Posts Tagged ‘var’

Monitor service log is continously growing with Zabbix on Windows with batch userparameter script and trigger Alert if log is unchanged

Thursday, March 17th, 2022

monitor-if-log-file-is-growing-with-zabbix-zabbix-userparameter-script-howto

Recently we had an inteteresting Monitoring work task to achieve. We have an Application that is constantly simulating encrypted connections traffic to a remote side machine and sending specific data on TCP/IP ports.
Communiucation between App Server A -> App Server B should be continous and if all is working as expected App Server A messages output are logged in the Application log file on the machine which by the way Runs
Windows Server 2020.

Sometimes due to Network issues this constant reconnections from the Application S. A to the remote checked machine TCP/IP ports gets interrupted due to LAN issues or a burned Network Switch equipment, misconfiguration on the network due to some Network admin making stoopid stuff etc..

Thus it was important to Monitor somehow whether the log is growing or not and feed the output of whether Application log file is growing or it stuck to a Central Zabbix Server. 
To be able to better understand the task, lets divide the desired outcome in few parts on required:

1. Find The latest file inside a folder C:\Path-to-Service\Monitoring\Log\
2. Open the and check it is current logged records and log the time
3. Re-open file in a short while and check whether in few seconds new records are written
4. Report the status out to Zabbix
5. Make Zabbix Item / Trigger / Action in case if monitored file is not growing

In below article I'll briefly explain how Monitoring a Log on a Machine for growing was implemented using a pure good old WIN .BAT (.batch) script and Zabbix Userparameter key

 

1. Enable userparameter script for Local Zabbix-Agent on the Windows 10 Server Host


Edit Zabbix config file usually on Windows Zabbix installs file is named:

zabbix_agentd.win ]


Uncomment the following lines to enable userparameter support for zabbix-agentd:

 

# Include=c:\zabbix\zabbix_agentd.userparams.conf

Include=c:\zabbix\zabbix_agentd.conf.d\

# Include=c:\zabbix\zabbix_agentd.conf.d\*.conf


2. Create folders for userparameter script and for the userparameter.conf

Before creating userparameter you can to create the folder and grant permissions

Folder name under C:\Zabbix -> zabbix_agentd.conf.d

If you don't want to use Windows Explorer) but do it via cmd line:

C:\Users\LOGUser> mkdir \Zabbix\zabbix_agentd.conf\
C:\User\LOGUser> mkdir \Zabbix\zabbix_scripts\


3. Create Userparameter with some name file ( Userparameter-Monitor-Grow.conf )

In the directory C:\Zabbix\zabbix_agentd.conf.d you should create a config file like:
Userparameter-Monitor-Grow.conf and in it you should have a standard userparameter key and script so file content is:

UserParameter=service.check,C:\Zabbix\zabbix_scripts\GROW_LOG_MONITOR-USERPARAMETER.BAT


4. Create the Batch script that will read the latest file in the service log folder and will periodically check and report to zabbix that file is changing

notepad C:\Zabbix\zabbix_scripts\GROW_LOG_MONITOR-USERPARAMETER.BAT

REM "SCRIPT MONITOR IF FILE IS GROWING OR NOT"
@echo off

set work_dir=C:\Path-to-Service\Monitoring\Log\

set client=client Name

set YYYYMMDD=%DATE:~10,4%%DATE:~4,2%%DATE:~7,2%

set name=csv%YYYYMMDD%.csv

set mytime=%TIME:~0,8%

for %%I in (..) do set CurrDirName=%%~nxI

 

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

set "line1=findstr /R /N "^^" %work_dir%\output.csv | find /C ":""


for /f %%a in ('!line1!') do set number1=%%a

set "line2=findstr /R /N "^^" %work_dir%\%name% | find /C ":""


for /f %%a in ('!line2!') do set number2=%%a

 

IF  %number1% == %number2% (

echo %YYYYMMDD% %mytime% MAJOR the log is not incrementing for %client%

echo %YYYYMMDD% %mytime% MAJOR the log is not incrementing for %client% >> monitor-grow_err.log

) ELSE (

echo %YYYYMMDD% %mytime% NORMAL the log is incrementing for %client%

SETLOCAL DisableDelayedExpansion

del %work_dir%\output.csv

FOR /F "usebackq delims=" %%a in (`"findstr /n ^^ %work_dir%\%name%"`) do (

    set "var=%%a"

    SETLOCAL EnableDelayedExpansion

    set "var=!var:*:=!"

    echo(!var! >> %work_dir%\output.csv

    ENDLOCAL

)

)
 

 

To download GROW_LOG_MONITOR-USERPARAMETER.BAT click here.
The script needs to have configured the path to directory containing multiple logs produced by the Monitored Application.
As prior said it will, list the latest created file based on DATE timestamp in the folder will output a simple messages:

If the log file is being fed with data the script will output to output.csv messages continuously, either:

%%mytime%% NORMAL the log is incrementing for %%client%%

Or if the Monitored application log is not writting anything for a period it will start writting messages

%%mytime%%mytime MAJOR the log is not incrementing for %client%

The messages will also be sent in Zabbix.

Before saving the script make sure you modify the Full Path location to the Monitored file for growing, i.e.:

set work_dir=C:\Path-to-Service\Monitoring\Log\


5. Create The Zabbix Item

Set whatever service.check name you would like and a check interval to fetch the info from the userparameter (if you're dealing with very large log files produced by Monitored log of application, then 10 minutes might be too frequent, in most cases 10 minutes should be fine)
monitor-if-log-grows-windows-zabbix-item-service-check-screenshot
 

6. Create Zabbix Trigger


You will need a Trigger something similar to below:

Now considering that zabbix server receives correctly data from the client and the monitored log is growing you should in Zabbix:

%%mytime%% NORMAL the log is incrementing for %%client%%


7. Lastly create an Action to send Email Alert if log is not growing

Create Linux High Availability Load Balancer Cluster with Keepalived and Haproxy on Linux

Tuesday, March 15th, 2022

keepalived-logo-linux

Configuring a Linux HA (High Availibiltiy) for an Application with Haproxy is already used across many Websites on the Internet and serious corporations that has a crucial infrastructure has long time
adopted and used keepalived to provide High Availability Application level Clustering.
Usually companies choose to use HA Clusters with Haproxy with Pacemaker and Corosync cluster tools.
However one common used alternative solution if you don't have the oportunity to bring up a High availability cluster with Pacemaker / Corosync / pcs (Pacemaker Configuration System) due to fact machines you need to configure the cluster on are not Physical but VMWare Virtual Machines which couldn't not have configured a separate Admin Lans and Heartbeat Lan as we usually do on a Pacemaker Cluster due to the fact the 5 Ethernet LAN Card Interfaces of the VMWare Hypervisor hosts are configured as a BOND (e.g. all the incoming traffic to the VMWare vSphere  HV is received on one Virtual Bond interface).

I assume you have 2 separate vSphere Hypervisor Physical Machines in separate Racks and separate switches hosting the two VMs.
For the article, I'll call the two brand new brought Virtual Machines with some installation automation software such as Terraform or Ansible – vm-server1 and vm-server2 which would have configured some recent version of Linux.

In that scenario to have a High Avaiability for the VMs on Application level and assure at least one of the two is available at a time if one gets broken due toe malfunction of the HV, a Network connectivity issue, or because the VM OS has crashed.
Then one relatively easily solution is to use keepalived and configurea single High Availability Virtual IP (VIP) Address, i.e. 10.10.10.1, which would float among two VMs using keepalived so at a time at least one of the two VMs would be reachable on the Network.

haproxy_keepalived-vip-ip-diagram-linux

Having a VIP IP is quite a common solution in corporate world, as it makes it pretty easy to add F5 Load Balancer in front of the keepalived cluster setup to have a 3 Level of security isolation, which usually consists of:

1. Physical (access to the hardware or Virtualization hosts)
2. System Access (The mechanism to access the system login credetials users / passes, proxies, entry servers leading to DMZ-ed network)
3. Application Level (access to different programs behind L2 and data based on the specific identity of the individual user,
special Secondary UserID,  Factor authentication, biometrics etc.)

 

1. Install keepalived and haproxy on machines

Depending on the type of Linux OS:

On both machines
 

[root@server1:~]# yum install -y keepalived haproxy

If you have to install keepalived / haproxy on Debian / Ubuntu and other Deb based Linux distros

[root@server1:~]# apt install keepalived haproxy –yes

2. Configure haproxy (haproxy.cfg) on both server1 and server2

 

Create some /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg configuration

 

[root@server1:~]vim /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg

#———————————————————————
# Global settings
#———————————————————————
global
    log          127.0.0.1 local6 debug
    chroot       /var/lib/haproxy
    pidfile      /run/haproxy.pid
    stats socket /var/lib/haproxy/haproxy.sock mode 0600 level admin 
    maxconn      4000
    user         haproxy
    group        haproxy
    daemon
    #debug
    #quiet

#———————————————————————
# common defaults that all the 'listen' and 'backend' sections will
# use if not designated in their block
#———————————————————————
defaults
    mode        tcp
    log         global
#    option      dontlognull
#    option      httpclose
#    option      httplog
#    option      forwardfor
    option      redispatch
    option      log-health-checks
    timeout connect 10000 # default 10 second time out if a backend is not found
    timeout client 300000
    timeout server 300000
    maxconn     60000
    retries     3

#———————————————————————
# round robin balancing between the various backends
#———————————————————————

listen FRONTEND_APPNAME1
        bind 10.10.10.1:15000
        mode tcp
        option tcplog
#        #log global
        log-format [%t]\ %ci:%cp\ %bi:%bp\ %b/%s:%sp\ %Tw/%Tc/%Tt\ %B\ %ts\ %ac/%fc/%bc/%sc/%rc\ %sq/%bq
        balance roundrobin
        timeout client 350000
        timeout server 350000
        timeout connect 35000
        server app-server1 10.10.10.55:30000 weight 1 check port 68888
        server app-server2 10.10.10.55:30000 weight 2 check port 68888

listen FRONTEND_APPNAME2
        bind 10.10.10.1:15000
        mode tcp
        option tcplog
        #log global
        log-format [%t]\ %ci:%cp\ %bi:%bp\ %b/%s:%sp\ %Tw/%Tc/%Tt\ %B\ %ts\ %ac/%fc/%bc/%sc/%rc\ %sq/%bq
        balance roundrobin
        timeout client 350000
        timeout server 350000
        timeout connect 35000
        server app-server1 10.10.10.55:30000 weight 5
        server app-server2 10.10.10.55:30000 weight 5 

 

You can get a copy of above haproxy.cfg configuration here.
Once configured roll it on.

[root@server1:~]#  systemctl start haproxy
 
[root@server1:~]# ps -ef|grep -i hapro
root      285047       1  0 Mar07 ?        00:00:00 /usr/sbin/haproxy -Ws -f /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg -p /run/haproxy.pid
haproxy   285050  285047  0 Mar07 ?        00:00:26 /usr/sbin/haproxy -Ws -f /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg -p /run/haproxy.pid

Bring up the haproxy also on server2 machine, by placing same configuration and starting up the proxy.
 

[root@server1:~]vim /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg


 

3. Configure keepalived on both servers

We'll be configuring 2 nodes with keepalived even though if necessery this can be easily extended and you can add more nodes.
First we make a copy of the original or existing server configuration keepalived.conf (just in case we need it later on or if you already had something other configured manually by someone – that could be so on inherited servers by other sysadmin)
 

[root@server1:~]# mv /etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf /etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf.orig
[root@server2:~]# mv /etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf /etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf.orig

a. Configure keepalived to serve as a MASTER Node

 

[root@server1:~]# vim /etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf

Master Node
global_defs {
  router_id server1-fqdn # The hostname of this host.
  
  enable_script_security
  # Synchro of the state of the connections between the LBs on the eth0 interface
   lvs_sync_daemon eth0
 
notification_email {
        linuxadmin@notify-domain.com     # Email address for notifications 
    }
 notification_email_from keepalived@server1-fqdn        # The from address for the notifications
    smtp_server 127.0.0.1                       # SMTP server address
    smtp_connect_timeout 15
}

vrrp_script haproxy {
  script "killall -0 haproxy"
  interval 2
  weight 2
  user root
}

vrrp_instance LB_VIP_QA {
  virtual_router_id 50
  advert_int 1
  priority 51

  state MASTER
  interface eth0
  smtp_alert          # Enable Notifications Via Email
  
  authentication {
              auth_type PASS
              auth_pass testp141

    }
### Commented because running on VM on VMWare
##    unicast_src_ip 10.44.192.134 # Private IP address of master
##    unicast_peer {
##        10.44.192.135           # Private IP address of the backup haproxy
##   }

#        }
# master node with higher priority preferred node for Virtual IP if both keepalived up
###  priority 51
###  state MASTER
###  interface eth0
  virtual_ipaddress {
     10.10.10.1 dev eth0 # The virtual IP address that will be shared between MASTER and BACKUP
  }
  track_script {
      haproxy
  }
}

 

 To dowload a copy of the Master keepalived.conf configuration click here

Below are few interesting configuration variables, worthy to mention few words on, most of them are obvious by their names but for more clarity I'll also give a list here with short description of each:

 

  • vrrp_instance – defines an individual instance of the VRRP protocol running on an interface.
  • state – defines the initial state that the instance should start in (i.e. MASTER / SLAVE )state –
  • interface – defines the interface that VRRP runs on.
  • virtual_router_id – should be unique value per Keepalived Node (otherwise slave master won't function properly)
  • priority – the advertised priority, the higher the priority the more important the respective configured keepalived node is.
  • advert_int – specifies the frequency that advertisements are sent at (1 second, in this case).
  • authentication – specifies the information necessary for servers participating in VRRP to authenticate with each other. In this case, a simple password is defined.
    only the first eight (8) characters will be used as described in  to note is Important thing
    man keepalived.conf – keepalived.conf variables documentation !!! Nota Bene !!! – Password set on each node should match for nodes to be able to authenticate !
  • virtual_ipaddress – defines the IP addresses (there can be multiple) that VRRP is responsible for.
  • notification_email – the notification email to which Alerts will be send in case if keepalived on 1 node is stopped (e.g. the MASTER node switches from host 1 to 2)
  • notification_email_from – email address sender from where email will originte
    ! NB ! In order for notification_email to be working you need to have configured MTA or Mail Relay (set to local MTA) to another SMTP – e.g. have configured something like Postfix, Qmail or Postfix

b. Configure keepalived to serve as a SLAVE Node

[root@server1:~]vim /etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf
 

#Slave keepalived
global_defs {
  router_id server2-fqdn # The hostname of this host!

  enable_script_security
  # Synchro of the state of the connections between the LBs on the eth0 interface
  lvs_sync_daemon eth0
 
notification_email {
        linuxadmin@notify-host.com     # Email address for notifications
    }
 notification_email_from keepalived@server2-fqdn        # The from address for the notifications
    smtp_server 127.0.0.1                       # SMTP server address
    smtp_connect_timeout 15
}

vrrp_script haproxy {
  script "killall -0 haproxy"
  interval 2
  weight 2
  user root
}

vrrp_instance LB_VIP_QA {
  virtual_router_id 50
  advert_int 1
  priority 50

  state BACKUP
  interface eth0
  smtp_alert          # Enable Notifications Via Email

authentication {
              auth_type PASS
              auth_pass testp141
}
### Commented because running on VM on VMWare    
##    unicast_src_ip 10.10.192.135 # Private IP address of master
##    unicast_peer {
##        10.10.192.134         # Private IP address of the backup haproxy
##   }

###  priority 50
###  state BACKUP
###  interface eth0
  virtual_ipaddress {
     10.10.10.1 dev eth0 # The virtual IP address that will be shared betwee MASTER and BACKUP.
  }
  track_script {
    haproxy
  }
}

 

Download the keepalived.conf slave config here

 

c. Set required sysctl parameters for haproxy to work as expected
 

[root@server1:~]vim /etc/sysctl.conf
#Haproxy config
# haproxy
net.core.somaxconn=65535
net.ipv4.ip_local_port_range = 1024 65000
net.ipv4.ip_nonlocal_bind = 1
net.ipv4.tcp_tw_reuse = 1
net.ipv4.tcp_max_syn_backlog = 10240
net.ipv4.tcp_max_tw_buckets = 400000
net.ipv4.tcp_max_orphans = 60000
net.ipv4.tcp_synack_retries = 3

4. Test Keepalived keepalived.conf configuration syntax is OK

 

[root@server1:~]keepalived –config-test
(/etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf: Line 7) Unknown keyword 'lvs_sync_daemon_interface'
(/etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf: Line 21) Unable to set default user for vrrp script haproxy – removing
(/etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf: Line 31) (LB_VIP_QA) Specifying lvs_sync_daemon_interface against a vrrp is deprecated.
(/etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf: Line 31)              Please use global lvs_sync_daemon
(/etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf: Line 35) Truncating auth_pass to 8 characters
(/etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf: Line 50) (LB_VIP_QA) track script haproxy not found, ignoring…

I've experienced this error because first time I've configured keepalived, I did not mention the user with which the vrrp script haproxy should run,
in prior versions of keepalived, leaving the field empty did automatically assumed you have the user with which the vrrp script runs to be set to root
as of RHELs keepalived-2.1.5-6.el8.x86_64, i've been using however this is no longer so and thus in prior configuration as you can see I've
set the user in respective section to root.
The error Unknown keyword 'lvs_sync_daemon_interface'
is also easily fixable by just substituting the lvs_sync_daemon_interface and lvs_sync_daemon and reloading
keepalived etc.

Once keepalived is started and you can see the process on both machines running in process list.

[root@server1:~]ps -ef |grep -i keepalived
root     1190884       1  0 18:50 ?        00:00:00 /usr/sbin/keepalived -D
root     1190885 1190884  0 18:50 ?        00:00:00 /usr/sbin/keepalived -D

Next step is to check the keepalived statuses as well as /var/log/keepalived.log

If everything is configured as expected on both keepalived on first node you should see one is master and one is slave either in the status or the log

[root@server1:~]#systemctl restart keepalived

 

[root@server1:~]systemctl status keepalived|grep -i state
Mar 14 18:59:02 server1-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1192003]: (LB_VIP_QA) Entering MASTER STATE

[root@server1:~]systemctl status keepalived

● keepalived.service – LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/keepalived.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: inactive (dead) since Mon 2022-03-14 18:15:51 CET; 32min ago
  Process: 1187587 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/keepalived $KEEPALIVED_OPTIONS (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
 Main PID: 1187589 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)

Mar 14 18:15:04 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1187590]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.44.192.142
Mar 14 18:15:50 server1lb-fqdn systemd[1]: Stopping LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor…
Mar 14 18:15:50 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived[1187589]: Stopping
Mar 14 18:15:50 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1187590]: (LB_VIP_QA) sent 0 priority
Mar 14 18:15:50 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1187590]: (LB_VIP_QA) removing VIPs.
Mar 14 18:15:51 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1187590]: Stopped – used 0.002007 user time, 0.016303 system time
Mar 14 18:15:51 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived[1187589]: CPU usage (self/children) user: 0.000000/0.038715 system: 0.001061/0.166434
Mar 14 18:15:51 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived[1187589]: Stopped Keepalived v2.1.5 (07/13,2020)
Mar 14 18:15:51 server1lb-fqdn systemd[1]: keepalived.service: Succeeded.
Mar 14 18:15:51 server1lb-fqdn systemd[1]: Stopped LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor

[root@server2:~]systemctl status keepalived|grep -i state
Mar 14 18:59:02 server2-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: (LB_VIP_QA) Entering BACKUP STATE

[root@server1:~]# grep -i state /var/log/keepalived.log
Mar 14 18:59:02 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: (LB_VIP_QA) Entering MASTER STATE
 

a. Fix Keepalived SECURITY VIOLATION – scripts are being executed but script_security not enabled.
 

When configurating keepalived for a first time we have faced the following strange error inside keepalived status inside keepalived.log 
 

Feb 23 14:28:41 server1 Keepalived_vrrp[945478]: SECURITY VIOLATION – scripts are being executed but script_security not enabled.

 

To fix keepalived SECURITY VIOLATION error:

Add to /etc/keepalived/keepalived.conf on the keepalived node hosts
inside 

global_defs {}

After chunk
 

enable_script_security

include

# Synchro of the state of the connections between the LBs on the eth0 interface
  lvs_sync_daemon_interface eth0

 

5. Prepare rsyslog configuration and Inlcude additional keepalived options
to force keepalived log into /var/log/keepalived.log

To force keepalived log into /var/log/keepalived.log on RHEL 8 / CentOS and other Redhat Package Manager (RPM) Linux distributions

[root@server1:~]# vim /etc/rsyslog.d/48_keepalived.conf

#2022/02/02: HAProxy logs to local6, save the messages
local7.*                                                /var/log/keepalived.log
if ($programname == 'Keepalived') then -/var/log/keepalived.log
if ($programname == 'Keepalived_vrrp') then -/var/log/keepalived.log
& stop

[root@server:~]# touch /var/log/keepalived.log

Reload rsyslog to load new config
 

[root@server:~]# systemctl restart rsyslog
[root@server:~]# systemctl status rsyslog

 

rsyslog.service – System Logging Service
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/rsyslog.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
  Drop-In: /etc/systemd/system/rsyslog.service.d
           └─rsyslog-service.conf
   Active: active (running) since Mon 2022-03-07 13:34:38 CET; 1 weeks 0 days ago
     Docs: man:rsyslogd(8)

           https://www.rsyslog.com/doc/
 Main PID: 269574 (rsyslogd)
    Tasks: 6 (limit: 100914)
   Memory: 5.1M
   CGroup: /system.slice/rsyslog.service
           └─269574 /usr/sbin/rsyslogd -n

Mar 15 08:15:16 server1lb-fqdn rsyslogd[269574]: — MARK —
Mar 15 08:35:16 server1lb-fqdn rsyslogd[269574]: — MARK —
Mar 15 08:55:16 server1lb-fqdn rsyslogd[269574]: — MARK —

 

If once keepalived is loaded but you still have no log written inside /var/log/keepalived.log

[root@server1:~]# vim /etc/sysconfig/keepalived
 KEEPALIVED_OPTIONS="-D -S 7"

[root@server2:~]# vim /etc/sysconfig/keepalived
 KEEPALIVED_OPTIONS="-D -S 7"

[root@server1:~]# systemctl restart keepalived.service
[root@server1:~]#  systemctl status keepalived

● keepalived.service – LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/keepalived.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: active (running) since Thu 2022-02-24 12:12:20 CET; 2 weeks 4 days ago
 Main PID: 1030501 (keepalived)
    Tasks: 2 (limit: 100914)
   Memory: 1.8M
   CGroup: /system.slice/keepalived.service
           ├─1030501 /usr/sbin/keepalived -D
           └─1030502 /usr/sbin/keepalived -D

Warning: Journal has been rotated since unit was started. Log output is incomplete or unavailable.

[root@server2:~]# systemctl restart keepalived.service
[root@server2:~]# systemctl status keepalived

6. Monitoring VRRP traffic of the two keepaliveds with tcpdump
 

Once both keepalived are up and running a good thing is to check the VRRP protocol traffic keeps fluently on both machines.
Keepalived VRRP keeps communicating over the TCP / IP Port 112 thus you can simply snoop TCP tracffic on its protocol.
 

[root@server1:~]# tcpdump proto 112

tcpdump: verbose output suppressed, use -v or -vv for full protocol decode
listening on eth0, link-type EN10MB (Ethernet), capture size 262144 bytes
11:08:07.356187 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:08.356297 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:09.356408 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:10.356511 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:11.356655 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20

[root@server2:~]# tcpdump proto 112

tcpdump: verbose output suppressed, use -v or -vv for full protocol decode
​listening on eth0, link-type EN10MB (Ethernet), capture size 262144 bytes
11:08:07.356187 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:08.356297 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:09.356408 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:10.356511 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20
11:08:11.356655 IP server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20

As you can see the VRRP traffic on the network is originating only from server1lb-fqdn, this is so because host server1lb-fqdn is the keepalived configured master node.

It is possible to spoof the password configured to authenticate between two nodes, thus if you're bringing up keepalived service cluster make sure your security is tight at best the machines should be in a special local LAN DMZ, do not configure DMZ on the internet !!! 🙂 Or if you eventually decide to configure keepalived in between remote hosts, make sure you somehow use encrypted VPN or SSH tunnels to tunnel the VRRP traffic.

[root@server1:~]tcpdump proto 112 -vv
tcpdump: listening on eth0, link-type EN10MB (Ethernet), capture size 262144 bytes
11:36:25.530772 IP (tos 0xc0, ttl 255, id 59838, offset 0, flags [none], proto VRRP (112), length 40)
    server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: vrrp server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20, addrs: VIPIP_QA auth "testp431"
11:36:26.530874 IP (tos 0xc0, ttl 255, id 59839, offset 0, flags [none], proto VRRP (112), length 40)
    server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: vrrp server1lb-fqdn > vrrp.mcast.net: VRRPv2, Advertisement, vrid 50, prio 53, authtype simple, intvl 1s, length 20, addrs: VIPIP_QA auth "testp431"

Lets also check what floating IP is configured on the machines:

[root@server1:~]# ip -brief address show
lo               UNKNOWN        127.0.0.1/8 
eth0             UP             10.10.10.5/26 10.10.10.1/32 

The 10.10.10.5 IP is the main IP set on LAN interface eth0, 10.10.10.1 is the floating IP which as you can see is currently set by keepalived to listen on first node.

[root@server2:~]# ip -brief address show |grep -i 10.10.10.1

An empty output is returned as floating IP is currently configured on server1

To double assure ourselves the IP is assigned on correct machine, lets ping it and check the IP assigned MAC  currently belongs to which machine.
 

[root@server2:~]# ping 10.10.10.1
PING 10.10.10.1 (10.10.10.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 10.10.10.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.526 ms
^C
— 10.10.10.1 ping statistics —
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.526/0.526/0.526/0.000 ms

[root@server2:~]# arp -an |grep -i 10.44.192.142
? (10.10.10.1) at 00:48:54:91:83:7d [ether] on eth0
[root@server2:~]# ip a s|grep -i 00:48:54:91:83:7d
[root@server2:~]# 

As you can see from below output MAC is not found in configured IPs on server2.
 

[root@server1-fqdn:~]# /sbin/ip a s|grep -i 00:48:54:91:83:7d -B1 -A1
 eth0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:48:54:91:83:7d brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
inet 10.10.10.1/26 brd 10.10.1.191 scope global noprefixroute eth0

Pretty much expected MAC is on keepalived node server1.

 

7. Testing keepalived on server1 and server2 maachines VIP floating IP really works
 

To test the overall configuration just created, you should stop keeaplived on the Master node and in meantime keep an eye on Slave node (server2), whether it can figure out the Master node is gone and switch its
state BACKUP to save MASTER. By changing the secondary (Slave) keepalived to master the floating IP: 10.10.10.1 will be brought up by the scripts on server2.

Lets assume that something went wrong with server1 VM host, for example the machine crashed due to service overload, DDoS or simply a kernel bug or whatever reason.
To simulate that we simply have to stop keepalived, then the broadcasted information on VRRP TCP/IP proto port 112 will be no longer available and keepalived on node server2, once
unable to communicate to server1 should chnage itself to state MASTER.

[root@server1:~]# systemctl stop keepalived
[root@server1:~]# systemctl status keepalived

● keepalived.service – LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/keepalived.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: inactive (dead) since Tue 2022-03-15 12:11:33 CET; 3s ago
  Process: 1192001 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/keepalived $KEEPALIVED_OPTIONS (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
 Main PID: 1192002 (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)

Mar 14 18:59:07 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1192003]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:32 server1lb-fqdn systemd[1]: Stopping LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor…
Mar 15 12:11:32 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived[1192002]: Stopping
Mar 15 12:11:32 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1192003]: (LB_VIP_QA) sent 0 priority
Mar 15 12:11:32 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1192003]: (LB_VIP_QA) removing VIPs.
Mar 15 12:11:33 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[1192003]: Stopped – used 2.145252 user time, 15.513454 system time
Mar 15 12:11:33 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived[1192002]: CPU usage (self/children) user: 0.000000/44.555362 system: 0.001151/170.118126
Mar 15 12:11:33 server1lb-fqdn Keepalived[1192002]: Stopped Keepalived v2.1.5 (07/13,2020)
Mar 15 12:11:33 server1lb-fqdn systemd[1]: keepalived.service: Succeeded.
Mar 15 12:11:33 server1lb-fqdn systemd[1]: Stopped LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor.

 

On keepalived off, you will get also a notification Email on the Receipt Email configured from keepalived.conf from the working keepalived node with a simple message like:

=> VRRP Instance is no longer owning VRRP VIPs <=

Once keepalived is back up you will get another notification like:

=> VRRP Instance is now owning VRRP VIPs <=

[root@server2:~]# systemctl status keepalived
● keepalived.service – LVS and VRRP High Availability Monitor
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/keepalived.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: active (running) since Mon 2022-03-14 18:13:52 CET; 17h ago
  Process: 297366 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/keepalived $KEEPALIVED_OPTIONS (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
 Main PID: 297367 (keepalived)
    Tasks: 2 (limit: 100914)
   Memory: 2.1M
   CGroup: /system.slice/keepalived.service
           ├─297367 /usr/sbin/keepalived -D -S 7
           └─297368 /usr/sbin/keepalived -D -S 7

Mar 15 12:11:33 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:33 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:33 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Remote SMTP server [127.0.0.1]:25 connected.
Mar 15 12:11:33 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: SMTP alert successfully sent.
Mar 15 12:11:38 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: (LB_VIP_QA) Sending/queueing gratuitous ARPs on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:38 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:38 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:38 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:38 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1
Mar 15 12:11:38 server2lb-fqdn Keepalived_vrrp[297368]: Sending gratuitous ARP on eth0 for 10.10.10.1

[root@server2:~]#  ip addr show|grep -i 10.10.10.1
    inet 10.10.10.1/32 scope global eth0
    

As you see the VIP is now set on server2, just like expected – that's OK, everything works as expected. If the IP did not move double check the keepalived.conf on both nodes for errors or misconfigurations.

To recover the initial order of things so server1 is MASTER and server2 SLAVE host, we just have to switch on the keepalived on server1 machine.

[root@server1:~]# systemctl start keepalived

The automatic change of server1 to MASTER node and respective move of the VIP IP is done because of the higher priority (of importance we previously configured on server1 in keepalived.conf).
 

What we learned?
 

So what we learned in  this article?
We have seen how to easily install and configure a High Availability Load balancer with Keepalived with single floating VIP IP address with 1 MASTER and 1 SLAVE host and a Haproxy example config with few frontends / App backends. We have seen how the config can be tested for potential errors and how we can monitor whether the VRRP2 network traffic flows between nodes and how to potentially debug it further if necessery.
Further on rawly explained some of the keepalived configurations but as keepalived can do pretty much more,for anyone seriously willing to deal with keepalived on a daily basis or just fine tune some already existing ones, you better read closely its manual page "man keepalived.conf" as well as the official Redhat Linux documentation page on setting up a Linux cluster with Keepalived (Be prepare for a small nightmare as the documentation of it seems to be a bit chaotic, and even I would say partly missing or opening questions on what does the developers did meant – not strange considering the havoc that is pretty much as everywhere these days.)

Finally once keepalived hosts are prepared, it was shown how to test the keepalived application cluster and Floating IP does move between nodes in case if one of the 2 keepalived nodes is inaccessible.

The same logic can be repeated multiple times and if necessery you can set multiple VIPs to expand the HA reachable IPs solution.

high-availability-with-two-vips-example-diagram

The presented idea is with haproxy forward Proxy server to proxy requests towards Application backend (servince machines), however if you need to set another set of server on the flow to  process HTML / XHTML / PHP / Perl / Python  programming code, with some common Webserver setup ( Nginx / Apache / Tomcat / JBOSS) and enable SSL Secure certificate with lets say Letsencrypt, this can be relatively easily done. If you want to implement letsencrypt and a webserver check this redundant SSL Load Balancing with haproxy & keepalived article.

That's all folks, hope you enjoyed.
If you need to configure keepalived Cluster or a consultancy write your query here 🙂

Fix weird double logging in haproxy.log file due to haproxy.cfg misconfiguration

Tuesday, March 8th, 2022

haproxy-logging-front-network-back-network-diagram

While we were building a new machine that will serve as a Haproxy server proxy frontend to tunnel some traffic to a number of backends, 
came across weird oddity. The call requests sent to the haproxy and redirected to backend servers, were being written in the log twice.

Since we have two backend Application servers hat are serving the request, my first guess was this is caused by the fact haproxy
tries to connect to both nodes on each sent request, or that the double logging is caused by the rsyslogd doing something strange on each
received query. The rsyslog configuration configured to send via local6 facility to rsyslog is like that:

$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerAddress 127.0.0.1
$UDPServerRun 514
#2022/02/02: HAProxy logs to local6, save the messages
local6.*                                                /var/log/haproxy.log


The haproxy basic global and defaults and frontend section config is like that:
 

global
    log          127.0.0.1 local6 debug
    chroot       /var/lib/haproxy
    pidfile      /run/haproxy.pid
    stats socket /var/lib/haproxy/haproxy.sock mode 0600 level admin
    maxconn      4000
    user         haproxy
    group        haproxy
    daemon

 

defaults
    mode        tcp
    log         global
#    option      dontlognull
#    option      httpclose
#    option      httplog
#    option      forwardfor
    option      redispatch
    option      log-health-checks
    timeout connect 10000 # default 10 second time out if a backend is not found
    timeout client 300000
    timeout server 300000
    maxconn     60000
    retries     3
 

listen FRONTEND1
        bind 10.71.80.5:63750
        mode tcp
        option tcplog
        log global
        log-format [%t]\ %ci:%cp\ %bi:%bp\ %b/%s:%sp\ %Tw/%Tc/%Tt\ %B\ %ts\ %ac/%fc/%bc/%sc/%rc\ %sq/%bq
        balance roundrobin
        timeout client 350000
        timeout server 350000
        timeout connect 35000
        server backend-host1 10.80.50.1:13750 weight 1 check port 15000
        server backend-host2 10.80.50.2:13750 weight 2 check port 15000

After quick research online on why this odd double logging of request ends in /var/log/haproxy.log it turns out this is caused by the 

log global  defined double under the defaults section as well as in the frontend itself, hence to resolve simply had to comment out the log global in Frontend, so it looks like so:

listen FRONTEND1
        bind 10.71.80.5:63750
        mode tcp
        option tcplog
  #      log global
        log-format [%t]\ %ci:%cp\ %bi:%bp\ %b/%s:%sp\ %Tw/%Tc/%Tt\ %B\ %ts\ %ac/%fc/%bc/%sc/%rc\ %sq/%bq
        balance roundrobin
        timeout client 350000
        timeout server 350000
        timeout connect 35000
        server backend-host1 10.80.50.1:13750 weight 1 check port 15000
        server backend-host2 10.80.50.2:13750 weight 2 check port 15000

 


Next just reloaded haproxy and one request started leaving only one trail inside haproxy.log as expected 🙂
 

Zabbix rkhunter monitoring check if rootkits trojans and viruses or suspicious OS activities are detected

Wednesday, December 8th, 2021

monitor-rkhunter-with-zabbix-zabbix-rkhunter-check-logo

If you're using rkhunter to monitor for malicious activities, a binary changes, rootkits, viruses, malware, suspicious stuff and other famous security breach possible or actual issues, perhaps you have configured your machines to report to some Email.
But what if you want to have a scheduled rkhunter running on the machine and you don't want to count too much on email alerting (especially because email alerting) makes possible for emails to be tracked by sysadmin pretty late?

We have been in those situation and in this case me and my dear colleague Georgi Stoyanov developed a small rkhunter Zabbix userparameter check to track and Alert if any traces of "Warning"''s are mateched in the traditional rkhunter log file /var/log/rkhunter/rkhunter.log

To set it up and use it is pretty use you will need to have a recent version of zabbix-agent installed on the machine and connected to a Zabbix server, in my case this is:

[root@centos ~]# rpm -qa |grep -i zabbix-agent
zabbix-agent-4.0.7-1.el7.x86_64

 placed inside /etc/zabbix/zabbix_agentd.d/userparameter_rkhunter_warning_check.conf

[root@centos /etc/zabbix/zabbix_agentd.d ]# cat userparameter_rkhunter_warning_check.conf
# userparameter script to check if any Warning is inside /var/log/rkhunter/rkhunter.log and if found to trigger Zabbix alert
UserParameter=rkhunter.warning, (TODAY=$(date |awk '{ print $1" "$2" "$3 }'); if [ $(cat /var/log/rkhunter/rkhunter.log | awk “/$TODAY/,EOF” | /bin/grep -i ‘\[ Warning \]’ | /usr/bin/wc -l) != ‘0’ ]; then echo 1; else echo 0; fi)
UserParameter=rkhunter.suspected,(/bin/grep -i 'Suspect files: ' /var/log/rkhunter/rkhunter.log|tail -n 1| awk '{ print $4 }')
UserParameter=rkhunter.rootkits,(/bin/grep -i 'Possible rootkits: ' /var/log/rkhunter/rkhunter.log|tail -n 1| awk '{ print $4 }')


2. Prepare Rkhunter Template, Triggers and Items


In Zabbix Server that you access from web control interface, you will have to prepare a new template called lets say Rkhunter with the necessery Triggers and Items


2.1 Create Rkhunter Items
 

On Zabbix Server side, uou will have to configure 3 Items for the 3 configured userparameter above script keys, like so:

rkhunter-items-zabbix-screenshot.png

  • rkhunter.suspected Item configuration


rkhunter-suspected-files

  • rkhunter.warning Zabbix Item config

rkhunter-warning-found-check-zabbix

  • rkhunter.rootkits Zabbix Item config

     

     

    rkhunter-zabbix-possible-rootkits-item1

    2.2 Create Triggers
     

You need to have an overall of 3 triggers like in below shot:

zabbix-rkhunter-all-triggers-screenshot
 

  • rkhunter.rootkits Trigger config

rkhunter-rootkits-trigger-zabbix1

  • rkhunter.suspected Trigger cfg

rkhunter-suspected-trigger-zabbix1

  • rkhunter warning Trigger cfg

rkhunter-warning-trigger1

3. Reload zabbix-agent and test the keys


It is necessery to reload zabbix agent for the new userparameter to start to be sent to remote zabbix server (through a proxy if you have one configured).

[root@centos ~]# systemctl restart zabbix-agent


To make the zabbix-agent send the keys to the server you can use zabbix_sender to have the test tool you will have to have installed (zabbix-sender) on the server.

To trigger a manualTest if you happen to have some problems with the key which shouldn''t be the case you can sent a value to the respectve key with below command:

[root@centos ~ ]# zabbix_sender -vv -c "/etc/zabbix/zabbix_agentd.conf" -k "khunter.warning" -o "1"


Check on Zabbix Server the sent value is received, for any oddities as usual check what is inside  /var/log/zabbix/zabbix_agentd.log for any errors or warnings.

Install and configure rkhunter for improved security on a PCI DSS Linux / BSD servers with no access to Internet

Wednesday, November 10th, 2021

install-and-configure-rkhunter-with-tightened-security-variables-rkhunter-logo

rkhunter or Rootkit Hunter scans systems for known and unknown rootkits. The tool is not new and most system administrators that has to mantain some good security servers perhaps already use it in their daily sysadmin tasks.

It does this by comparing SHA-1 Hashes of important files with known good ones in online databases, searching for default directories (of rootkits), wrong permissions, hidden files, suspicious strings in kernel modules, commmon backdoors, sniffers and exploits as well as other special tests mostly for Linux and FreeBSD though a ports for other UNIX operating systems like Solaris etc. are perhaps available. rkhunter is notable due to its inclusion in popular mainstream FOSS operating systems (CentOS, Fedora,Debian, Ubuntu etc.).

Even though rkhunter is not rapidly improved over the last 3 years (its last Official version release was on 20th of Febuary 2018), it is a good tool that helps to strengthen even further security and it is often a requirement for Unix servers systems that should follow the PCI DSS Standards (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards).

Configuring rkhunter is a pretty straight forward if you don't have too much requirements but I decided to write this article for the reason there are fwe interesting options that you might want to adopt in configuration to whitelist any files that are reported as Warnings, as well as how to set a configuration that sets a stricter security checks than the installation defaults. 

1. Install rkhunter .deb / .rpm package depending on the Linux distro or BSD

  • If you have to place it on a Redhat based distro CentOS / Redhat / Fedora

[root@Centos ~]# yum install -y rkhunter

 

  • On Debian distros the package name is equevallent to install there exec usual:

root@debian:~# apt install –yes rkhunter

  • On FreeBSD / NetBSD or other BSD forks you can install it from the BSD "World" ports system or install it from a precompiled binary.

freebsd# pkg install rkhunter

One important note to make here is to have a fully functional Alarming from rkhunter, you will have to have a fully functional configured postfix / exim / qmail whatever mail server to relay via official SMTP so you the Warning Alarm emails be able to reach your preferred Alarm email address. If you haven't installed postfix for example and configure it you might do.

– On Deb based distros 

[root@Centos ~]#yum install postfix


– On RPM based distros

root@debian:~# apt-get install –yes postfix


and as minimum, further on configure some functional Email Relay server within /etc/postfix/main.cf
 

# vi /etc/postfix/main.cf
relayhost = [relay.smtp-server.com]

2. Prepare rkhunter.conf initial configuration


Depending on what kind of files are present on the filesystem it could be for some reasons some standard package binaries has to be excluded for verification, because they possess unusual permissions because of manual sys admin monification this is done with the rkhunter variable PKGMGR_NO_VRFY.

If remote logging is configured on the system via something like rsyslog you will want to specificly tell it to rkhunter so this check as a possible security issue is skipped via ALLOW_SYSLOG_REMOTE_LOGGING=1. 

In case if remote root login via SSH protocol is disabled via /etc/ssh/sshd_config
PermitRootLogin no variable, the variable to include is ALLOW_SSH_ROOT_USER=no

It is useful to also increase the hashing check algorithm for security default one SHA256 you might want to change to SHA512, this is done via rkhunter.conf var HASH_CMD=SHA512

Triggering new email Warnings has to be configured so you receive, new mails at a preconfigured mailbox of your choice via variable
MAIL-ON-WARNING=SetMailAddress

 

# vi /etc/rkhunter.conf

PKGMGR_NO_VRFY=/usr/bin/su

PKGMGR_NO_VRFY=/usr/bin/passwd

ALLOW_SYSLOG_REMOTE_LOGGING=1

# Needed for corosync/pacemaker since update 19.11.2020

ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-*/qb-*

# enabled ssh root access skip

ALLOW_SSH_ROOT_USER=no

HASH_CMD=SHA512

# Email address to sent alert in case of Warnings

MAIL-ON-WARNING=Your-Customer@Your-Email-Server-Destination-Address.com

MAIL-ON-WARNING=Your-Second-Peronsl-Email-Address@SMTP-Server.com

DISABLE_TESTS=os_specific


Optionally if you're using something specific such as corosync / pacemaker High Availability cluster or some specific software that is creating /dev/ files identified as potential Risks you might want to add more rkhunter.conf options like:
 

# Allow PCS/Pacemaker/Corosync
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-attrd-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-cfg-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-cib_rw-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-cib_shm-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-corosync-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-cpg-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-lrmd-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-pengine-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-quorum-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-stonith-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/pulse-shm-*
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/md/md-device-map
# Needed for corosync/pacemaker since update 19.11.2020
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-*/qb-*

# tomboy creates this one
ALLOWDEVFILE="/dev/shm/mono.*"
# created by libv4l
ALLOWDEVFILE="/dev/shm/libv4l-*"
# created by spice video
ALLOWDEVFILE="/dev/shm/spice.*"
# created by mdadm
ALLOWDEVFILE="/dev/md/autorebuild.pid"
# 389 Directory Server
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/sem.slapd-*.stats
# squid proxy
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/squid-cf*
# squid ssl cache
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/squid-ssl_session_cache.shm
# Allow podman
ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/libpod*lock*

 

3. Set the proper mirror database URL location to internal network repository

 

Usually  file /var/lib/rkhunter/db/mirrors.dat does contain Internet server address where latest version of mirrors.dat could be fetched, below is how it looks by default on Debian 10 Linux.

root@debian:/var/lib/rkhunter/db# cat mirrors.dat 
Version:2007060601
mirror=http://rkhunter.sourceforge.net
mirror=http://rkhunter.sourceforge.net

As you can guess a machine that doesn't have access to the Internet neither directly, neither via some kind of secure proxy because it is in a Paranoic Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) Network with many firewalls. What you can do then is setup another Mirror server (Apache / Nginx) within the local PCI secured LAN that gets regularly the database from official database on http://rkhunter.sourceforge.net/ (by installing and running rkhunter –update command on the Mirror WebServer and copying data under some directory structure on the remote local LAN accessible server, to keep the DB uptodate you might want to setup a cron to periodically copy latest available rkhunter database towards the http://mirror-url/path-folder/)

# vi /var/lib/rkhunter/db/mirrors.dat

local=http://rkhunter-url-mirror-server-url.com/rkhunter/1.4/


A mirror copy of entire db files from Debian 10.8 ( Buster ) ready for download are here.

Update entire file property db and check for rkhunter db updates

 

# rkhunter –update && rkhunter –propupdate

[ Rootkit Hunter version 1.4.6 ]

Checking rkhunter data files…
  Checking file mirrors.dat                                  [ Skipped ]
  Checking file programs_bad.dat                             [ No update ]
  Checking file backdoorports.dat                            [ No update ]
  Checking file suspscan.dat                                 [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/cn                                      [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/de                                      [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/en                                      [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/tr                                      [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/tr.utf8                                 [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/zh                                      [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/zh.utf8                                 [ No update ]
  Checking file i18n/ja                                      [ No update ]

 

rkhunter-update-propupdate-screenshot-centos-linux


4. Initiate a first time check and see whether something is not triggering Warnings

# rkhunter –check

rkhunter-checking-for-rootkits-linux-screenshot

As you might have to run the rkhunter multiple times, there is annoying Press Enter prompt, between checks. The idea of it is that you're able to inspect what went on but since usually, inspecting /var/log/rkhunter/rkhunter.log is much more easier, I prefer to skip this with –skip-keypress option.

# rkhunter –check  –skip-keypress


5. Whitelist additional files and dev triggering false warnings alerts


You have to keep in mind many files which are considered to not be officially PCI compatible and potentially dangerous such as lynx browser curl, telnet etc. might trigger Warning, after checking them thoroughfully with some AntiVirus software such as Clamav and checking the MD5 checksum compared to a clean installed .deb / .rpm package on another RootKit, Virus, Spyware etc. Clean system (be it virtual machine or a Testing / Staging) machine you might want to simply whitelist the files which are incorrectly detected as dangerous for the system security.

Again this can be achieved with

PKGMGR_NO_VRFY=

Some Cluster softwares that are preparing their own /dev/ temporary files such as Pacemaker / Corosync might also trigger alarms, so you might want to suppress this as well with ALLOWDEVFILE

ALLOWDEVFILE=/dev/shm/qb-*/qb-*


If Warnings are found check what is the issue and if necessery white list files due to incorrect permissions in /etc/rkhunter.conf .

rkhunter-warnings-found-screenshot

Re-run the check until all appears clean as in below screenshot.

rkhunter-clean-report-linux-screenshot

Fixing Checking for a system logging configuration file [ Warning ]

If you happen to get some message like, message appears when rkhunter -C is done on legacy CentOS release 6.10 (Final) servers:

[13:45:29] Checking for a system logging configuration file [ Warning ]
[13:45:29] Warning: The 'systemd-journald' daemon is running, but no configuration file can be found.
[13:45:29] Checking if syslog remote logging is allowed [ Allowed ]

To fix it, you will have to disable SYSLOG_CONFIG_FILE at all.
 

SYSLOG_CONFIG_FILE=NONE

Fix Out of inodes on Postfix Linux Mail Cluster. How to clean up filesystem running out of Inodes, Filesystem inodes on partition is 100% full

Wednesday, August 25th, 2021

Inode_Entry_inode-table-content

Recently we have faced a strange issue with with one of our Clustered Postfix Mail servers (the cluster is with 2 nodes that each has configured Postfix daemon mail servers (running on an OpenVZ virtualized environment).
A heartbeat that checks liveability of clusters and switches nodes in case of one of the two gets broken due to some reason), pretty much a standard SMTP cluster.

So far so good but since the cluster is a kind of abondoned and is pretty much legacy nowadays and used just for some Monitoring emails from different scripts and systems on servers, it was not really checked thoroughfully for years and logically out of sudden the alarming email content sent via the cluster stopped working.

The normal sysadmin job here  was to analyze what is going on with the cluster and fix it ASAP. After some very basic analyzing we catched the problem is caused by a  "inodes full" (100% of available inodes were occupied) problem, e.g. file system run out of inodes on both machines perhaps due to a pengine heartbeat process  bug  leading to producing a high number of .bz2 pengine recovery archive files stored in /var/lib/pengine>

Below are the few steps taken to analyze and fix the problem.
 

1. Finding out about the the system run out of inodes problem


After logging on to system and not finding something immediately is wrong with inodes, all I can see from crm_mon is cluster was broken.
A plenty of emails were left inside the postfix mail queue visible with a standard command

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# postqueue -p

It took me a while to find ot the problem is with inodes because a simple df -h  was showing systems have enough space but still cluster quorum was not complete.
A bit of further investigation led me to a  simple df -i reporting the number of inodes on the local filesystems on both our SMTP1 and SMTP2 got all occupied.

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# df -i
Filesystem            Inodes   IUsed   IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/simfs            500000   500000  0   100% /
none                   65536      61   65475    1% /dev

As you can see the number of inodes on the Virual Machine are unfortunately depleted

Next step was to check directories occupying most inodes, as this is the place from where files could be temporary moved to a remote server filesystem or moved to another partition with space on a server locally attached drives.
Below command gives an ordered list with directories locally under the mail root filesystem / and its respective occupied number files / inodes,
the more files under a directory the more inodes are being occupied by the files on the filesystem.

 

run-out-if-inodes-what-is-inode-find-out-which-filesystem-or-directory-eating-up-all-your-system-inodes-linux_inode_diagram.gif
1.1 Getting which directory consumes most of the inodes on the systems

 

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# { find / -xdev -printf '%h\n' | sort | uniq -c | sort -k 1 -n; } 2>/dev/null
….
…..

…….
    586 /usr/lib64/python2.4
    664 /usr/lib64
    671 /usr/share/man/man8
    860 /usr/bin
   1006 /usr/share/man/man1
   1124 /usr/share/man/man3p
   1246 /var/lib/Pegasus/prev_repository_2009-03-10-1236698426.308128000.rpmsave/root#cimv2/classes
   1246 /var/lib/Pegasus/prev_repository_2009-05-18-1242636104.524113000.rpmsave/root#cimv2/classes
   1246 /var/lib/Pegasus/prev_repository_2009-11-06-1257494054.380244000.rpmsave/root#cimv2/classes
   1246 /var/lib/Pegasus/prev_repository_2010-08-04-1280907760.750543000.rpmsave/root#cimv2/classes
   1381 /var/lib/Pegasus/prev_repository_2010-11-15-1289811714.398469000.rpmsave/root#cimv2/classes
   1381 /var/lib/Pegasus/prev_repository_2012-03-19-1332151633.572875000.rpmsave/root#cimv2/classes
   1398 /var/lib/Pegasus/repository/root#cimv2/classes
   1696 /usr/share/man/man3
   400816 /var/lib/pengine

Note, the above command orders the files from bottom to top order and obviosuly the bottleneck directory that is over-eating Filesystem inodes with an exceeding amount of files is
/var/lib/pengine
 

2. Backup old multitude of files just in case of something goes wrong with the cluster after some files are wiped out


The next logical step of course is to check what is going on inside /var/lib/pengine just to find a very ,very large amount of pe-input-*NUMBER*.bz2 files were suddenly produced.

 

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# ls -1 pe-input*.bz2 | wc -l
 400816


The files are produced by the pengine process which is one of the processes that is controlling the heartbeat cluster state, presumably it is done by running process:

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# ps -ef|grep -i pengine
24        5649  5521  0 Aug10 ?        00:00:26 /usr/lib64/heartbeat/pengine


Hence in order to fix the issue, to prevent some inconsistencies in the cluster due to the file deletion,  copied the whole directory to another mounted parition (you can mount it remotely with sshfs for example) or use a local one if you have one:

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# cp -rpf /var/lib/pengine /mnt/attached_storage


and proceeded to clean up some old multitde of files that are older than 2 years of times (720 days):


3. Clean  up /var/lib/pengine files that are older than two years with short loop and find command

 


First I made a list with all the files to be removed in external text file and quickly reviewed it by lessing it like so

[root@smtp1: ~ ]#  cd /var/lib/pengine
[root@smtp1: ~ ]# find . -type f -mtime +720|grep -v pe-error.last | grep -v pe-input.last |grep -v pe-warn.last -fprint /home/myuser/pengine_older_than_720days.txt
[root@smtp1: ~ ]# less /home/myuser/pengine_older_than_720days.txt


Once reviewing commands I've used below command to delete the files you can run below command do delete all older than 2 years that are different from pe-error.last / pe-input.last / pre-warn.last which might be needed for proper cluster operation.

[root@smtp1: ~ ]#  for i in $(find . -type f -mtime +720 -exec echo '{}' \;|grep -v pe-error.last | grep -v pe-input.last |grep -v pe-warn.last); do echo $i; done


Another approach to the situation is to simply review all the files inside /var/lib/pengine and delete files based on year of creation, for example to delete all files in /var/lib/pengine from 2010, you can run something like:
 

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# for i in $(ls -al|grep -i ' 2010 ' | awk '{ print $9 }' |grep -v 'pe-warn.last'); do rm -f $i; done


4. Monitor real time inodes freeing

While doing the clerance of old unnecessery pengine heartbeat archives you can open another ssh console to the server and view how the inodes gets freed up with a command like:

 

# check if inodes is not being rapidly decreased

[root@csmtp1: ~ ]# watch 'df -i'


5. Restart basic Linux services producing pid files and logs etc. to make then workable (some services might not be notified the inodes on the Hard drive are freed up)

Because the hard drive on the system was full some services started to misbehaving and /var/log logging was impacted so I had to also restart them in our case this is the heartbeat itself
that  checks clusters nodes availability as well as the logging daemon service rsyslog

 

# restart rsyslog and heartbeat services
[root@csmtp1: ~ ]# /etc/init.d/heartbeat restart
[root@csmtp1: ~ ]# /etc/init.d/rsyslog restart

The systems had been a data integrity legacy service samhain so I had to restart this service as well to reforce the /var/log/samhain log file to again continusly start writting data to HDD.

# Restart samhain service init script 
[root@csmtp1: ~ ]# /etc/init.d/samhain restart


6. Check up enough inodes are freed up with df

[root@smtp1 log]# df -i
Filesystem Inodes IUsed IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/simfs 500000 410531 19469 91% /
none 65536 61 65475 1% /dev


I had to repeat the same process on the second Postfix cluster node smtp2, and after all the steps like below check the status of smtp2 node and the postfix queue, following same procedure made the second smtp2 cluster member as expected 🙂

 

7. Check the cluster node quorum is complete, e.g. postfix cluster is operating normally

 

# Test if email cluster is ok with pacemaker resource cluster manager – lt-crm_mon
 

[root@csmtp1: ~ ]# crm_mon -1
============
Last updated: Tue Aug 10 18:10:48 2021
Stack: Heartbeat
Current DC: smtp2.fqdn.com (bfb3d029-89a8-41f6-a9f0-52d377cacd83) – partition with quorum
Version: 1.0.12-unknown
2 Nodes configured, unknown expected votes
4 Resources configured.
============

Online: [ smtp2.fqdn.com smtp1.fqdn.com ]

failover-ip (ocf::heartbeat:IPaddr2): Started csmtp1.ikossvan.de
Clone Set: postfix_clone
Started: [ smtp2.fqdn.com smtp1fqdn.com ]
Clone Set: pingd_clone
Started: [ smtp2.fqdn.com smtp1.fqdn.com ]
Clone Set: mailto_clone
Started: [ smtp2.fqdn.com smtp1.fqdn.com ]

 

8.  Force resend a few hundred thousands of emails left in the email queue


After some inodes gets freed up due to the file deletion, i've reforced a couple of times the queued mail servers to be immediately resent to remote mail destinations with cmd:

 

# force emails in queue to be resend with postfix

[root@smtp1: ~ ]# sendmail -q


– It was useful to watch in real time how the queued emails are quickly decreased (queued mails are successfully sent to destination addresses) with:

 

# Monitor  the decereasing size of the email queue
[root@smtp1: ~ ]# watch 'postqueue -p|grep -i '@'|wc -l'

Linux: logrotate fix log file permissions on newly created logs after rotation

Monday, July 5th, 2021

fix logrotate permission issues of newly logrotated files, howto chown chmod logrotate linux logo

If you have to administer a bunch of Web or Application servers you will definetely end up with some machines that has some logrotate misconfiguration.

Perhaps the most common one sysadmin faces is when you have rotated webserver, proxy, mail server logs that gets gzipped with a date timestamp of the rotation and a brand new files is created by logrotate. Such a thing could be seen on various Linux distributions and even a more corporate prodcution ready Linux – es like CentOS and Fedora occasionally end up with issues caused by improperly created user / group permissions (usually root:root) of logrotate. 

The wrong permissions of usually normally logging to file by a service, happens when the log file will get filled (or matches some thresholds) configured by logrotate respective config, the log rotate mechanism will rename this file gzip / bzip it depending on how it is prepared to behave and opens a new one, however the newly produced log file will not have the  read write  permission which are necessery for the respective service because the service is not running as administrator (root), lets say there is a haproxy daemon running with user / group haproxy, haproxy, like it happeed today on one of our legacy CentOS 6.5 servers.

The sad result is /var/log/haproxy.log or whatever log file stays empty forever even though the service is normally working and you end up blind not seeing what's going on …

To solve the empty file due to logrotate dumping the original file permissions to a wrong one due to misconfiguration or a lack of special configuration it is as easy as setting up the logrotated file to write down the new rotated file to a specic user, this is done with a one line addition of code with a syntax like:

create mode owner group

Below is extract from logrotate man page (man logrotate)

Immediately after rotation (before the postrotate script is run) the log file is created (with the same name as the log file just rotated).  mode  specifies the mode for the log file in octal (the same as chmod(2)), owner specifies the user name who will own the log file, and group specifies the group the log file will belong to. Any of the log file attributes may be omitted, in which case those attributes for the new file will use the same values as the original log file for the omitted attributes. This option can be disabled using the nocreate option.

 Lets say you have following /etc/logrotate.d/haproxy configuration that is instructing logrotate to do the rotation and this will create empty file with root:root after rotate:

root@haproxy2:/etc/logrotate.d# cat haproxy

/var/log/haproxy.log {
    daily
    rotate 52
    missingok
    notifempty
    compress
    delaycompress
    postrotate
        /usr/lib/rsyslog/rsyslog-rotate
    endscript
}

To make /var/log/haproxy.log be owned by haproxy user and group and chmod to certain owner permissions hence, do add inside the block something like: 

 

/var/log/haproxy.log {
….
        create 664 user group
….
}


i.e. :

/var/log/haproxy.log {
….
        create 644 haproxy hapoxy
….
}

To test the configuration do a logrotate config dry run do:

root@haproxy2:/etc/logrotate.d# logrotate -v -d -f /etc/logrotate.d/haproxy
WARNING: logrotate in debug mode does nothing except printing debug messages!  Consider using verbose mode (-v) instead if this is not what you want.

reading config file /etc/logrotate.d/haproxy
Reading state from file: /var/lib/logrotate/status
Allocating hash table for state file, size 64 entries
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state
Creating new state

 

Handling 1 logs

rotating pattern: /var/log/haproxy.log  forced from command line (52 rotations)
empty log files are not rotated, old logs are removed
considering log /var/log/haproxy.log
  Now: 2021-07-05 21:51
  Last rotated at 2021-07-05 00:00
  log needs rotating
rotating log /var/log/haproxy.log, log->rotateCount is 52
dateext suffix '-20210705'
glob pattern '-[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]'
compressing log with: /bin/gzip

renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.8.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.9.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 8),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.7.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.8.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 7),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.6.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.7.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 6),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.5.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.6.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 5),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.4.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.5.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 4),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.3.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.4.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 3),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.2.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.3.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 2),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.1.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.2.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 1),
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log.0.gz to /var/log/haproxy.log.1.gz (rotatecount 52, logstart 1, i 0),
log /var/log/haproxy.log.53.gz doesn't exist — won't try to dispose of it
renaming /var/log/haproxy.log to /var/log/haproxy.log.1
creating new /var/log/haproxy.log mode = 0644 uid = 106 gid = 112
running postrotate script
running script with arg /var/log/haproxy.log: "
        /usr/lib/rsyslog/rsyslog-rotate
"

 

 

root@haproxy2:/etc/logrotate.d# grep -Ei '106|112' /etc/passwd
haproxy:x:106:112::/var/lib/haproxy:/usr/sbin/nologin

You do it for any other service respectively by editting whatever /etc/logrotate.d/file, lets say postfix's /var/log/maillog should be owned with 644 by postfix:postfix.
 

# cat /etc/logrotate/postfix
/var/log/maillog {
….
        create 664 postfix postfix
….
}

Stop haproxy log requests to /var/log/messages / Disable haproxy double logging

Friday, June 25th, 2021

haproxy-logo

On a CentOS Linux release 7.9.2009 (Core) I've running haproxies on two KVM virtual machines that are configured in a High Avaialability cluster with Corosync and Pacemaker, the machines are inherited from another admin (I did not install the servers hardware) and OS but have been received the system for support.
The old sysadmins seems to not care much about the system so they've left the haprxoy with Double logging one time under separate configured log in /var/log/haproxy/haproxyprod.log and each Haproxy TCP mode flown request has been double logged to /var/log/messages as well. As you can guess this shouldn't be so because we're wasting Hard drive space so to fix that I had to stop haproxy doble logging to /var/log/messages.

The logging is done under a separate local pointer local6 the /etc/haproxy/haproxyprod.cfg goes as follows:
 

[root@haproxy01 ~]# cat /etc/haproxy/haproxyprod.cfg

global
    # log <address> [len ] [max level [min level]]
    log 127.0.0.1 local6 debug

 

The logging is handled by rsyslog via the local6, so obviously to keep out the logging from /var/log/messages
The logging to the separate log file configuration in rsyslog is as follows:

local6.*                                                /var/log/haproxy/haproxyprod.log

It turned to be really easy to prevent haproxy get its requests log to /var/log/messages all I had to change is under /etc/rsyslogd.conf

local6.none config has to be placed for /var/log/messages the full line configuration in /etc/rsyslog.conf that stopped double logging is:

# Don't log private authentication messages!
*.info;mail.none;authpriv.none;cron.none;local5.none;local6.none                /var/log/messages