00C6, DMI type 41, 11 bytes
Onboard Device
        Reference Designation: Embedded LOM 1 Port 4
        Type: Ethernet
        Status: Enabled
        Type Instance: 4
        Bus Address: 0000:0X:00.X

Handle 0x00C7, DMI type 41, 11 bytes


       Strings:
                PciRoot(0x0)/Pci(0x2,0x0)/Pci(0x0,0x0)
                NIC.Slot.2.1
                HP Ethernet 1Gb 4-port 331T Adapter – NIC
                Slot 2

Handle 0x00E3, DMI type 203, 34 bytes
OEM-specific Type
        Header and Data:

 

The illustrate the eth0 changing name issue, here is example taken from server on how eth1 interface is named on a new CentOS install:
 

# ip addr show

…..
eno1: [BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP] mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast state UP qlen 1000
link/ether 6c:0b:84:6c:48:1c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
inet 10.10.9.5/24 brd 10.10.9.255 scope global eno1
inet6 2606:b400:c00:48:6e0b:84ff:fe6c:481c/128 scope global dynamic
valid_lft 2326384sec preferred_lft 339184sec
inet6 fe80::6e0b:84ff:fe6c:481c/64 scope link
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

 

 

2. Disable Network Manager on the server


To prevent potential problems for future with randomly changing Network card names order on reboots and other mess,
it is generally a good idea to disable Network Manager.

 

# systemctl disable NetworkManager
rm '/etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/NetworkManager.service'
rm '/etc/systemd/system/dbus-org.freedesktop.NetworkManager.service'
rm '/etc/systemd/system/dbus-org.freedesktop.nm-dispatcher.service'

 

3. Check and correct network configuration if necessery in  /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-*


Either fix the naming across all files ifcfg-* to match eth0 / eth1 / ethXX or even better both change the NAME and DEVICE in files and completely rename the files ifcfg-eno1 to ifcfg-eth1 ..
ifcfg-enoXX to ifcfg-ethXX
 

server:~# cat /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eno1
……
NAME=eth0
DEVICE=eth0
……

 

4. Fix the interface scheme naming through passing a GRUB boot parameter to Kernel

 

a. Create backup of /etc/default/grub
 

cp -rpf /etc/default/grub /etc/default/grub_bak_date +"%Y_%m_%Y"


b. Edit /etc/default/grub

c. Find config parameter GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX

d. Add net.ifnames=0 biosdevname=0 to the line

 

net.ifnames=0 biosdevname=0


After the change the line should look like

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=" crashkernel=auto net.ifnames=0 biosdevname=0 rhgb quiet"

 

e. Regenerate GRUB loader to have included the new config

server:~# grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

f. Reboot the sytem
 

server:~# shutdown -r now

 

5. Fix auto-generated inconvenient naming by modifying udev rules

The Mellanox Ehternet server card vendor's workaround to the ever changing eth names is modify udev rules to be able to have the ordinary eth0 / eth1 / eth2 … Lan card name scheme.
In short this is recommended for Mellanox but should work on any other Lan card device attached on a Linux powered server.
 

# cat /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth1
DEVICE="eth1"
BOOTPROTO="static"
HWADDR="7c:fe:90:cb:76:02"
IPADDR=10.10.9.2
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
ONBOOT="yes"

 

# cat /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth2
DEVICE="eth1"
BOOTPROTO="static"
HWADDR="7c:fe:90:cb:76:02"
IPADDR=10.10.99.99
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
ONBOOT="yes"

 

# vi /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules

SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", DRIVERS=="?*", ATTR{address}=="7c:fe:90:cb:76:02", ATTR{dev_id}=="0x0", ATTR{type}=="1", KERNEL=="eth*", NAME="eth1"

SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", DRIVERS=="?*", ATTR{address}=="7c:fe:90:cb:76:03", ATTR{dev_id}=="0x0", ATTR{type}=="1", KERNEL=="eth*", NAME="eth2"

 

Next step is to reboot.
 

# /sbin/reboot


After a while when the server boots check with ip or ifconfig the configuration to make sure the ethXX ordering is proper again.

interface-list-eth1-eth2-screenshot

# /sbin/ifconfig eth1
eth1: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
inet 10.0.99.99 netmask 255.255.255.0 broadcast 10.10.9.255
inet6 fe80::7efe:90ff:fecb:7602 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x20<link>
ether 7c:fe:90:cb:76:02 txqueuelen 1000 (Ethernet)
RX packets 0 bytes 0 (0.0 B)
RX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 frame 0
TX packets 23 bytes 3208 (3.1 KiB)
TX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 carrier 0 collisions 0
eth2: flags=4099<UP,BROADCAST,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
ether 7c:fe:90:cb:76:03 txqueuelen 1000 (Ethernet)
RX packets 0 bytes 0 (0.0 B)
RX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 frame 0
TX packets 0 bytes 0 (0.0 B)
TX errors 0 dropped 0 overruns 0 carrier 0 collisions 0

On some Linux distributions, if it happens this udev extra configuration is not venerated, use net.ifnames=0 biosdevname=0 grub configuration.

6. Verify eth interfaces are present    

# ip addr show

…..

eth0: [BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP] mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast state UP qlen 1000

link/ether 6c:0b:84:6c:48:1c brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

inet 10.10.9.5/24 brd 10.10.9.255 scope global eno1

inet6 2606:b400:c00:48:6e0b:84ff:fe6c:481c/128 scope global dynamic

valid_lft 2326384sec preferred_lft 339184sec

inet6 fe80::6e0b:84ff:fe6c:481c/64 scope link

valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

That's all this should put an end to the annoying auto generated naming lan device naming.

 

Summary

 

So what was explained up was how to resolve problems caused by autogenerated ethernet interface cards by a new functionality in the Linux kernel, so Network cards are again visible via ip address show / ifconfig again in a proper order eth0 / eth1 / eth2 / eth3 etc. instead of a vendor generated cryptic names as ens / eno / em etc. This is possible via either by editing udev rules or grub configuration. Doing so saves nerves and makes sysadmin life better, at least it did mine.
That's all this should put an end to the annoying auto generated naming.
 

How to debug failing service in systemctl and add a new IP network alias in CentOS Linux

Wednesday, January 15th, 2020

linux-debug-failing-systemctl-systemd-service--add-new-IP-alias-network-cable

If you get some error with some service that is start / stopped via systemctl you might be pondering how to debug further why the service is not up then then you'll be in the situation I was today.
While on one configured server with 8 eth0 configured ethernet network interfaces the network service was reporting errors, when atempted to restart the RedHat way via:
 

service network restart


to further debug what the issue was as it was necessery I had to find a way how to debug systemctl so here is how:

 

How to do a verbose messages status for sysctlct?

 

linux:~# systemctl status network

linux:~# systemctl status network

 

Another useful hint is to print out only log messages for the current boot, you can that with:

# journalctl -u service-name.service -b

 

if you don't want to have the less command like page separation ( paging ) use the –no-pager argument.

 

# journalctl -u network –no-pager

Jan 08 17:09:14 lppsq002a network[8515]: Bringing up interface eth5:  [  OK  ]

    Jan 08 17:09:15 lppsq002a network[8515]: Bringing up interface eth6:  [  OK  ]
    Jan 08 17:09:15 lppsq002a network[8515]: Bringing up interface eth7:  [  OK  ]
    Jan 08 17:09:15 lppsq002a systemd[1]: network.service: control process exited, code=exited status=1
    Jan 08 17:09:15 lppsq002a systemd[1]: Failed to start LSB: Bring up/down networking.
    Jan 08 17:09:15 lppsq002a systemd[1]: Unit network.service entered failed state.
    Jan 08 17:09:15 lppsq002a systemd[1]: network.service failed.
    Jan 15 11:04:45 lppsq002a systemd[1]: Starting LSB: Bring up/down networking…
    Jan 15 11:04:45 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up loopback interface:  [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:04:45 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth0:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:45 lppsq002a network[55905]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:04:45 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth1:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:45 lppsq002a network[55905]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth2:  ERROR     : [/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifup-eth] Device eth2 has different MAC address than expected, ignoring.
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: [FAILED]
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth3:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth4:  ERROR     : [/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifup-eth] Device eth4 does not seem to be present, delaying initialization.
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: [FAILED]
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth5:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:04:46 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth6:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: Bringing up interface eth7:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a network[55905]: RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a systemd[1]: network.service: control process exited, code=exited status=1
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a systemd[1]: Failed to start LSB: Bring up/down networking.
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a systemd[1]: Unit network.service entered failed state.
    Jan 15 11:04:47 lppsq002a systemd[1]: network.service failed.
    Jan 15 11:08:22 lppsq002a systemd[1]: Starting LSB: Bring up/down networking…
    Jan 15 11:08:22 lppsq002a network[56841]: Bringing up loopback interface:  [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:08:22 lppsq002a network[56841]: Bringing up interface eth0:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:08:22 lppsq002a network[56841]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:08:26 lppsq002a network[56841]: Bringing up interface eth1:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:08:26 lppsq002a network[56841]: [  OK  ]
    Jan 15 11:08:26 lppsq002a network[56841]: Bringing up interface eth2:  ERROR     : [/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifup-eth] Device eth2 has different MAC address than expected, ignoring.
    Jan 15 11:08:26 lppsq002a network[56841]: [FAILED]
    Jan 15 11:08:26 lppsq002a network[56841]: Bringing up interface eth3:  RTNETLINK answers: File exists
    Jan 15 11:08:27 lppsq002a network[56841]: [  OK  ]


2020-01-15-15_42_11-root-server

 

Another useful thing debug arguments is the -xe to do:

# journalctl -xe –no-pager

 

  • -x (– catalog)
    Augment log lines with explanation texts from the message catalog.
    This will add explanatory help texts to log messages in the output
    where this is available.
  •  -e ( –pager-end )  Immediately jump to the end of the journal inside the implied pager
      tool.

2020-01-15-15_42_32-root-server

Finally after fixing the /etc/sysconfig/networking-scripts/* IP configuration issues I had all the 8 Ethernet interfaces to work as expected
 

# systemctl status network


2020-01-15-16_15_38-root-server

 

 

2. Adding a new IP alias to eth0 interface


Further on I had  to add an IP Alias on the CenOS via its networking configuration, this is done by editing /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg* files.
To create an IP alias for first lan interface eth0, I've had to created a new file named ifcfg-eth0:0
 

linux:~# cd /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/
linux:~# vim ifcfg-eth0:0


with below content

NAME="eth0:0"
ONBOOT="yes"
BOOTPROTO="none"
IPADDR="10.50.10.5"
NETMASK="255.255.255.0"


Adding this IP address network alias works across all RPM based distributions and should work also on Fedora and Open SuSE as well as Suse Enterprise Linux.
If you however prefer to use a text GUI and do it the CentOS server administration way you can use nmtui (Text User Interface for controlling NetworkManager). tool.
 

linux:~# nmtui

 

centos7_nmtui-ncurses-network-configuration-sysadmin-tool

nmtui_add_alias_interface-screenshot

ipmitool: Reset and manage IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface) / ILO (Integrated Lights Out) remote board on Linux servers

Friday, December 20th, 2019

ipmitool-how-to-get-information-about-hardware-and-reset-ipmi-bmc-linux-access-ipmi-ilo-interface-logo

As a system administration nomatter whether you manage a bunch of server in a own brew and run Data Center location with some Rack mounted Hardware like PowerEdge M600 / ProLiant DL360e G8 / ProLiant DL360 Gen9 (755258-B21) or you're managing a bunch of Dedicated Servers, you're or will be faced  at some point to use the embedded in many Rack mountable rack servers IPMI / ILO interface remote console board management. If IPMI / ILO terms are new for you I suggest you quickly read my earlier article What is IPMI / IPKVM / ILO /  DRAC Remote Management interfaces to server .

hp-proliant-bl460c-ILO-Interface-screenshot

HP Proliant BL460 C IPMI (ILO) Web management interface 

In short Remote Management Interface is a way that gives you access to the server just like if you had a Monitor and a Keyboard plugged in directly to server.
When a remote computer is down the sysadmin can access it through IPMI and utilize a text console to the boot screen.
The IPMI protocol specification is led by Intel and was first published on September 16, 1998. and currently is supported by more than 200 computer system vendors, such as Cisco, Dell, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Intel, NEC Corporation, SuperMicro and Tyan and is a standard for remote board management for servers.

IPMI-Block-Diagram-how-ipmi-works-and-its-relation-to-BMC
As you can see from diagram Baseboard Management Controllers (BMCs) is like the heart of IPMI.

Having this ILO / IPMI access is usually via a Web Interface Java interface that gives you the console and usually many of the machines also have an IP address via which a normal SSH command prompt is available giving you ability to execute diagnostic commands to the ILO on the status of attached hardware components of the server / get information about the attached system sensors to get report about things such as:

  • The System Overall heat
  • CPU heat temperature
  • System fan rotation speed cycles
  • Extract information about the server chassis
  • Query info about various system peripherals
  • Configure BIOS or UEFI on a remote system with no monitor / keyboard attached

Having a IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface) firmware embedded into the server Motherboard is essential for system administration because besides this goodies it allows you to remotely Install Operating System to a server without any pre-installed OS right after it is bought and mounted to the planned Data Center Rack nest, just like if you have a plugged Monitor / Keyboard and Mouse and being physically in the remote location.

IPMI is mega useful for system administration also in case of Linux / Windows system updates that requires reboot in which essential System Libraries or binaries are updated and a System reboot is required, because often after system Large bundle updates or Release updates the system fails to boot and you need a way to run a diagnostic stuff from a System rescue Operating System living on a plugged in via a USB stick or CD Drive.
As prior said IPMI remote board is usually accessed and used via some Remote HTTPS encrypted web interface or via Secure Shell crypted session but sometimes the Web server behind the IPMI Web Interface is hanging especially when multiple sysadmins try to access it or due to other stuff and at times due to strange stuff even console SSH access might not be there, thansfully those who run a GNU / Linux Operating system on the Hardware node can use ipmitool tool http://ipmitool.sourceforge.net/ written for Linux that is capable to do a number of useful things with the IPMI management board including a Cold Reset of it so it turns back to working state / adding users / grasping the System hardware and components information health status, changing the Listener address of the IPMI access Interface and even having ability to update the IPMI version firmware.

Prior to be able to access IPMI remotely it has to be enabled usually via a UTP cable connected to the Network from which you expect it to be accesible. The location of the IPMI port on different server vendors is different.

ibm-power9-server-ipmi

IBM Power 9 Server IPMI port

HP-ILO-Bladeserver-Management-port-MGMT-yellow-cabled

HP IPMI console called ILO (Integrated Lights-Out) Port cabled with yellow cable (usually labelled as
Management Port MGMT)

Supermicro-SSG-5029P-E1CTR12L-Rear-Annotated-dedicated-IPMI-lan-port

Supermicro server IPMI Dedicated Lan Port

 

 In this article I'll shortly explain how IPMITool is available and can be installed and used across GNU / Linux Debian / Ubuntu and other deb based Linuxes with apt or on Fedora / CentOS (RPM) based with yum etc.

 

1. Install IPMITool

 

– On Debian

 

# apt-get install –yes ipmitool 

 

– On CentOS

 

# yum install ipmitool OpenIPMI-tools

 

# ipmitool -V
ipmitool version 1.8.14

 

On CentOS ipmitool can run as a service and collect data and do some nice stuff to run it:

 

[root@linux ~]# chkconfig ipmi on 

 

[root@linux ~]# service ipmi start

 

Before start using it is worthy to give here short description from ipmitool man page
 

DESCRIPTION
       This program lets you manage Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) functions of either the local system, via a kernel device driver, or a remote system, using IPMI v1.5 and IPMI v2.0.
       These functions include printing FRU information, LAN configuration, sensor readings, and remote chassis power control.

IPMI management of a local system interface requires a compatible IPMI kernel driver to be installed and configured.  On Linux this driver is called OpenIPMI and it is included in standard  dis‐
       tributions.   On Solaris this driver is called BMC and is included in Solaris 10.  Management of a remote station requires the IPMI-over-LAN interface to be enabled and configured.  Depending on
       the particular requirements of each system it may be possible to enable the LAN interface using ipmitool over the system interface.

 

2. Get ADMIN IP configured for access

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-jojgWqj7acg/Wo6bSP0Av1I/AAAAAAAAGdI/xaHewnmAujkprCiDXoBxV7uHonPFjtZDwCLcBGAs/s1600/22-02-2018%2B15-31-09

To get a list of what is the current listener IP with no access to above Web frontend via which IPMI can be accessed (if it is cabled to the Access / Admin LAN port).

 

# ipmitool lan print 1
Set in Progress         : Set Complete
Auth Type Support       : NONE MD2 MD5 PASSWORD
Auth Type Enable        : Callback : MD2 MD5 PASSWORD
                        : User     : MD2 MD5 PASSWORD
                        : Operator : MD2 MD5 PASSWORD
                        : Admin    : MD2 MD5 PASSWORD
                        : OEM      :
IP Address Source       : Static Address
IP Address              : 10.253.41.127
Subnet Mask             : 255.255.254.0
MAC Address             : 0c:c4:7a:4b:1f:70
SNMP Community String   : public
IP Header               : TTL=0x00 Flags=0x00 Precedence=0x00 TOS=0x00
BMC ARP Control         : ARP Responses Enabled, Gratuitous ARP Disabled
Default Gateway IP      : 10.253.41.254
Default Gateway MAC     : 00:00:0c:07:ac:7b
Backup Gateway IP       : 10.253.41.254
Backup Gateway MAC      : 00:00:00:00:00:00
802.1q VLAN ID          : 8
802.1q VLAN Priority    : 0
RMCP+ Cipher Suites     : 1,2,3,6,7,8,11,12
Cipher Suite Priv Max   : aaaaXXaaaXXaaXX
                        :     X=Cipher Suite Unused
                        :     c=CALLBACK
                        :     u=USER
                        :     o=OPERATOR
                        :     a=ADMIN
                        :     O=OEM

 

 

3. Configure custom access IP and gateway for IPMI

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 ipsrc static

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 ipaddr 192.168.1.211
Setting LAN IP Address to 192.168.1.211

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 netmask 255.255.255.0
Setting LAN Subnet Mask to 255.255.255.0

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 defgw ipaddr 192.168.1.254
Setting LAN Default Gateway IP to 192.168.1.254

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 defgw macaddr 00:0e:0c:aa:8e:13
Setting LAN Default Gateway MAC to 00:0e:0c:aa:8e:13

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 arp respond on
Enabling BMC-generated ARP responses

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 auth ADMIN MD5

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool lan set 1 access on

 

4. Getting a list of IPMI existing users

 

# ipmitool user list 1
ID  Name             Callin  Link Auth  IPMI Msg   Channel Priv Limit
2   admin1           false   false      true       ADMINISTRATOR
3   ovh_dontchange   true    false      true       ADMINISTRATOR
4   ro_dontchange    true    true       true       USER
6                    true    true       true       NO ACCESS
7                    true    true       true       NO ACCESS
8                    true    true       true       NO ACCESS
9                    true    true       true       NO ACCESS
10                   true    true       true       NO ACCESS


– To get summary of existing users

# ipmitool user summary
Maximum IDs         : 10
Enabled User Count  : 4
Fixed Name Count    : 2

5. Create new Admin username into IPMI board
 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool user set name 2 Your-New-Username

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool user set password 2
Password for user 2: 
Password for user 2: 

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool channel setaccess 1 2 link=on ipmi=on callin=on privilege=4

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool user enable 2
[root@linux ~]# 

 

6. Configure non-privilege user into IPMI board

If a user should only be used for querying sensor data, a custom privilege level can be setup for that. This user then has no rights for activating or deactivating the server, for example. A user named monitor will be created for this in the following example:

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool user set name 3 monitor

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool user set password 3
Password for user 3: 
Password for user 3: 

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool channel setaccess 1 3 link=on ipmi=on callin=on privilege=2

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool user enable 3

The importance of the various privilege numbers will be displayed when ipmitool channel is called without any additional parameters.

 

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool channel
Channel Commands: authcap   <channel number> <max privilege>
                  getaccess <channel number> [user id]
                  setaccess <channel number> <user id> [callin=on|off] [ipmi=on|off] [link=on|off] [privilege=level]
                  info      [channel number]
                  getciphers <ipmi | sol> [channel]

 

Possible privilege levels are:
   1   Callback level
   2   User level
   3   Operator level
   4   Administrator level
   5   OEM Proprietary level
  15   No access
[root@linux ~]# 

The user just created (named 'monitor') has been assigned the USER privilege level. So that LAN access is allowed for this user, you must activate MD5 authentication for LAN access for this user group (USER privilege level).

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool channel getaccess 1 3
Maximum User IDs     : 15
Enabled User IDs     : 2

User ID              : 3
User Name            : monitor
Fixed Name           : No
Access Available     : call-in / callback
Link Authentication  : enabled
IPMI Messaging       : enabled
Privilege Level      : USER

[root@linux ~]# 

 

7. Check server firmware version on a server via IPMI

 

# ipmitool mc info
Device ID                 : 32
Device Revision           : 1
Firmware Revision         : 3.31
IPMI Version              : 2.0
Manufacturer ID           : 10876
Manufacturer Name         : Supermicro
Product ID                : 1579 (0x062b)
Product Name              : Unknown (0x62B)
Device Available          : yes
Provides Device SDRs      : no
Additional Device Support :
    Sensor Device
    SDR Repository Device
    SEL Device
    FRU Inventory Device
    IPMB Event Receiver
    IPMB Event Generator
    Chassis Device


ipmitool mc info is actually an alias for the ipmitool bmc info cmd.

8. Reset IPMI management controller or BMC if hanged

 

As earlier said if for some reason Web GUI access or SSH to IPMI is lost, reset with:

root@linux:/root#  ipmitool mc reset
[ warm | cold ]

 

If you want to stop electricity for a second to IPMI and bring it on use the cold reset (this usually
should be done if warm reset does not work).

 

root@linux:/root# ipmitool mc reset cold

 

otherwise soft / warm is with:

 

ipmitool mc reset warm

 

Sometimes the BMC component of IPMI hangs and only fix to restore access to server Remote board is to reset also BMC

 

root@linux:/root# ipmitool bmc reset cold

 

9. Print hardware system event log

 

root@linux:/root# ipmitool sel info
SEL Information
Version          : 1.5 (v1.5, v2 compliant)
Entries          : 0
Free Space       : 10240 bytes
Percent Used     : 0%
Last Add Time    : Not Available
Last Del Time    : 07/02/2015 17:22:34
Overflow         : false
Supported Cmds   : 'Reserve' 'Get Alloc Info'
# of Alloc Units : 512
Alloc Unit Size  : 20
# Free Units     : 512
Largest Free Blk : 512
Max Record Size  : 20

 

 ipmitool sel list
SEL has no entries

In this particular case the system shows no entres as it was run on a tiny Microtik 1U machine, however usually on most Dell PowerEdge / HP Proliant / Lenovo System X machines this will return plenty of messages.

ipmitool sel elist

ipmitool sel clear

To clear anything if such logged

ipmitool sel clear

 

10.  Print Field Replaceable Units ( FRUs ) on the server 

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool fru print
 

 

FRU Device Description : Builtin FRU Device (ID 0)
 Chassis Type          : Other
 Chassis Serial        : KD5V59B
 Chassis Extra         : c3903ebb6237363698cdbae3e991bbed
 Board Mfg Date        : Mon Sep 24 02:00:00 2012
 Board Mfg             : IBM
 Board Product         : System Board
 Board Serial          : XXXXXXXXXXX
 Board Part Number     : 00J6528
 Board Extra           : 00W2671
 Board Extra           : 1400
 Board Extra           : 0000
 Board Extra           : 5000
 Board Extra           : 10

 Product Manufacturer  : IBM
 Product Name          : System x3650 M4
 Product Part Number   : 1955B2G
 Product Serial        : KD7V59K
 Product Asset Tag     :

FRU Device Description : Power Supply 1 (ID 1)
 Board Mfg Date        : Mon Jan  1 01:00:00 1996
 Board Mfg             : ACBE
 Board Product         : IBM Designed Device
 Board Serial          : YK151127R1RN
 Board Part Number     : ZZZZZZZ
 Board Extra           : ZZZZZZ<FF><FF><FF><FF><FF>
 Board Extra           : 0200
 Board Extra           : 00
 Board Extra           : 0080
 Board Extra           : 1

FRU Device Description : Power Supply 2 (ID 2)
 Board Mfg Date        : Mon Jan  1 01:00:00 1996
 Board Mfg             : ACBE
 Board Product         : IBM Designed Device
 Board Serial          : YK131127M1LE
 Board Part Number     : ZZZZZ
 Board Extra           : ZZZZZ<FF><FF><FF><FF><FF>
 Board Extra           : 0200
 Board Extra           : 00
 Board Extra           : 0080
 Board Extra           : 1

FRU Device Description : DASD Backplane 1 (ID 3)
….

 

Worthy to mention here is some cheaper server vendors such as Trendmicro might show no data here (no idea whether this is a protocol incompitability or IPMItool issue).

 

11. Get output about system sensors Temperature / Fan / Power Supply

 

Most newer servers have sensors to track temperature / voltage / fanspeed peripherals temp overall system temp etc.
To get a full list of sensors statistics from IPMI 
 

# ipmitool sensor
CPU Temp         | 29.000     | degrees C  | ok    | 0.000     | 0.000     | 0.000     | 95.000    | 98.000    | 100.000
System Temp      | 40.000     | degrees C  | ok    | -9.000    | -7.000    | -5.000    | 80.000    | 85.000    | 90.000
Peripheral Temp  | 41.000     | degrees C  | ok    | -9.000    | -7.000    | -5.000    | 80.000    | 85.000    | 90.000
PCH Temp         | 56.000     | degrees C  | ok    | -11.000   | -8.000    | -5.000    | 90.000    | 95.000    | 100.000
FAN 1            | na         |            | na    | na        | na        | na        | na        | na        | na
FAN 2            | na         |            | na    | na        | na        | na        | na        | na        | na
FAN 3            | na         |            | na    | na        | na        | na        | na        | na        | na
FAN 4            | na         |            | na    | na        | na        | na        | na        | na        | na
FAN A            | na         |            | na    | na        | na        | na        | na        | na        | na
Vcore            | 0.824      | Volts      | ok    | 0.480     | 0.512     | 0.544     | 1.488     | 1.520     | 1.552
3.3VCC           | 3.296      | Volts      | ok    | 2.816     | 2.880     | 2.944     | 3.584     | 3.648     | 3.712
12V              | 12.137     | Volts      | ok    | 10.494    | 10.600    | 10.706    | 13.091    | 13.197    | 13.303
VDIMM            | 1.496      | Volts      | ok    | 1.152     | 1.216     | 1.280     | 1.760     | 1.776     | 1.792
5VCC             | 4.992      | Volts      | ok    | 4.096     | 4.320     | 4.576     | 5.344     | 5.600     | 5.632
CPU VTT          | 1.008      | Volts      | ok    | 0.872     | 0.896     | 0.920     | 1.344     | 1.368     | 1.392
VBAT             | 3.200      | Volts      | ok    | 2.816     | 2.880     | 2.944     | 3.584     | 3.648     | 3.712
VSB              | 3.328      | Volts      | ok    | 2.816     | 2.880     | 2.944     | 3.584     | 3.648     | 3.712
AVCC             | 3.312      | Volts      | ok    | 2.816     | 2.880     | 2.944     | 3.584     | 3.648     | 3.712
Chassis Intru    | 0x1        | discrete   | 0x0100| na        | na        | na        | na        | na        | na

 

To get only partial sensors data from the SDR (Sensor Data Repositry) entries and readings

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool sdr list 

Planar 3.3V      | 3.31 Volts        | ok
Planar 5V        | 5.06 Volts        | ok
Planar 12V       | 12.26 Volts       | ok
Planar VBAT      | 3.14 Volts        | ok
Avg Power        | 80 Watts          | ok
PCH Temp         | 45 degrees C      | ok
Ambient Temp     | 19 degrees C      | ok
PCI Riser 1 Temp | 25 degrees C      | ok
PCI Riser 2 Temp | no reading        | ns
Mezz Card Temp   | no reading        | ns
Fan 1A Tach      | 3071 RPM          | ok
Fan 1B Tach      | 2592 RPM          | ok
Fan 2A Tach      | 3145 RPM          | ok
Fan 2B Tach      | 2624 RPM          | ok
Fan 3A Tach      | 3108 RPM          | ok
Fan 3B Tach      | 2592 RPM          | ok
Fan 4A Tach      | no reading        | ns
Fan 4B Tach      | no reading        | ns
CPU1 VR Temp     | 27 degrees C      | ok
CPU2 VR Temp     | 27 degrees C      | ok
DIMM AB VR Temp  | 24 degrees C      | ok
DIMM CD VR Temp  | 23 degrees C      | ok
DIMM EF VR Temp  | 25 degrees C      | ok
DIMM GH VR Temp  | 24 degrees C      | ok
Host Power       | 0x00              | ok
IPMI Watchdog    | 0x00              | ok

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool sdr type Temperature
PCH Temp         | 31h | ok  | 45.1 | 45 degrees C
Ambient Temp     | 32h | ok  | 12.1 | 19 degrees C
PCI Riser 1 Temp | 3Ah | ok  | 16.1 | 25 degrees C
PCI Riser 2 Temp | 3Bh | ns  | 16.2 | No Reading
Mezz Card Temp   | 3Ch | ns  | 44.1 | No Reading
CPU1 VR Temp     | F7h | ok  | 20.1 | 27 degrees C
CPU2 VR Temp     | F8h | ok  | 20.2 | 27 degrees C
DIMM AB VR Temp  | F9h | ok  | 20.3 | 25 degrees C
DIMM CD VR Temp  | FAh | ok  | 20.4 | 23 degrees C
DIMM EF VR Temp  | FBh | ok  | 20.5 | 26 degrees C
DIMM GH VR Temp  | FCh | ok  | 20.6 | 24 degrees C
Ambient Status   | 8Eh | ok  | 12.1 |
CPU 1 OverTemp   | A0h | ok  |  3.1 | Transition to OK
CPU 2 OverTemp   | A1h | ok  |  3.2 | Transition to OK

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool sdr type Fan
Fan 1A Tach      | 40h | ok  | 29.1 | 3034 RPM
Fan 1B Tach      | 41h | ok  | 29.1 | 2592 RPM
Fan 2A Tach      | 42h | ok  | 29.2 | 3145 RPM
Fan 2B Tach      | 43h | ok  | 29.2 | 2624 RPM
Fan 3A Tach      | 44h | ok  | 29.3 | 3108 RPM
Fan 3B Tach      | 45h | ok  | 29.3 | 2592 RPM
Fan 4A Tach      | 46h | ns  | 29.4 | No Reading
Fan 4B Tach      | 47h | ns  | 29.4 | No Reading
PS 1 Fan Fault   | 73h | ok  | 10.1 | Transition to OK
PS 2 Fan Fault   | 74h | ok  | 10.2 | Transition to OK

 

[root@linux ~]# ipmitool sdr type ‘Power Supply’
Sensor Type "‘Power" not found.
Sensor Types:
        Temperature               (0x01)   Voltage                   (0x02)
        Current                   (0x03)   Fan                       (0x04)
        Physical Security         (0x05)   Platform Security         (0x06)
        Processor                 (0x07)   Power Supply              (0x08)
        Power Unit                (0x09)   Cooling Device            (0x0a)
        Other                     (0x0b)   Memory                    (0x0c)
        Drive Slot / Bay          (0x0d)   POST Memory Resize        (0x0e)
        System Firmwares          (0x0f)   Event Logging Disabled    (0x10)
        Watchdog1                 (0x11)   System Event              (0x12)
        Critical Interrupt        (0x13)   Button                    (0x14)
        Module / Board            (0x15)   Microcontroller           (0x16)
        Add-in Card               (0x17)   Chassis                   (0x18)
        Chip Set                  (0x19)   Other FRU                 (0x1a)
        Cable / Interconnect      (0x1b)   Terminator                (0x1c)
        System Boot Initiated     (0x1d)   Boot Error                (0x1e)
        OS Boot                   (0x1f)   OS Critical Stop          (0x20)
        Slot / Connector          (0x21)   System ACPI Power State   (0x22)
        Watchdog2                 (0x23)   Platform Alert            (0x24)
        Entity Presence           (0x25)   Monitor ASIC              (0x26)
        LAN                       (0x27)   Management Subsys Health  (0x28)
        Battery                   (0x29)   Session Audit             (0x2a)
        Version Change            (0x2b)   FRU State                 (0x2c)

 

12. Using System Chassis to initiate power on / off / reset / soft shutdown

 

!!!!!  Beware only run this if you know what you're realling doing don't just paste into a production system, If you do so it is your responsibility !!!!! 

–  do a soft-shutdown via acpi 

 

ipmitool [chassis] power soft

 

– issue a hard power off, wait 1s, power on 

 

ipmitool [chassis] power cycle

 

– run a hard power off

 

ipmitool [chassis] power off

 
– do a hard power on 

 

ipmitool [chassis] power on

 

–  issue a hard reset

 

ipmitool [chassis] power reset


– Get system power status
 

ipmitool chassis power status

 

13. Use IPMI (SoL) Serial over Lan to execute commands remotely


Besides using ipmitool locally on server that had its IPMI / ILO / DRAC console disabled it could be used also to query and make server do stuff remotely.

If not loaded you will have to load lanplus kernel module.
 

modprobe lanplus

 

 ipmitool -I lanplus -H 192.168.99.1 -U user -P pass chassis power status

ipmitool -I lanplus -H 192.168.98.1 -U user -P pass chassis power status

ipmitool -I lanplus -H 192.168.98.1 -U user -P pass chassis power reset

ipmitool -I lanplus -H 192.168.98.1 -U user -P pass chassis power reset

ipmitool -I lanplus -H 192.168.98.1 -U user -P pass password sol activate

– Deactivating Sol server capabilities
 

 ipmitool -I lanplus -H 192.168.99.1 -U user -P pass sol deactivate

 

14. Modify boot device order on next boot

 

!!!!! Do not run this except you want to really modify Boot device order, carelessly copy pasting could leave your server unbootable on next boot !!!!!

– Set first boot device to be as BIOS

ipmitool chassis bootdev bios

 

– Set first boot device to be CD Drive

ipmitool chassis bootdev cdrom 

 

– Set first boot device to be via Network Boot PXE protocol

ipmitool chassis bootdev pxe 

 

15. Using ipmitool shell

 

root@iqtestfb:~# ipmitool shell
ipmitool> 
help
Commands:
        raw           Send a RAW IPMI request and print response
        i2c           Send an I2C Master Write-Read command and print response
        spd           Print SPD info from remote I2C device
        lan           Configure LAN Channels
        chassis       Get chassis status and set power state
        power         Shortcut to chassis power commands
        event         Send pre-defined events to MC
        mc            Management Controller status and global enables
        sdr           Print Sensor Data Repository entries and readings
        sensor        Print detailed sensor information
        fru           Print built-in FRU and scan SDR for FRU locators
        gendev        Read/Write Device associated with Generic Device locators sdr
        sel           Print System Event Log (SEL)
        pef           Configure Platform Event Filtering (PEF)
        sol           Configure and connect IPMIv2.0 Serial-over-LAN
        tsol          Configure and connect with Tyan IPMIv1.5 Serial-over-LAN
        isol          Configure IPMIv1.5 Serial-over-LAN
        user          Configure Management Controller users
        channel       Configure Management Controller channels
        session       Print session information
        dcmi          Data Center Management Interface
        sunoem        OEM Commands for Sun servers
        kontronoem    OEM Commands for Kontron devices
        picmg         Run a PICMG/ATCA extended cmd
        fwum          Update IPMC using Kontron OEM Firmware Update Manager
        firewall      Configure Firmware Firewall
        delloem       OEM Commands for Dell systems
        shell         Launch interactive IPMI shell
        exec          Run list of commands from file
        set           Set runtime variable for shell and exec
        hpm           Update HPM components using PICMG HPM.1 file
        ekanalyzer    run FRU-Ekeying analyzer using FRU files
        ime           Update Intel Manageability Engine Firmware
ipmitool>

 

16. Changing BMC / DRAC time setting

 

# ipmitool -H XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX -U root -P pass sel time set "01/21/2011 16:20:44"

 

17. Loading script of IPMI commands

# ipmitool exec /path-to-script/script-with-instructions.txt  

 

Closure

As you saw ipmitool can be used to do plenty of cool things both locally or remotely on a server that had IPMI server interface available. The tool is mega useful in case if ILO console gets hanged as it can be used to reset it.
I explained shortly what is Intelligent Platform Management Interface, how it can be accessed and used on Linux via ipmitool. I went through some of its basic use, how it can be used to print the configured ILO access IP how
this Admin IP and Network configuration can be changed, how to print the IPMI existing users and how to add new Admin and non-privileged users.
Then I've shown how a system hardware and firmware could be shown, how IPMI management BMC could be reset in case if it hanging and how hardware system even logs can be printed (useful in case of hardware failure errors etc.), how to print reports on current system fan / power supply  and temperature. Finally explained how server chassis could be used for soft and cold server reboots locally or via SoL (Serial Over Lan) and how boot order of system could be modified.

ipmitool is a great tool to further automate different sysadmin tasks with shell scrpts for stuff such as tracking servers for a failing hardware and auto-reboot of inacessible failed servers to guarantee Higher Level of availability.
Hope you enjoyed artcle .. It wll be interested to hear of any other known ipmitool scripts or use, if you know such please share it.

Rsync copy files with root privileges between servers with root superuser account disabled

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019

 

rsync-copy-files-between-two-servers-with-root-privileges-with-root-superuser-account-disabled

Sometimes on servers that follow high security standards in companies following PCI Security (Payment Card Data Security) standards it is necessery to have a very weird configurations on servers,to be able to do trivial things such as syncing files between servers with root privileges in a weird manners.This is the case for example if due to security policies you have disabled root user logins via ssh server and you still need to synchronize files in directories such as lets say /etc , /usr/local/etc/ /var/ with root:root user and group belongings.

Disabling root user logins in sshd is controlled by a variable in /etc/ssh/sshd_config that on most default Linux OS
installations is switched on, e.g. 

grep -i permitrootlogin /etc/ssh/sshd_config
PermitRootLogin yes


Many corporations use Vulnerability Scanners such as Qualys are always having in their list of remote server scan for SSH Port 22 to turn have the PermitRootLogin stopped with:

 

PermitRootLogin no


In this article, I'll explain a scenario where we have synchronization between 2 or more servers Server A / Server B, whatever number of servers that have already turned off this value, but still need to
synchronize traditionally owned and allowed to write directories only by root superuser, here is 4 easy steps to acheive it.

 

1. Add rsyncuser to Source Server (Server A) and Destination (Server B)


a. Execute on Src Host:

 

groupadd rsyncuser
useradd -g 1000 -c 'Rsync user to sync files as root src_host' -d /home/rsyncuser -m rsyncuser

 

b. Execute on Dst Host:

 

groupadd rsyncuser
useradd -g 1000 -c 'Rsync user to sync files dst_host' -d /home/rsyncuser -m rsyncuser

 

2. Generate RSA SSH Key pair to be used for passwordless authentication


a. On Src Host
 

su – rsyncuser

ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096

 

b. Check .ssh/ generated key pairs and make sure the directory content look like.

 

[rsyncuser@src-host .ssh]$ cd ~/.ssh/;  ls -1

id_rsa
id_rsa.pub
known_hosts


 

3. Copy id_rsa.pub to Destination host server under authorized_keys

 

scp ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub  rsyncuser@dst-host:~/.ssh/authorized_keys

 

Next fix permissions of authorized_keys file for rsyncuser as anyone who have access to that file (that exists as a user account) on the system
could steal the key and use it to run rsync commands and overwrite remotely files, like overwrite /etc/passwd /etc/shadow files with his custom crafted credentials
and hence hack you 🙂
 

Hence, On Destionation Host Server B fix permissions with:
 

su – rsyncuser; chmod 0600 ~/.ssh/authorized_keys
[rsyncuser@dst-host ~]$

 

For improved security here to restrict rsyncuser to be able to run only specific command such as very specific script instead of being able to run any command it is good to use little known command= option
once creating the authorized_keys

 

4. Test ssh passwordless authentication works correctly


For that Run as a normal ssh from rsyncuser

On Src Host

 

[rsyncuser@src-host ~]$ ssh rsyncuser@dst-host


Perhaps here is time that for those who, think enabling a passwordless authentication is not enough secure and prefer to authorize rsyncuser via a password red from a secured file take a look in my prior article how to login to remote server with password provided from command line as a script argument / Running same commands on many servers 

5. Enable rsync in sudoers to be able to execute as root superuser (copy files as root)

 


For this step you will need to have sudo package installed on the Linux server.

Then, Execute once logged in as root on Destionation Server (Server B)

 

[root@dst-host ~]# grep 'rsyncuser ALL' /etc/sudoers|wc -l || echo ‘rsyncuser ALL=NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/rsync’ >> /etc/sudoers
 

 

Note that using rsync with a ALL=NOPASSWD in /etc/sudoers could pose a high security risk for the system as anyone authorized to run as rsyncuser is able to overwrite and
respectivle nullify important files on Destionation Host Server B and hence easily mess the system, even shell script bugs could produce a mess, thus perhaps a better solution to the problem
to copy files with root privileges with the root account disabled is to rsync as normal user somewhere on Dst_host and use some kind of additional script running on Dst_host via lets say cron job and
will copy gently files on selective basis.

Perhaps, even a better solution would be if instead of granting ALL=NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/rsync in /etc/sudoers is to do ALL=NOPASSWD:/usr/local/bin/some_copy_script.sh
that will get triggered, once the files are copied with a regular rsyncuser acct.

 

6. Test rsync passwordless authentication copy with superuser works


Do some simple copy, lets say copy files on Encrypted tunnel configurations located under some directory in /etc/stunnel on Server A to /etc/stunnel on Server B

The general command to test is like so:
 

rsync -aPz -e 'ssh' '–rsync-path=sudo rsync' /var/log rsyncuser@$dst_host:/root/tmp/


This will copy /var/log files to /root/tmp, you will get a success messages for the copy and the files will be at destination folder if succesful.

 

On Src_Host run:

 

[rsyncuser@src-host ~]$ dst=FQDN-DST-HOST; user=rsyncuser; src_dir=/etc/stunnel; dst_dir=/root/tmp;  rsync -aP -e 'ssh' '–rsync-path=sudo rsync' $src_dir  $rsyncuser@$dst:$dst_dir;

 

7. Copying files with root credentials via script


The simlest file to use to copy a bunch of predefined files  is best to be handled by some shell script, the most simple version of it, could look something like this.
 

#!/bin/bash
# On server1 use something like this
# On server2 dst server
# add in /etc/sudoers
# rsyncuser ALL=NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/rsync

user='rsyncuser';

dst_dir="/root/tmp";
dst_host='$dst_host';
src[1]="/etc/hosts.deny";
src[2]="/etc/sysctl.conf";
src[3]="/etc/samhainrc";
src[4]="/etc/pki/tls/";
src[5]="/usr/local/bin/";

 

for i in $(echo ${src[@]}); do
rsync -aPvz –delete –dry-run -e 'ssh' '–rsync-path=sudo rsync' "$i" $rsyncuser@$dst_host:$dst_dir"$i";
done


In above script as you can see, we define a bunch of files that will be copied in bash array and then run a loop to take each of them and copy to testination dir.
A very sample version of the script rsync_with_superuser-while-root_account_prohibited.sh 
 

Conclusion


Lets do short overview on what we have done here. First Created rsyncuser on SRC Server A and DST Server B, set up the key pair on both copied the keys to make passwordless login possible,
set-up rsync to be able to write as root on Dst_Host / testing all the setup and pinpointing a small script that can be used as a backbone to develop something more complex
to sync backups or keep system configurations identicatial – for example if you have doubts that some user might by mistake change a config etc.
In short it was pointed the security downsides of using rsync NOPASSWD via /etc/sudoers and few ideas given that could be used to work on if you target even higher
PCI standards.

 

Fix FTP active connection issues “Cannot create a data connection: No route to host” on ProFTPD Linux dedicated server

Tuesday, October 1st, 2019

proftpd-linux-logo

Earlier I've blogged about an encounter problem that prevented Active mode FTP connections on CentOS
As I'm working for a client building a brand new dedicated server purchased from Contabo Dedi Host provider on a freshly installed Debian 10 GNU / Linux, I've had to configure a new FTP server, since some time I prefer to use Proftpd instead of VSFTPD because in my opinion it is more lightweight and hence better choice for a small UNIX server setups. During this once again I've encounted the same ACTIVE FTP not working from FTP server to FTP client host machine. But before shortly explaining, the fix I find worthy to explain briefly what is ACTIVE / PASSIVE FTP connection.

 

1. What is ACTIVE / PASSIVE FTP connection?
 

Whether in active mode, the client specifies which client-side port the data channel has been opened and the server starts the connection. Or in other words the default FTP client communication for historical reasons is in ACTIVE MODE. E.g.
Client once connected to Server tells the server to open extra port or ports locally via which the overall FTP data transfer will be occuring. In the early days of networking when FTP protocol was developed security was not of such a big concern and usually Networks did not have firewalls at all and the FTP DATA transfer host machine was running just a single FTP-server and nothing more in this, early days when FTP was not even used over the Internet and FTP DATA transfers happened on local networks, this was not a problem at all.

In passive mode, the server decides which server-side port the client should connect to. Then the client starts the connection to the specified port.

But with the ever increasing complexity of Internet / Networks and the ever tightening firewalls due to viruses and worms that are trying to own and exploit networks creating unnecessery bulk loads this has changed …

active-passive-ftp-explained-diagram
 

2. Installing and configure ProFTPD server Public ServerName

I've installed the server with the common cmd:

 

apt –yes install proftpd

 

And the only configuration changed in default configuration file /etc/proftpd/proftpd.conf  was
ServerName          "Debian"

I do this in new FTP setups for the logical reason to prevent the multiple FTP Vulnerability Scan script kiddie Crawlers to know the exact OS version of the server, so this was changed to:

 

ServerName "MyServerHostname"

 

Though this is the bad security through obscurity practice doing so is a good practice.
 

3. Create iptable firewall rules to allow ACTIVE FTP mode


But anyways, next step was to configure the firewall to be allowed to communicate on TCP PORT 21 and 20 to incoming source ports range 1024:65535 (to enable ACTIVE FTP) on firewal level with iptables on INPUT and OUTPUT chain rules, like this:

 

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp –sport 1024:65535 -d 0/0 –dport 21 -m state –state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -s 0/0 –sport 1024:65535 -d 0/0 –dport 20 -m state –state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp -s 0/0 –sport 21 -d 0/0 –dport 1024:65535 -m state –state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp -s 0/0 –sport 20 -d 0/0 –dport 1024:65535 -m state –state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT


Talking about Active and Passive FTP connections perhaps for novice Linux users it might be worthy to say few words on Active and Passive FTP connections

Once firewall has enabled FTP Active / Passive connections is on and FTP server is listening, to test all is properly configured check iptable rules and FTP listener:
 

/sbin/iptables -L INPUT |grep ftp
ACCEPT     tcp  —  anywhere             anywhere             tcp spts:1024:65535 dpt:ftp state NEW,ESTABLISHED
ACCEPT     tcp  —  anywhere             anywhere             tcp spts:1024:65535 dpt:ftp-data state NEW,ESTABLISHED
ACCEPT     tcp  —  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:ftp
ACCEPT     tcp  —  anywhere             anywhere             tcp dpt:ftp-data

netstat -l | grep "ftp"
tcp6       0      0 [::]:ftp                [::]:*                  LISTEN    

 

4. Loading nf_nat_ftp module and net.netfilter.nf_conntrack_helper (for backward compitability)


Next step of course was to add the necessery modules nf_nat_ftp nf_conntrack_sane that makes FTP to properly forward ports with respective Firewall states on any of above source ports which are usually allowed by firewalls, note that the range of ports given 1024:65535 might be too much liberal for paranoid sysadmins and in many cases if ports are not filtered, if you are a security freak you can use some smaller range such as 60000-65535.

 

Here is time to say for sysadmins who haven't recently had a task to configure a new (unecrypted) File Transfer Server as today Secure FTP is almost alltime used for file transfers for the sake of security might be puzzled to find out the old Linux kernel ip_conntrack_ftp which was the standard module used to make FTP Active connections work is substituted nowadays with  nf_nat_ftp and nf_conntrack_sane.

To make the 2 modules permanently loaded on next boot on Debian Linux they have to be added to /etc/modules

Here is how sample /etc/modules that loads the modules on next system boot looks like

cat /etc/modules
# /etc/modules: kernel modules to load at boot time.
#
# This file contains the names of kernel modules that should be loaded
# at boot time, one per line. Lines beginning with "#" are ignored.
softdog
nf_nat_ftp
nf_conntrack_sane


Next to say is that in newer Linux kernels 3.x / 4.x / 5.x the nf_nat_ftp and nf_conntrack-sane behaviour changed so  simply loading the modules would not work and if you do the stupidity to test it with some FTP client (I used gFTP / ncftp from my Linux desktop ) you are about to get FTP No route to host errors like:

 

Cannot create a data connection: No route to host

 

cannot-create-a-data-connection-no-route-to-host-linux-error-howto-fix


Sometimes, instead of No route to host error the error FTP client might return is:

 

227 entering passive mode FTP connect connection timed out error


To make the nf_nat_ftp module on newer Linux kernels hence you have to enable backwards compatibility Kernel variable

 

 

/proc/sys/net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_helper

 

echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/netfilter/nf_conntrack_helper

 

To make it permanent if you have enabled /etc/rc.local legacy one single file boot place as I do on servers – for how to enable rc.local on newer Linuxes check here

or alternatively add it to load via sysctl

sysctl -w net.netfilter.nf_conntrack_helper=1

And to make change permanent (e.g. be loaded on next boot)

echo 'net.netfilter.nf_conntrack_helper=1' >> /etc/sysctl.conf

 

5. Enable PassivePorts in ProFTPD or PassivePortRange in PureFTPD


Last but not least open /etc/proftpd/proftpd.conf find PassivePorts config value (commented by default) and besides it add the following line:

 

PassivePorts 60000 65534

 

Just for information if instead of ProFTPd you experience the error on PureFTPD the configuration value to set in /etc/pure-ftpd.conf is:
 

PassivePortRange 30000 35000


That's all folks, give the ncftp / lftp / filezilla or whatever FTP client you prefer and test it the FTP client should be able to talk as expected to remote server in ACTIVE FTP mode (and the auto passive mode) will be not triggered anymore, nor you will get a strange errors and failure to connect in FTP clients as gftp.

Cheers 🙂

Getting Console and Graphical hardware system information on Linux with cpuinfo, neofetch, CPU-X (CPU-Z Unix alternative), I-nex and inxi

Tuesday, September 17th, 2019

getting-console-information-and-graphical-hardware-system-information-Linux-cpuinfo-neofetch-cpu-x-i-nex-1

Earlier I've wrote extensive article on how to get hardware information on Linux using tools such as dmidecode, hardinfo, lshw, hwinfo, x86info and biosdecode but there are few other hardware reporting tools for Linux worthy to mention that has been there for historical reasons such as cpuinfo as we as some new shiny ones such as neofetch (a terminal / console hardware report tool as well the CPU-X and I-Nex  which is Linux equivalent to the all known almost standard for Windows hardware detection CPU-Z worthy to say few words about.
 

1. cpuinfo

 

Perhaps the most basic tool to give you a brief information about your Processor type (model) number of Cores and Logical Processors is cpuinfo

I remember cpuinfo has been there since the very beginning on almost all Linux distributions's repository, nowadays its popularity of the days when the kings on the Linux OS server scenes were Slackware, Caldera OpenLinux and Redhat 6.0 Linux and Debian 3.0  declined but still for scripting purposes it is handy small proggie.

To install and run it in Debian  / Ubuntu / Mint Linux etc.:

 

aptitude install -y cpuinfo

/usr/bin/cpu-info

 

Linux-get-processor-system-info-in-console-cpu-info

 

2. neofetch

 

The next one worthy to install and check is neofetch (a cross-platform and easy-to-use system information
 command line script that collects your Linux system information and display it on the terminal next to an image, it could be your distributions logo or any ascii art of your choice.)

The cool thing about neofetch is besides being able to identify the System server / desktop hardware parameters, it gives some basic info about number of packages installed on the system, memory free and in use, used kernel and exact type of System (be it Dell PowerEdge Model XX, IBM eSeries Model / HP Proliant Model etc.

neofetch-OS-hardware-information-Linux-ascii-system-info-desktop-notebook

neofetch info generated on my home used Lenovo Thikpad T420

neofetch-OS-hardware-information-Linux-ascii-system-info-pcfreak-home-server
neofetch info from pc-freak.net running current machine

neofetch even supports Mac OS X and Windows OS ! 🙂

To install neofetch on Mac OS X:
 

/usr/bin/ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)"


or via Mac ported packages using brew

brew install neofetch


neofetch-screenshot-from-Mac-OS-X

neofetch is even installable on Windows OS that has the scoop command line installer tool installer manager with below PowerShell code in cmd.exe (Command line):

powershell Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned -scope CurrentUser
iex (new-object net.webclient).downloadstring('https://get.scoop.sh')
scoop install git
scoop install neofetch

neofetch-microsoft-windows-hardware-command-line-report-tool-screenshot


By the way Scoop was quite a finding for me and it is pretty handy to install plenty of useful command line Linux / UNIX tools, such as curl, wget, git etc. in the same easy straight forward way as a standard yum or apt-get on Windows (without explicitly installing things as GnuWin and CygWin).
 

3. CPU-X graphical user interface hardware report Linux GUI alternative to Windows CPU-Z


The packages for CPU-X are a bit outdated and even though there are rpm packages for Fedora, OpenSuSE and .deb package for Debian for Debian, Ubuntu and ArchLinux (pacman), there is no up to date version for Debian 10 and the package builds distributed for different Linux distros are a bit outdated.

Thus to install CPU-X on any Linux distribution it is perhaps best to use the portable version (static binary) of CPU-X.
It is currently available on https://github.com/X0rg/CPU-X/releases

To install latest portable version of CPU-X

wget https://github.com/X0rg/CPU-X/releases/download/v3.2.4/CPU-X_v3.2.4_portable.tar.gz

mkdir CPU-X
cd CPU-X

tar -zxvvf CPU-X_v3.2.4_portable.tar.gz
-rwxr-xr-x yohan/users 4563032 2019-01-13 22:15 CPU-X_v3.2.4_portable.bsd64
-rwxr-xr-x yohan/users 5484968 2019-01-13 22:15 CPU-X_v3.2.4_portable.linux64

 

cp -rpf CPU-X_v3.2.4_portable.linux64 /usr/local/bin/
ln -sf /usr/local/bin/CPU-X_v3.2.4_portable.linux64 /usr/local/bin/cpu-x


Next run as superuser (root)
 

hipo@jeremiah:~$ su -c 'cpu-x'

 

As seen from below screenshots cpu-x reports a lot of concrete specific hardware data on:

  • Processor
  • Motherboard
  • Memory
  • System
  • Graphic card
  • Performance

cpu-x-cpu-cpu-z-alternative-linux-screenshot-CPU-info

cpu-x-cpu-cpu-z-alternative-linux-screenshot-caches-info

cpu-x-cpu-cpu-z-alternative-linux-screenshot-Motherboard-info

cpu-x-cpu-cpu-z-alternative-linux-screenshot-memory-info

cpu-x-cpu-cpu-z-alternative-linux-screenshot-system-info

cpu-x-cpu-cpu-z-alternative-linux-screenshot-graphics-info

CPU-X can be installed also on FreeBSD very easily by just installing from BSD port tree sysutils/cpu-x/
It is also said to work on other *BSDs, NetBSD, OpenBSD Unixes but I guess this will require a manual compilation based on FreeBSD's port Makefile.

4. I-Nex another GUI alternative to CPU-Z for UNIX / Linux

I-Nex is even more useful for general hardware reporting as it reports many hardware specifications not reported by CPU-X such as Battery type and Model Name  (if the hardware report is on a laptop), info on USB devices slots or plugged USB devices brand and specifications, the available Network devices on the system (MAC Addresses) of each of it, Installed and used drivers on Hard Disk (ATA / SATA / SCSI / SSD), HW Sector size, Logical Block size, HDD Sectors count and other specific Hard Drive data as well as information on available Audio (Sound Blaster) devices (HDA-Intel), used Codecs, loaded kernel ALSA driver, Video card used and most importantly indicators on Processor reported CPU (temperature).

 

To install I-nex

Go to https://launchpad.net/i-nex or any of the mirror links where it resides and install the respective package, in my case, I was doing the installation on Debian Linux, so fetched current latest amd64 package which as of moment of writting this article is i-nex_7.6.0-0-bzr977-20161012-ubuntu16.10.1_amd64.deb , next installed it with dpkg
 

dpkg -i i-nex_7.6.0-0-bzr977-20161012-ubuntu16.10.1_amd64.deb

 

As the package was depending on some other .deb packages, which failed to install to install the missing ones I had to further run
 

apt –fix-broken install

i-nex-cpu-info-linux-hardware-info-program

 

hre

I-Nex thermal indicators about CPU temperature on a Linux Desktop notebook

i-nex-gpu-info-linux-hardware-info-program

i-nex-mobo-info-linux-hardware-info-program

i-nex-audio-info-linux-hardware-info-program

i-nex-drivers-info-linux-hardware-info-program

i-nex-system-info-linux-hardware-info-program

i-nex-battery-info-linux-hardware-info-program

 

There are other Hardware identification report tools such as CUDA-Z that are useful to check if you have Nvidia Video Card hardware Installed on the PC to check the status of CUDA enabled GPUs, useful if working with nVidia Geforce, Quadro, Tesla cards and ION chipsets.

If you use it however be aware that CUDA-Z is not compatible with 3rd-party linux drivers for NVidia so make sure you have the current official Nvidia version.

 

5. Inxi full featured system information script

 

Inxi is a 10000 lines mega bash script that fetches hardware details from multiple different sources in /proc /sys and from commands on the system, and generates a beautiful looking console report that non technical users can read easily.

inxi-10-k-mega-bash-shell-script-reporting-on-installed-system-computer-hardware

 

inxi -Fx

 

 

inxi-report-on-installed-hardware-on-my-lenovo-thinkpad-home-laptop

Each of the pointed above tools has different method of collection of Hardware information from various resources e.g. – kernel loaded modules, dmesg, files like /proc/meminfo /proc/version /proc/scsi/scsi /proc/partitions.
Hence some of the tools are likely to report more info than otheres, so in case if some information you need regarding the system plugged in hardware is missing you can perhaps obtain it from another program. Most Linux distribution desktop provided GNOME package are including Hardinfo gui tool, but in many cases above mentioned tools are likely to add even more on info on what is inside your PC Box.
If you're aware of others tools that are useful not mentioned here please share it.