Posts Tagged ‘pcfreak’

Howto Pass SSH traffic through a Secured Corporate Proxy server with corkscrew, using sshd as a standalone proxy service with no proxy installed on remote Linux server or VPS

Tuesday, November 19th, 2019

howto pass ssh traffic through proxy to remote server use remote machine as a proxy for connecting to the Internet

Working in the big bad corporate world (being employed in  any of the Fortune 500) companies, especially in an IT delivery company is a nasty thing in terms of User Personal Data Privacy because usually when employeed in any of a corporation, the company ships you with a personal Computer with some kind of pre-installed OS (most often this is Windows) and the computer is not a standalone one but joined in Active Directory (AD) belonging to Windows Domain and centrally administered by whoever.

As part of the default deplyed configuration in this pre-installed OS and software is that part or all your network traffic and files is being monitored in some kind of manner as your pre-installed Windows or Linux notebook given by the Corporation is having a set of standard software running in the background, and even though you have Windows Administrator there are many things you have zero control or even if you have changed it once the Domain Policy is triggered your custom made changes / Installed Programs that happen to be against the company policy are being automatically deleted, any registry changes made are being rewinded etc. Sometimes even by trying to manually clean up your PC from the corporate crapware,  you might breaks access to the corporate DMZ firewalled network. A common way to secure their employee PC data large companies have a Network seperation, your PC when not connected to the Corporate VPN is having a certain IP configuration and once connected to the Demilitarized Zone VPN those configuration changes and the PC have access to internal company infrastructure servers / router / switches / firewalls / SANs etc. Access to corporate Infrastructure is handled via crypted VPN clinet such as Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client which is perhaps one of the most used ones out there.

Part of the common software installed to Monitor your PC for threats / viruses / trojans among which is MCafee / EMET (Enhandced Mitigation Experience Toolkit) the PC is often prebundled with some kind of anti-malware (crapware) :). But the tip of the iceberg on user surveillance where most of surveillance happens is the default installed proxy on the PC which usually does keep track of all your remote accessed HTTP Website URLs accessed in plain text – traffic flowing on Port 80 and crypted one on standard (SSL) Port 443. This Web Traffic is handled by the Central Corporate proxy that is being deployed via some kind of Domain policy, every time the Computer joins the Windows domain. 

This of course is a terrible thing for your Browsing security and together with the good security practice to run your browser in Incognito mode, which makes all your browsing activity such as access URLs History or Saved Cookies data to be cleared up on a Browser close it is important to make sure you run your own personal traffic via a separate browser which you will use only for your own concern browsing such as Accessing your Bank Money Accounts to check your Monthly Sallary / Purchase things online via Amazon.com / Ebay.com, whether all of the rest traffic company related is trafficed via the default set corporate central proxy.
This is relatively easy sometimes in companies, where security is not of a top concern but in corporations with tightened security accessing remote proxy, or accessing even common daily news and Public Email websites or social media sites  Gmail.com / Twitter / Youtube will be filtered so the only way to reach them will be via some kind of Proxy and often this proxy is the only way out to the Free world from the corporate jail.

Here is where the good old SSH comes as a saving grace as it turns out SSH traffic could be trafficed over a proxy. In below article I will give you a short insight on how Proxy through SSH could be achieved to Secure your dailty web traffic and use SSH to reach your own server on the Internet as well as how you can copy securely data via SSH through corporate Proxy. 
 

1. How to view your corporate used (default) proxy / Check Proxy.pac file definitions

 

To get an idea what is the used proxy on your Corporate PC (as most corporate employee given notebooks are running some kind of M$ Windows)  you can go to:

Windows Control Panel -> Internet Options -> Connections -> Lan Settings


internet-properties-microsoft-windows-screenshot

Under the field Proxy server (check out the Proxy configured Address and Port number )

local-area-network-lan-settings-screenshot-windows-1
 

Having that as browsers venerate the so-called Proxy.pac file, to be rawly aware on some general Company Proxy configured definitions you can access in a browser the proxy itself fething the proxy.pac file for example.

 

http://your-corporate-firewall-rpoxy-url:8080/proxy.pac

 

This is helpful as some companies Proxies have some proxy rules that reveal some things about its Internet architecture and even some have some badly configured proxy.pac files which could be used to fool the proxy under some circumstances 🙂
 

2. Few of the reasons corporations proxy all their employee's work PC web traffic

 

The corporate proxying of traffic has a number of goals, some of which are good hearted and others are for mostly spying on the users.

 

1. Protect Corporate Employees from malicious Viruses / Trojans Horses / Malware / Badware / Whatever ware – EXCELLENT
2. Prevent users from acessing a set of sources that due to the corporate policy are considered harmful (e.g. certain addresses 
of information or disinformation of competitors, any Internet source that might preach against the corporation, hacking ralated websites etc.) – NOT GOOD (for the employee / user) and GOOD for the company
3.Spy on the users activity and be able to have evidence against the employee in case he decided to do anything harmful to the company evidences from proxy could even later be used in court if some kind of corpoate infringment occurs due to misbehave of the employee. – PERFECT FOR COMPANY and Complete breach of User privacy and IMHO totally against European Union privacy legislation such as GDRP
4. In companies that are into the field of Aritificial Intelligence / Users behavior could even be used to advance Self-learning bots and mechanisms – NASTY ! YAECKES

 

3. Run SSH Socks proxy to remote SSHd server running on common SSL 443 port

 

Luckily sysadmins who were ordered the big bosses to sniff on your Web behaviour and preferences could be outsmarted with some hacks.

To protect your Browsing behaviours and Secure your privacy perhaps the best option is to use the Old but gold practice o Securing your Networkf traffic using SSH Over Proxy and SSH Dynamic tunnel as a Proxy as explained in my previous article here.

how-to-use-sshd-server-as-a-proxy-without-a-real-proxy-ssh-socks5_proxy_linux
 

In short the quest way to have your free of charge SOCKS  Remote proxy to your Home based Linux installed OS server / VPN with a Public Internet address is to use ssh as so:

 

ssh -D 3128 UserName@IP-of-Remote-SSHD-Host -p 443

 

This will start the SOCKS Proxy tunnel from Corporate Work PC to your Own Home brew server.

For some convenience it is useful to set up an .alias (for cygwin) / linux users in .bashrc file:

 

alias proxy='ssh -D 3128 UserName@IP-of-Remote-SSHD-Host -p 443';

 

To start using the Proxy from browser, I use a plugin called FoxyProxy in Chrome and Firefox browsers
set-up to connect to localhost – 127.0.0.1:3128 for All Protocols as a SOCKs v5 Proxy.

The sshd Socks proxy can be used for multiple others for example, using it you can also pass on traffic from Mail client such as Thunderbird to your Email server if you're behind a firewall prohibiting access to the common POP3 port 110 or IMAP port TCP 143. 

4. How to access SSH through Proxy using jumphost SSH hop


If you're like me and you have on your Home Linux machine only one Internet address and you have already setupped an SSL enabled service (lets say Webmail) to listen to that Public Internet IP and you don't have the possibility to run another instance of /usr/bin/sshd on port 443 via configuration or manually one time by issuing:

 

/usr/sbin/sshd -p 443

 

Then you can use another ssh another Linux server as a jump host to your own home Linux sshd server. This can be done even by purchasing a cheap VPS server for lets say 3 dollars month etc. or even better if you have a friend with another Linux home server, you can ask him to run you sshd on TCP port 443 and add you an ssh account.
Once you have the second Linux machine as JumpHost to reach out to your own machine use:

 

ssh -J Your-User@Your-jump-host.com:443 hipo@your-home-server.com -v

 

To easify this a bit long line it is handy to use some kind of alias like:

 

alias sshhome='ssh -J Your-User@Your-jump-host.com:443 hipo@your-home-server.com -v'

 

The advantage here is just by issuing this sshd tunnel and keeping it open in a terminal or setting it up as Plink Putty tunnel you have all your Web Traffic Secured
between your Work Corporate PC and your Home Brew Server, keeping the curious eyes of your Company Security Officers from your own Web traffic, hence
separating the corporate privacy from your own personal privacy. Using the just established own SSH Proxy Tunnel to home for your non-work stuff browsing habits
from the corporate systems which are accessed by switching with a button click in FoxyProxy to default proxy settings.
 

5. How to get around paranoid corporate setup where only remote access to Corporate proxy on TCP Port 80 and TCP 443 is available in Browser only

 

Using straight ssh and to create Proxy will work in most of the cases but it requires SSH access to your remote SSH running server / VPS on TCP Port 22, however under some Fort-Nox like financial involved institutions and companies for the sake of tightened security, it is common that all Outbound TCP Ports are prohibited except TCP Port 80 and SSL 443 as prior said, so what can you do then to get around this badful firewall and access the Internet via your own server Proxy? 
The hack to run SSH server either on tcp port 80 or tcp port 443 on remote Host and use 443 / 80 to acess SSHD should work, but then even for the most paranoid corporations the ones who are PCI Compliant – PCI stands for (Payment Card Industry), e.g. works with Debit and Credit Card data etc, accessing even 80 or 443  ports with something like telnet client or netcat will be impossible. 
Once connected to the corporate VPN,  this 2 two ports firewall exceptions will be only accessible via the Corporate Proxy server defined in a Web Browser (Firefox / IE / Chrome etc.) as prior explained in article.

The remedy here is to use a 3rd party tools such as httptunnel or corkscrew that  are able to TUNNEL SSH TRAFFIC VIA CORPORATE PROXY SERVER and access your own resource out of the DMZ.

Both httptunnel and corkscrew are installable both on most Linux distros or for Windows users via CygWin for those who use MobaXterm.

Just to give you better idea on what corkscrew and (hts) httptunnel does, here is Debian packages descriptions.

# apt-cache show​ corkscrew
" corkscrew is a simple tool to tunnel TCP connections through an HTTP
 proxy supporting the CONNECT method. It reads stdin and writes to
 stdout during the connection, just like netcat.
 .
 It can be used for instance to connect to an SSH server running on
 a remote 443 port through a strict HTTPS proxy.
"

 

# apt-cache show httptunnel|grep -i description -A 7
Description-en: Tunnels a data stream in HTTP requests
 Creates a bidirectional virtual data stream tunnelled in
 HTTP requests. The requests can be sent via a HTTP proxy
 if so desired.
 .
 This can be useful for users behind restrictive firewalls. If WWW
 access is allowed through a HTTP proxy, it's possible to use
 httptunnel and, say, telnet or PPP to connect to a computer

Description-md5: ed96b7d53407ae311a6c5ef2eb229c3f
Homepage: http://www.nocrew.org/software/httptunnel.html
Tag: implemented-in::c, interface::commandline, interface::daemon,
 network::client, network::server, network::vpn, protocol::http,
 role::program, suite::gnu, use::routing
Section: net
Priority: optional
Filename: pool/main/h/httptunnel/httptunnel_3.3+dfsg-4_amd64.deb

Windows cygwin users can install the tools with:
 

apt-cyg install –yes corkscrew httptunnel


Linux users respectively with:

apt-get install –yes corkscrew httptunnel

or 

yum install -y corkscrew httptunnel

 

You will then need to have the following configuration in your user home directory $HOME/.ssh/config file
 

Host host-addrs-of-remote-home-ssh-server.com
ProxyCommand /usr/bin/corkscrew your-corporate-firewall-rpoxy-url 8080 %h %p

 

howto-transfer-ssh-traffic-over-proxy

Picture Copyright by Daniel Haxx

The best picture on how ssh traffic is proxied is the one found on Daniel Haxx's website which is a great quick tutorial which originally helped to get the idea of how corkscrew works in proxying traffic I warmly recommend you take a quick look at his SSH Through or over Proxy article.

Host-addrs-of-remote-home-ssh-server.com could be also and IP if you don't have your own domain name in case if using via some cheap VPN Linux server with SSH, or alternatively
if you don't want to spend money on buying domain for SSH server (assuming you don't have such yet) you can use Dyn DNS or NoIP.

Another thing is to setup the proper http_proxy / https_proxy / ftp_proxy variable exports in $HOME/.bashrc in my setup I have the following:
 

export ftp_proxy="http://your-corporate-firewall-rpoxy-url:8080"
export https_proxy="https://your-corporate-firewall-rpoxy-url:8080"
export http_proxy="http://your-corporate-firewall-rpoxy-url:8080"
export HTTP_PROXY="http://your-corporate-firewall-rpoxy-url:8080"
export HTTPS_PROXY="http://your-corporate-firewall-rpoxy-url:8080"


 

6. How to Transfer Files / Data via SSH Protocol through  Proxy with SCP and SFTP


Next logical question is how to Transfer your own personal encrypted files (that contains no corporate sensitive information) between your Work laptop and home brew Linux ssh server or cheap VPN.

It took me quite a lot of try-outs until finally I got it how Secure Copy (scp) command can be used toto transfer files between my Work Computer and my Home brew server using JumpHost, here is how:
 

scp -o 'ProxyJump Username@Jumpt-Host-or-IP.com:443' ~/file-or-files-to-copy* Username@home-ssh-server.com:/path/where/to/copy/files


I love using sftp (Secure FTP) command Linux client to copy files and rarely use scp so I have a lot of try-outs to connect interacitvely via the Corporate Proxy server over a Jump-Host:443 to my Destination home machine, 

 

I've tried using netcat as it was pointed in many articles online, like so to traffic my sftp traffic via my localhost binded SSH Socks proxy on :3128 together with netcat as shown in article prior example, using following line:
 

sftp -oProxyCommand='/bin/nc -X connect -x 127.0.0.1:3128 %h %p' Username@home-ssh-server.com 22

 

Also tried proxy connect like this:

 

sftp -o ProxyCommand="proxy-connect -h localhost -p 3128 %h %p" Username@home-ssh-server.com

 

Moreover, tried to use the ssh  command (-s) argument capability to invoke SSH protocol subsystem feature which is used to facilitiate use of SSH secure transport for other application
 

ssh -v -J hipo@Jump-Host:443 -s sftp root@home-ssh-server.com -v

open failed: administratively prohibited: open failed

 

Finally decided to give a try to the same options arguments as in scp and thanks God it worked and I can even access via the Corporate Proxy through the Jump Host SSH interactively via Secure FTP 🙂

!! THE FINAL WORKING SFTP THROUGH PROXY VIA SSH JUMPHOST !!
 

sftp -o 'ProxyJump Username@Jumpt-Host-or-IP.com:443' Username@home-ssh-server.com


To save time from typing this long line every time, I've setup the following alias to ~/.bashrc
 

alias sftphome='sftp -o 'ProxyJump Username@Jumpt-Host-or-IP.com:443' Username@home-ssh-server.com'

 

Conclusion

Of course using own Proxy via your Home brew SSH Machine as well as transferring your data securely from your Work PC (notebook) to Home does not completely make you Surveillance free, as the Corporate Windows installed OS image is perhaps prebundled with its own integrated Keylogger as well as the Windows Domain administrators have certainly access to connect to your PC and run various commands, so this kind of Security is just an attempt to make company has less control and know less on your browsing habits and the best solution where possible to secure your privacy and separate your Personal Space form Work space by using a second computer (if having the ability to work from home) with a KVM Switch device and switch over your Work PC and Home PC via it or in some cases (where companies) allows it, setup something like VNC server (TightVNC / RealVNC) on work PC and leave it all time running in office and connect remotely with vncviewer from your own controlled secured computer.

In article I've explained shortly common scenario found in corporate Work computers proxy setup, designed to Surveil all your move, mentioned few common softwares running by default to protect from Viruses and aimed to Protect user from malicious hacking tools, explained how to view your work notebook configured Proxy, shortly mentioned on Proxy.pac and hinted how to view proxy.pac config as well as gave few of the reasons why all web traffic is being routed over central proxy.

That's all folks, Enjoy the Freedom to be less surveilled !

Display Content of SSL certificate .pem file with openssl command

Thursday, October 11th, 2018

display-content-of-pem-der-and-scr-file-how-to-view-pem-file-linux

If you have generated a .pem formatted SSL certificate or you have multiple .pem SSL certificates and you're not sure which .pem file is generated for which domain / subdomain it is useful to Display content of SSL Certificate .PEM file with openssl command.

Viewing certificate's content is also very useful if you have hosted multiple websites hosted on a server and you want to check which of the SSLs assigned in the Virtualhosts has Expired (for example if you have domains that expire in short term period (365 days).


1. How to Display Content of SSL certificate .pem file?

 

root@pcfreak:~# openssl x509 -in cert.pem -text
Certificate:
    Data:
        Version: 3 (0x2)
        Serial Number:
            04:d1:ad:55:91:f3:f9:ef:3e:53:ea:2c:3a:f4:5f:e6:ce:c1
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
        Issuer: C = US, O = Let's Encrypt, CN = Let's Encrypt Authority X3
        Validity
            Not Before: Oct 10 17:49:34 2018 GMT
            Not After : Jan  8 17:49:34 2019 GMT
        Subject: CN = mail.pc-freak.net

        Subject Public Key Info:
            Public Key Algorithm: rsaEncryption
                Public-Key: (2048 bit)
                Modulus:
                    00:bb:b0:c9:1c:83:82:61:47:f9:c2:73:60:c0:48:
                    e6:0c:f2:a1:ff:db:ae:f1:84:17:14:5d:fc:a3:b2:
                    e4:00:3a:d1:85:42:90:da:41:a9:e9:a8:af:20:3d:
                    12:ef:8e:ca:61:a1:71:f2:cc:43:bf:40:0d:fa:08:
                    7d:d9:61:2b:ea:5d:30:e0:52:43:db:18:30:92:0c:
                    2c:ce:87:93:84:ea:91:61:b7:70:db:11:7c:b6:a4:
                    33:de:d8:3f:d6:61:47:42:f2:36:12:7f:3d:e3:f7:
                    5b:11:3e:1c:f0:af:96:cd:61:8a:1a:a0:f0:b5:23:
                    65:73:b6:b4:9c:19:a7:09:dd:43:96:37:ac:48:fc:
                    21:07:02:52:67:26:2c:81:24:f4:d7:10:e6:f4:12:
                    69:53:ef:91:2a:15:6a:21:06:22:ea:fe:31:38:82:
                    b4:5a:b5:9b:67:90:16:b8:31:e8:27:38:f2:41:b9:
                    19:02:8f:c7:6e:e1:2c:84:75:19:6d:bb:30:3b:d2:
                    02:f0:65:f1:76:82:15:9c:ce:31:3a:d4:7c:83:ca:
                    d1:f9:e1:b7:76:f6:78:93:47:d2:00:f9:63:aa:94:
                    41:d4:78:d0:ee:bc:e6:e9:14:14:e4:ae:54:31:88:
                    f8:58:8d:7b:3e:9f:87:5c:f2:04:e5:07:e0:4c:9a:
                    81:eb
                Exponent: 65537 (0x10001)
        X509v3 extensions:
            X509v3 Key Usage: critical
                Digital Signature, Key Encipherment
            X509v3 Extended Key Usage:
                TLS Web Server Authentication, TLS Web Client Authentication
            X509v3 Basic Constraints: critical
                CA:FALSE
            X509v3 Subject Key Identifier:
                DB:AB:81:E3:14:5F:6D:BE:B4:78:7B:5E:7D:FB:66:BF:56:37:C5:1D
            X509v3 Authority Key Identifier:
                keyid:A8:4A:6A:63:04:7D:DD:BA:E6:D1:39:B7:A6:45:65:EF:F3:A8:EC:A1

 

            Authority Information Access:
                OCSP – URI:http://ocsp.int-x3.letsencrypt.org
                CA Issuers – URI:http://cert.int-x3.letsencrypt.org/

            X509v3 Subject Alternative Name:
                DNS:mail.pc-freak.net
            X509v3 Certificate Policies:
                Policy: 2.23.140.1.2.1
                Policy: 1.3.6.1.4.1.44947.1.1.1
                  CPS: http://cps.letsencrypt.org
                  User Notice:
                    Explicit Text: This Certificate may only be relied upon by Relying Parties and only in accordance with the Certificate Policy found at https://letsencrypt.org/repository/

            CT Precertificate SCTs:
                Signed Certificate Timestamp:
                    Version   : v1 (0x0)
                    Log ID    : E2:69:4B:AE:26:E8:E9:40:09:E8:86:1B:B6:3B:83:D4:
                                3E:E7:FE:74:88:FB:A4:8F:28:93:01:9D:DD:F1:DB:FE
                    Timestamp : Oct 10 18:49:34.453 2018 GMT
                    Extensions: none
                    Signature : ecdsa-with-SHA256
                                30:46:02:21:00:D6:DE:47:AD:D2:32:BE:BE:DD:B3:EB:
                                EE:84:9E:02:8A:4F:33:E2:63:21:D5:F7:4D:47:82:92:
                                AB:B9:0A:49:62:02:21:00:E8:7D:17:81:32:E3:4F:CF:
                                2D:79:8C:97:46:E1:EF:5E:99:F4:8A:8B:B5:6D:23:5F:
                                05:84:E2:14:6A:56:8E:A0
                Signed Certificate Timestamp:
                    Version   : v1 (0x0)
                    Log ID    : 29:3C:51:96:54:C8:39:65:BA:AA:50:FC:58:07:D4:B7:
                                6F:BF:58:7A:29:72:DC:A4:C3:0C:F4:E5:45:47:F4:78
                    Timestamp : Oct 10 18:49:34.451 2018 GMT
                    Extensions: none
                    Signature : ecdsa-with-SHA256
                                30:44:02:20:6C:8E:E7:E2:70:AD:33:A6:5C:E0:89:84:
                                FB:0B:F6:E1:5C:05:06:0A:A8:DB:8B:1C:7A:D0:52:99:
                                5F:3F:A2:64:02:20:4B:CD:0B:E7:A0:27:04:31:19:18:
                                58:99:51:73:49:6B:77:25:A7:E7:5B:10:8C:BD:ED:54:
                                03:DD:40:E4:2D:31
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
         9c:86:b3:34:64:af:ac:9d:c4:d3:a7:cc:fc:8a:32:18:75:95:
         95:47:9b:9c:3c:0e:3b:61:f9:88:61:38:1a:a6:92:69:3d:14:
         6a:53:13:14:65:e6:ca:fa:b9:8e:48:c9:d4:73:f6:e4:74:8a:
         1f:2b:f2:14:86:f1:18:55:26:1b:a0:97:89:15:0b:62:c6:2b:
         27:81:6f:60:af:55:68:b3:2c:5b:10:56:a2:7d:28:cb:8e:fc:
         f0:21:65:78:9b:3a:52:d3:9d:27:ff:d7:24:95:de:0f:d8:3d:
         a2:43:6e:fc:a5:2d:f2:ad:37:e9:ea:db:b5:75:b8:7c:ad:23:
         45:1d:bd:fe:4e:36:c7:f4:e2:3d:47:c9:06:fc:cb:75:ba:d4:
         0a:90:17:ea:e1:7f:49:e6:68:27:97:8a:70:c7:50:e9:19:4a:
         8a:21:18:26:79:a3:61:ff:1b:26:9e:fe:85:8f:20:ed:c6:4d:
         c1:0e:04:21:a8:05:d4:29:69:99:53:63:81:c7:d5:58:71:df:
         02:b5:94:c9:36:48:c9:35:80:ab:71:78:d9:12:f6:f5:10:25:
         3d:38:c5:40:75:25:b1:95:18:d8:1c:96:f1:c6:1a:d2:c4:99:
         f5:01:2e:f4:e1:4a:1f:10:42:0e:34:ed:92:8e:53:9f:c2:7b:
         11:51:78:6a
—–BEGIN CERTIFICATE—–
MIIGDTCCBPWgAwIBAgISBNGtVZHz+e8+U+osOvRf5s7BMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUA
MEoxCzAJBgNVBAYTAlVTMRYwFAYDVQQKEw1MZXQncyBFbmNyeXB0MSMwIQYDVQQD
ExpMZXQncyBFbmNyeXB0IEF1dGhvcml0eSBYMzAeFw0xODEwMTAxNzQ5MzRaFw0x
OTAxMDgxNzQ5MzRaMBwxGjAYBgNVBAMTEW1haWwucGMtZnJlYWsubmV0MIIBIjAN
BgkqhkiG9w0BAQEFAAOCAQ8AMIIBCgKCAQEAu7DJHIOCYUf5wnNgwEjmDPKh/9uu
8YQXFF38o7LkADrRhUKQ2kGp6aivID0S747KYaFx8sxDv0AN+gh92WEr6l0w4FJD
2xgwkgwszoeThOqRYbdw2xF8tqQz3tg/1mFHQvI2En894/dbET4c8K+WzWGKGqDw
tSNlc7a0nBmnCd1DljesSPwhBwJSZyYsgST01xDm9BJpU++RKhVqIQYi6v4xOIK0
WrWbZ5AWuDHoJzjyQbkZAo/HbuEshHUZbbswO9IC8GXxdoIVnM4xOtR8g8rR+eG3
dvZ4k0fSAPljqpRB1HjQ7rzm6RQU5K5UMYj4WI17Pp+HXPIE5QfgTJqB6wIDAQAB
o4IDGTCCAxUwDgYDVR0PAQH/BAQDAgWgMB0GA1UdJQQWMBQGCCsGAQUFBwMBBggr
BgEFBQcDAjAMBgNVHRMBAf8EAjAAMB0GA1UdDgQWBBTbq4HjFF9tvrR4e159+2a/
VjfFHTAfBgNVHSMEGDAWgBSoSmpjBH3duubRObemRWXv86jsoTBvBggrBgEFBQcB
AQRjMGEwLgYIKwYBBQUHMAGGImh0dHA6Ly9vY3NwLmludC14My5sZXRzZW5jcnlw
dC5vcmcwLwYIKwYBBQUHMAKGI2h0dHA6Ly9jZXJ0LmludC14My5sZXRzZW5jcnlw
dC5vcmcvMBwGA1UdEQQVMBOCEW1haWwucGMtZnJlYWsubmV0MIH+BgNVHSAEgfYw
gfMwCAYGZ4EMAQIBMIHmBgsrBgEEAYLfEwEBATCB1jAmBggrBgEFBQcCARYaaHR0
cDovL2Nwcy5sZXRzZW5jcnlwdC5vcmcwgasGCCsGAQUFBwICMIGeDIGbVGhpcyBD
ZXJ0aWZpY2F0ZSBtYXkgb25seSBiZSByZWxpZWQgdXBvbiBieSBSZWx5aW5nIFBh
cnRpZXMgYW5kIG9ubHkgaW4gYWNjb3JkYW5jZSB3aXRoIHRoZSBDZXJ0aWZpY2F0
ZSBQb2xpY3kgZm91bmQgYXQgaHR0cHM6Ly9sZXRzZW5jcnlwdC5vcmcvcmVwb3Np
dG9yeS8wggEEBgorBgEEAdZ5AgQCBIH1BIHyAPAAdwDiaUuuJujpQAnohhu2O4PU
Puf+dIj7pI8okwGd3fHb/gAAAWZfUA/1AAAEAwBIMEYCIQDW3ket0jK+vt2z6+6E
ngKKTzPiYyHV901HgpKruQpJYgIhAOh9F4Ey40/PLXmMl0bh716Z9IqLtW0jXwWE
4hRqVo6gAHUAKTxRllTIOWW6qlD8WAfUt2+/WHopctykwwz05UVH9HgAAAFmX1AP
8wAABAMARjBEAiBsjuficK0zplzgiYT7C/bhXAUGCqjbixx60FKZXz+iZAIgS80L
56AnBDEZGFiZUXNJa3clp+dbEIy97VQD3UDkLTEwDQYJKoZIhvcNAQELBQADggEB
AJyGszRkr6ydxNOnzPyKMhh1lZVHm5w8Djth+YhhOBqmkmk9FGpTExRl5sr6uY5I
ydRz9uR0ih8r8hSG8RhVJhugl4kVC2LGKyeBb2CvVWizLFsQVqJ9KMuO/PAhZXib
OlLTnSf/1ySV3g/YPaJDbvylLfKtN+nq27V1uHytI0Udvf5ONsf04j1HyQb8y3W6
1AqQF+rhf0nmaCeXinDHUOkZSoohGCZ5o2H/Gyae/oWPIO3GTcEOBCGoBdQpaZlT
Y4HH1Vhx3wK1lMk2SMk1gKtxeNkS9vUQJT04xUB1JbGVGNgclvHGGtLEmfUBLvTh
Sh8QQg407ZKOU5/CexFReGo=
—–END CERTIFICATE—–

 

Same way a .der files content / encryption algorithm and domain name could be grasped.
 

root@pcfreak:~# openssl x509 -in cert.der -inform der -text
Certificate:
    Data:
        Version: 3 (0x2)
        Serial Number:
            ad:c2:96:6f:4b:db:31:5c
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
        Issuer: CN = example.com
        Validity
            Not Before: Jun 22 04:00:37 2015 GMT
            Not After : Jul 22 04:00:37 2015 GMT

        Subject: CN = example.com
        Subject Public Key Info:
            Public Key Algorithm: rsaEncryption
                Public-Key: (512 bit)

                Modulus:
                    00:ac:75:73:b4:51:ed:1f:dd:ae:70:52:43:fc:df:
                    c7:5b:d0:2c:75:1b:14:b8:75:01:04:10:e5:1f:03:
                    65:45:dd:df:a7:9f:34:ae:fd:be:e9:05:84:df:47:
                    16:81:d9:89:4b:ce:8e:6d:1c:fa:95:44:e8:af:84:
                    74:4f:ed:c2:e5
                Exponent: 65537 (0x10001)
        X509v3 extensions:
            X509v3 Subject Key Identifier:
                26:CF:C8:ED:4B:D7:94:B2:E4:25:03:58:24:8F:04:C0:74:D5:97:8A
            X509v3 Authority Key Identifier:
                keyid:26:CF:C8:ED:4B:D7:94:B2:E4:25:03:58:24:8F:04:C0:74:D5:97:8A

 

            X509v3 Basic Constraints:
                CA:TRUE
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
         0c:8b:ff:12:80:9e:4c:90:bc:26:b0:96:20:ab:76:0c:64:71:
         d2:15:48:a5:33:f6:47:e4:03:df:76:5e:0f:cd:e1:1b:5e:d1:
         4d:c2:1f:8d:b8:63:2f:c9:7d:6e:5c:3b:cb:cd:a3:d0:d8:27:
         74:66:a3:76:06:a5:fb:81:3a:b6
—–BEGIN CERTIFICATE—–
MIIBdTCCAR+gAwIBAgIJAK3Clm9L2zFcMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUAMBYxFDASBgNV
BAMMC2V4YW1wbGUuY29tMB4XDTE1MDYyMjA0MDAzN1oXDTE1MDcyMjA0MDAzN1ow
FjEUMBIGA1UEAwwLZXhhbXBsZS5jb20wXDANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQEFAANLADBIAkEA
rHVztFHtH92ucFJD/N/HW9AsdRsUuHUBBBDlHwNlRd3fp580rv2+6QWE30cWgdmJ
S86ObRz6lUTor4R0T+3C5QIDAQABo1AwTjAdBgNVHQ4EFgQUJs/I7UvXlLLkJQNY
JI8EwHTVl4owHwYDVR0jBBgwFoAUJs/I7UvXlLLkJQNYJI8EwHTVl4owDAYDVR0T
BAUwAwEB/zANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQsFAANBAAyL/xKAnkyQvCawliCrdgxkcdIVSKUz
9kfkA992Xg/N4Rte0U3CH424Yy/JfW5cO8vNo9DYJ3Rmo3YGpfuBOrY=
—–END CERTIFICATE—–

 

2. How to display content and info about .CSR (Certificate Signing request)

 

root@pcfreak:~# openssl req -in cert.csr -noout -text
 

Certificate Request:
    Data:
        Version: 1 (0x0)
        Subject: C = BG, ST = BG, L = Dobrich, O = Pc Freak, CN = mail.pc-freak.net, emailAddress = hipo@pc-freak.net
        Subject Public Key Info:
            Public Key Algorithm: rsaEncryption
                Public-Key: (2048 bit)
                Modulus:
                    00:b1:83:a7:07:62:19:d4:60:95:58:49:de:b3:48:
                    a8:39:31:fa:5a:bd:2b:d6:73:94:50:36:72:74:18:
                    58:b6:27:d3:0b:26:75:15:a8:ba:1b:77:a7:c9:54:
                    96:1f:c7:8d:da:bd:c9:17:91:53:85:9e:0a:f4:71:
                    3c:fb:d6:e4:75:41:c1:95:32:e1:22:fc:7b:1f:36:
                    23:12:00:ca:37:27:d5:f9:9b:29:48:4a:51:95:d1:
                    40:d0:ea:94:51:98:98:6b:d3:d9:79:1d:a1:65:bb:
                    a9:d1:ab:c9:46:6e:03:ee:24:45:e5:f2:73:e5:f4:
                    82:4a:08:57:b1:06:52:c3:cc:42:9a:02:5b:7a:7c:
                    bd:34:d5:5f:d7:ba:ef:27:d5:3d:97:16:69:06:c7:
                    c1:06:5e:d9:07:16:3f:a3:61:50:9d:dd:ea:95:32:
                    f1:ee:93:82:48:df:20:8b:ae:d2:95:89:05:e4:3d:
                    0c:d7:e1:cf:07:ae:55:84:11:06:92:be:34:b4:a2:
                    a1:ce:07:06:bf:21:bc:80:e2:03:d2:85:b4:64:02:
                    8d:cd:d2:86:1c:49:41:52:43:a8:12:f8:ef:2c:f4:
                    be:a0:dc:ac:ea:27:3a:f9:ab:ab:27:da:28:63:1d:
                    10:5a:4f:b8:51:42:40:ae:be:c0:2d:e9:a3:5a:5a:
                    23:7f
                Exponent: 65537 (0x10001)
        Attributes:
            a0:00
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
         47:f0:54:cd:5e:46:6f:2c:cc:48:7e:85:f0:a8:96:10:ca:a3:
         15:98:77:d3:02:95:8c:67:84:e3:55:d2:0c:e8:d5:a7:ba:82:
         95:fb:ce:73:4c:bc:8f:da:85:97:0c:a8:59:32:b3:a4:af:0a:
         80:4c:78:7f:62:cd:1b:00:01:e8:51:27:9c:eb:75:29:80:e9:
         99:24:fc:86:e2:09:28:be:47:5a:1d:bf:b1:b4:c4:29:4e:6e:
         f3:70:b4:58:f8:d9:a6:63:03:8b:a1:ef:ee:6d:1a:35:33:1e:
         b2:32:25:c1:33:37:3d:46:82:37:9b:0d:4c:40:20:ae:ff:e0:
         cc:51:a2:6b:dd:74:26:d6:93:26:89:c7:76:29:13:cf:6e:5a:
         0f:7c:1b:f5:80:be:3b:6a:a3:c0:10:cd:07:1e:a2:31:8b:49:
         94:d7:63:cf:93:8d:80:03:75:4a:76:b4:cd:14:fe:96:62:61:
         6b:96:8f:c0:a5:ef:67:c7:5e:c0:a5:4b:4f:95:57:b6:43:03:
         8b:6d:10:5f:ab:f2:95:54:ba:85:8e:8b:c1:99:ea:fd:3f:5e:
         23:01:d4:27:f3:e9:20:37:c4:05:47:30:67:94:53:f0:87:27:
         48:73:57:55:f2:70:04:b1:e9:29:eb:2e:2c:9a:cc:55:f4:cc:
         a4:71:c2:5a


That's all folks 🙂

 

How to check Linux OS install date / How long ago was Linux installed

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017

If you're sysadmin who inherited a few hundreds of Linux machines from a previous admin and you're in process of investigating how things were configured by the previous administrator one of the crucial things to find out might be

How Long ago was Linux installed?

Here is how to check the Linux OS install date.

The universal way nomatter the Linux distribution is to use fullowing command:

 

root@pcfreak:~# tune2fs -l /dev/sda1 | grep 'Filesystem created:'
Filesystem created:       Thu Sep  6 21:44:22 2012

 

 

Above command assumes the Linux's root partition / is installed on /dev/sda1 however if your case is different, e.g. the primary root partition is installed on /dev/sda2 or /dev/sdb1 / dev/sdb2 etc. just place the right first partition into the command.

If primary install root partition is /dev/sdb1 for example:
 

root@pcfreak:~# tune2fs -l /dev/sdb1 | grep 'Filesystem created:'

 


To find out what is the root partition of the Linux server installed use fdisk command:

 

 

 

root@pcfreak:~# fdisk -l

 

Disk /dev/sda: 465,8 GiB, 500107862016 bytes, 976773168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x00051eda

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sda1  *         2048 965193727 965191680 460,2G 83 Linux
/dev/sda2       965195774 976771071  11575298   5,5G  5 Extended
/dev/sda5       965195776 976771071  11575296   5,5G 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Disk /dev/sdb: 111,8 GiB, 120034123776 bytes, 234441648 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

 


Other ways to check the Linux OS install date on Debian / Ubuntu / Mint etc. deb. based GNU / Linux

 


Deban based Linux distributions do create an initial /var/log/installer directory containing various install information such as hardware-summary, partition, initial installed deb packages, exact version of Linux distribution, and the way it was installed either it was installed from an ISO image, or it was network install etc.

 

root@pcfreak:~# ls -al /var/log/installer/
total 1228
drwxr-xr-x  3 root root   4096 sep  6  2012 ./
drwxr-xr-x 72 root root  12288 окт 22 06:26 ../
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root   4096 sep  6  2012 cdebconf/
-rw-r–r–  1 root root  17691 sep  6  2012 hardware-summary
-rw-r–r–  1 root root    163 sep  6  2012 lsb-release
-rw——-  1 root root 779983 sep  6  2012 partman
-rw-r–r–  1 root root  51640 sep  6  2012 status
-rw——-  1 root root 363674 sep  6  2012 syslog

 

If those directory is missing was wiped out by the previous administrator, to clear up traces of his previous work before he left job another possible way to find out exact install date is to check timestamp of /lost+found directory;
 

root@pcfreak:~# ls -ld /lost+found/
drwx—— 2 root root 16384 sep  6  2012 /lost+found//

 

Check OS Linux install date on (Fedora, CentOS, Scientific Linux, Oracle and other Redhat RPM based Distros)

 

[root@centos: ~]# rpm -qi basesystem
Name        : basesystem
Version     : 10.0
Release     : 7.el7
Architecture: noarch
Install Date: Mon 02 May 2016 19:20:58 BST
Group       : System Environment/Base
Size        : 0
License     : Public Domain
Signature   : RSA/SHA256, Tue 01 Apr 2014 14:23:16 BST, Key ID     199e2f91fd431d51
Source RPM  : basesystem-10.0-7.el7.src.rpm
Build Date  : Fri 27 Dec 2013 17:22:15 GMT
Build Host  : ppc-015.build.eng.bos.redhat.com
Relocations : (not relocatable)
Packager    : Red Hat, Inc. <http://bugzilla.redhat.com/bugzilla>
Vendor      : Red Hat, Inc.
Summary     : The skeleton package which defines a simple Red Hat Enterprise Linux system
Description :
Basesystem defines the components of a basic Red Hat Enterprise Linux
system (for example, the package installation order to use during
bootstrapping). Basesystem should be in every installation of a system,
and it should never be removed.

 

OSCommerce how to change / reset lost admin password

Monday, October 16th, 2017

reset-forgotten-lost-oscommerce-password-howto-Os_commerce-logo.svg

How to change / reset OSCommerce lost / forgotten admin password?

The password in OSCommerce is kept in table "admin", so to reset password connect to MySQL with mysql cli client.

First thing to do is to generate the new hash string, you can do that with a simple php script using the md5(); function

 

root@pcfreak:/var/www/files# cat 1.php
<?
$pass=md5('password');
echo $pass;
?>

 

root@pcfreak:/var/www/files# php 1.php
5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99
root@pcfreak:/var/www/files#

 

Our just generated string (for text password password) is hash: 5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99

Next to update the new hash string into SQL, we connect to MySQL:

 

$ mysql -u root -p

 


And issue following command to modify the encrypted hash string:

 

UPDATE `DB`.`admin` SET `admin_password` = '5f4dcc3b5aa765d61d8327deb882cf99' WHERE `admin`.`admin_id` = 6;

Find all running hosts, used IPs and ports on your local wireless / ethernet network or how to do a basic network security audit with nmap

Monday, September 4th, 2017

Find all running hosts / used IPs on your local wireless or ethernet network

nmap-scn-local-network-find-all-running-hosts-used-IPs-on-your-wireless-ethernet-network

If you're using a Free Software OS such as GNU / Linux or some other proprietary OS such as Mac OS X or Windows and you need a quick way to check all running IPs hosts / nodes locally on your current connected Ethernet or Wireless network, here is how to do it with nmap (Network exploration and security tool port scanner).

So why would you do scan that? 

Well just for fun, out of curiousity or just because you want to inspect your local network whether someone unexpected cracker did not break and is not using your Wi-Fi or Ethernet local network and badly snoring your network listening for passwords.

Before you start you should have installed NMAP network scanner on your GNU / Linux, to do so on 

Redhat Based Linux (Fedora / CentOS / Redhat Enterprise RHEL):

 

yum -y install nmap

 

On Deb based GNU / Linux-es such as Ubuntu / Mint / Debian etc.

 

apt-get install –yes nmap

 

To install nmap on FreeBSD / NetBSD / OpenBSD OS issue from console or terminal:

 

cd /usr/ports/security/nmap
make install clean 

 

or if you prefer to install it from latest binary instead of compiling

 

pkg_add -vr nmap

 

On a proprietary Mac OS X (I don't recommend you to use this obnoxious OS which is designed as a proprpietary software to steal your freedom and control you, but anyways for Mac OS victims), you can do it to with Macs equivalent tool of apt-get / yum called homebrew:

Open Mac OS X terminal and to install homebrew run:

 

ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)"
brew install nmap
brew search nmap
brew info nmap

 

If you want to do it system wide become root (super user) from Mac terminal with

 

su root

 

and run above commands as administrator user.

Windows users might take a look at Nmap for Windows or use the M$ Windows native portqry command line port scanner

Test whether nmap is properly installed and ready to use with command:

 

nmap –help
Nmap 6.00 ( http://nmap.org )
Usage: nmap [Scan Type(s)] [Options] {target specification}
TARGET SPECIFICATION:
  Can pass hostnames, IP addresses, networks, etc.
  Ex: scanme.nmap.org, microsoft.com/24, 192.168.0.1; 10.0.0-255.1-254
  -iL <inputfilename>: Input from list of hosts/networks
  -iR <num hosts>: Choose random targets
  –exclude <host1[,host2][,host3],…>: Exclude hosts/networks
  –excludefile <exclude_file>: Exclude list from file
HOST DISCOVERY:
  -sL: List Scan – simply list targets to scan
  -sn: Ping Scan – disable port scan
  -Pn: Treat all hosts as online — skip host discovery
  -PS/PA/PU/PY[portlist]: TCP SYN/ACK, UDP or SCTP discovery to given ports
  -PE/PP/PM: ICMP echo, timestamp, and netmask request discovery probes
  -PO[protocol list]: IP Protocol Ping
  -n/-R: Never do DNS resolution/Always resolve [default: sometimes]
  –dns-servers <serv1[,serv2],…>: Specify custom DNS servers
  –system-dns: Use OS's DNS resolver
  –traceroute: Trace hop path to each host
SCAN TECHNIQUES:
  -sS/sT/sA/sW/sM: TCP SYN/Connect()/ACK/Window/Maimon scans
  -sU: UDP Scan
  -sN/sF/sX: TCP Null, FIN, and Xmas scans
  –scanflags <flags>: Customize TCP scan flags
  -sI <zombie host[:probeport]>: Idle scan
  -sY/sZ: SCTP INIT/COOKIE-ECHO scans
  -sO: IP protocol scan
  -b <FTP relay host>: FTP bounce scan
PORT SPECIFICATION AND SCAN ORDER:
  -p <port ranges>: Only scan specified ports
    Ex: -p22; -p1-65535; -p U:53,111,137,T:21-25,80,139,8080,S:9
  -F: Fast mode – Scan fewer ports than the default scan
  -r: Scan ports consecutively – don't randomize
  –top-ports <number>: Scan <number> most common ports
  –port-ratio <ratio>: Scan ports more common than <ratio>
SERVICE/VERSION DETECTION:
  -sV: Probe open ports to determine service/version info
  –version-intensity <level>: Set from 0 (light) to 9 (try all probes)
  –version-light: Limit to most likely probes (intensity 2)
  –version-all: Try every single probe (intensity 9)
  –version-trace: Show detailed version scan activity (for debugging)
SCRIPT SCAN:
  -sC: equivalent to –script=default
  –script=<Lua scripts>: <Lua scripts> is a comma separated list of 
           directories, script-files or script-categories
  –script-args=<n1=v1,[n2=v2,…]>: provide arguments to scripts
  –script-args-file=filename: provide NSE script args in a file
  –script-trace: Show all data sent and received
  –script-updatedb: Update the script database.
  –script-help=<Lua scripts>: Show help about scripts.
           <Lua scripts> is a comma separted list of script-files or
           script-categories.
OS DETECTION:
  -O: Enable OS detection
  –osscan-limit: Limit OS detection to promising targets
  –osscan-guess: Guess OS more aggressively
TIMING AND PERFORMANCE:
  Options which take <time> are in seconds, or append 'ms' (milliseconds),
  's' (seconds), 'm' (minutes), or 'h' (hours) to the value (e.g. 30m).
  -T<0-5>: Set timing template (higher is faster)
  –min-hostgroup/max-hostgroup <size>: Parallel host scan group sizes
  –min-parallelism/max-parallelism <numprobes>: Probe parallelization
  –min-rtt-timeout/max-rtt-timeout/initial-rtt-timeout <time>: Specifies
      probe round trip time.
  –max-retries <tries>: Caps number of port scan probe retransmissions.
  –host-timeout <time>: Give up on target after this long
  –scan-delay/–max-scan-delay <time>: Adjust delay between probes
  –min-rate <number>: Send packets no slower than <number> per second
  –max-rate <number>: Send packets no faster than <number> per second
FIREWALL/IDS EVASION AND SPOOFING:
  -f; –mtu <val>: fragment packets (optionally w/given MTU)
  -D <decoy1,decoy2[,ME],…>: Cloak a scan with decoys
  -S <IP_Address>: Spoof source address
  -e <iface>: Use specified interface
  -g/–source-port <portnum>: Use given port number
  –data-length <num>: Append random data to sent packets
  –ip-options <options>: Send packets with specified ip options
  –ttl <val>: Set IP time-to-live field
  –spoof-mac <mac address/prefix/vendor name>: Spoof your MAC address
  –badsum: Send packets with a bogus TCP/UDP/SCTP checksum
OUTPUT:
  -oN/-oX/-oS/-oG <file>: Output scan in normal, XML, s|<rIpt kIddi3,
     and Grepable format, respectively, to the given filename.
  -oA <basename>: Output in the three major formats at once
  -v: Increase verbosity level (use -vv or more for greater effect)
  -d: Increase debugging level (use -dd or more for greater effect)
  –reason: Display the reason a port is in a particular state
  –open: Only show open (or possibly open) ports
  –packet-trace: Show all packets sent and received
  –iflist: Print host interfaces and routes (for debugging)
  –log-errors: Log errors/warnings to the normal-format output file
  –append-output: Append to rather than clobber specified output files
  –resume <filename>: Resume an aborted scan
  –stylesheet <path/URL>: XSL stylesheet to transform XML output to HTML
  –webxml: Reference stylesheet from Nmap.Org for more portable XML
  –no-stylesheet: Prevent associating of XSL stylesheet w/XML output
MISC:
  -6: Enable IPv6 scanning
  -A: Enable OS detection, version detection, script scanning, and traceroute
  –datadir <dirname>: Specify custom Nmap data file location
  –send-eth/–send-ip: Send using raw ethernet frames or IP packets
  –privileged: Assume that the user is fully privileged
  –unprivileged: Assume the user lacks raw socket privileges
  -V: Print version number
  -h: Print this help summary page.
EXAMPLES:
  nmap -v -A scanme.nmap.org
  nmap -v -sn 192.168.0.0/16 10.0.0.0/8
  nmap -v -iR 10000 -Pn -p 80
SEE THE MAN PAGE (http://nmap.org/book/man.html) FOR MORE OPTIONS AND EXAMPLES

 


Most local router local networks are running under an IP range of 192.168.0.1/24 (192.168.0.1.254) or 192.168.1.1/24 or at some weird occasions depending on how the router is configured it might be something like 192.168.10.0/24 to be sure on what kind of network your computer is configured, you can check with ifconfig command, what kind of network IP has the router assigned to your computer, here is output from my Debian GNU / Linux /sbin/ifconfig

 

 hipo@noah:~$ /sbin/ifconfig 
lo        Link encap:Local Loopback  
          inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
          inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
          UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:16436  Metric:1
          RX packets:336 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:336 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
          RX bytes:26656 (26.0 KiB)  TX bytes:26656 (26.0 KiB)

 

 

wlan0     Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:1c:bf:bd:27:59  
          inet addr:192.168.0.103  Bcast:192.168.0.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::21c:bfff:ffbd:2759/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:112836 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:55363 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
          RX bytes:141318655 (134.7 MiB)  TX bytes:7391330 (7.0 MiB)

 

As evident from above output my router assigns IPs via DHCP once authenticated into the Wi-Fi router under standard IP range of 192.168.0.0/24

So under this IP range case, to inspect my small local networkconnected computer I had to run from gnome-terminal or under a /dev/ttyX virtual console:

 

hipo@noah:~$ nmap -sn 192.168.0.0/24

Starting Nmap 6.00 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2017-09-04 12:45 EEST
Nmap scan report for pcfreak (192.168.0.1)
Host is up (0.011s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.0.103
Host is up (0.00011s latency).
Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (2 hosts up) scanned in 2.53 seconds


-sn argument instructs nmap to do the so called ping scan, e.g. not to do a port s
can after host discovery but just print available hosts that are responding

Some bigger corporate networks are configured to run a couple of local networks simultaneously such as 192.168.168.0.0/24, 192.168.1.0/24, 192.168.2.0/24 etc.

So if that's the case you can add more virtual IPs to your ifconfig after becoming root super user with:

 

hipo@noah:~$ su root 
Password: 
root@noah:/home/hipo# 

 

And then run:

 

/sbin/ifconfig wlan0:0 192.168.1.110 netmask 255.255.255.0
/sbin/ifconfig wlan0:1 192.168.2.110 netmask 255.255.255.0

 

etc.

Note that here I purposefully choose .110 IP because often the 192.168.1.1 is an IP assigned to the router and that might cause some IP conflicts and trigger alarms in the router security which I want to avoid.

To check just added extra Virtual IPs on wlan0 wireless interface (note that depending on your Wi-Fi card and your driver this interface might come under a different name on your computer):

 

root@noah# /sbin/ifconfig |grep -i wlan0 -A 1
wlan0     Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:1c:bf:bd:25:59  
          inet addr:192.168.0.103  Bcast:192.168.0.255  Mask:255.255.255.0

wlan0:0   Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:1c:bf:bd:25:59  
          inet addr:192.168.1.110  Bcast:192.168.1.255  Mask:255.255.255.0

wlan0:1   Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:1c:bf:bd:27:59  
          inet addr:192.168.2.110  Bcast:192.168.2.255  Mask:255.255.255.0

 

 

If you're scanning not on your own network but on a public connected network you might prefer to not use the ping scan as this might identify you in router's firewall as possible intruder and could cause you headaches, besides that some network connected nodes are connected to not respond on a ping scan (some networks purposefully disable pings at all) to avoid possibility of the so called ping flood that might overload a router buffer or bring down hosts on the network beinf flooded.

If you have doubts that a network has ping disabled and it shows no result you can give a try to the so called SYN / FIN Stealth packet scan with added requirement to scan for UDP open ports (-sS) argument

 

root@noah:/~# nmap -sS -sU -sT 192.168.0.1-255

Starting Nmap 6.00 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2017-09-04 13:31 EEST
Nmap scan report for pcfreak (192.168.0.1)
Host is up (0.012s latency).
Not shown: 998 closed ports
PORT     STATE SERVICE
80/tcp   open  http
1900/tcp open  upnp
MAC Address: 10:FE:ED:43:CF:0E (Unknown)

Nmap scan report for 192.168.0.100
Host is up (0.0036s latency).
Not shown: 998 closed ports
PORT      STATE SERVICE
625/tcp   open  apple-xsrvr-admin
49153/tcp open  unknown
MAC Address: 84:38:35:5F:28:75 (Unknown)

Nmap scan report for 192.168.0.103
Host is up (0.000012s latency).
Not shown: 999 closed ports
PORT   STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open  ssh


You might also like to add some verbosy (that would generate a lot of output so be careful):

In case if above scan fails due to firewalls and you have a ping scan disabled on the network too you might also try out the so called nmap connect TCP connect scan (-sT), that would avoid the SYN scan. The -sT is useful also if you're not possessing root superprivileges on nmap running host.

 

nmap -sS -sU 192.168.0.1-255


Note that connect scan could take ages as nmap tries to connect every port from default port scanned ranged on remote found hosts that are reporting as up and running.

If the shown results lead you find some unknown computer / tablet / mobile / phone device connected to your network, then connect to your router and thoroughfully inspect the traffic flowing through it, if you find intruder cut him off and change immediately your router passwords and monitor your network periodically to make sure the unwanted guest did not go back in future.

There is much more you can do with nmap so if you have some extra time and interest into penetration testing I recommend you check out Nmap Book (The Official Nmap project guide to Network Discovery and Security Scanning)

Check your Server Download / Upload Internet Speed from Console on Linux / BSD / Unix howto

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

tux-check-internet-network-download-upload-speed-on-linux-console-terminal-linux-bsd-unix
If you've been given a new dedicated server from a New Dedicated-Server-Provider or VPS with Linux and you were told that a certain download speed to the Server is guaranteed from the server provider, in order to be sure the server's connection to the Internet told by service provider is correct it is useful to run a simple measurement console test after logging in remotely to the server via SSH.

Testing connection from Terminal is useful because as you probably know most of Linux / UNIX servers doesn't have a GUI interface and thus it is not possible to test Internet Up / Down Bandwidth through speedtest.net.
 

1. Testing Download Internet Speed given by ISP / Dedi-Server Provider from Linux Console

For the download speed (internet) test the historical approach was to just try downloading the Linux kernel source code from www.kernel.org with some text browser such as lynx or links count the seconds for which the download is completed and then multiple the kernel source archive size on the seconds to get an approximate bandwidth per second, however as nowdays internet connection speeds are much higher, thus it is better to try to download some Linux distribution iso file, you can still use kernel tar archive but it completed too fast to give you some good (adequate) statistics on Download bandwidth.

If its a fresh installed Linux server probably you will probably not have links / elinks and lynx text internet browers  installed so install them depending on deb / rpm distro with:

If on Deb Linuz distro:

 

root@pcfreak:/root# apt-get install –yes links elinks lynx

 

On RPM Based Linuz distro:
 

 

[root@fedora ~]# yum install -y lynx elinks links

 

Conduct Internet  Download Speed with links
root@pcfreak:/root# links https://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/v3.x/linux-3.19.1.tar.xz

check_your_download_speed-from-console-linux-with-links-text-browser

(Note that the kernel link is current latest stable Kernel source code archive in future that might change, so try with latest archive.)

You can also use non-interactive tool such as wget curl or lftp to measure internet download speed

To test Download Internet Speed with wget without saving anything to disk set output to go to /dev/null 

 

root@pcfreak:~# wget -O /dev/null https://pc-freak.net//~hipo/hirens-bootcd/HirensBootCD15/Hirens.BootCD.15.0.zip

 

check_bandwidth_download-internet-speed-with-wget-from-console-non-interactively-on-linux

You see the Download speed is 104 Mbit/s this is so because I'm conducting the download from my local 100Mbit network.

For the test you can use my mirrored version of Hirens BootCD

2. Testing Uplink Internet speed provided by ISP / Server Provider from Linux (SSH) Console

To test your uplink speed you will need lftp or iperf command tool.

 

root@pcfreak:~# apt-cache show lftp|grep -i descr -A 12
Description: Sophisticated command-line FTP/HTTP client programs
 Lftp is a file retrieving tool that supports FTP, HTTP, FISH, SFTP, HTTPS
 and FTPS protocols under both IPv4 and IPv6. Lftp has an amazing set of
 features, while preserving its interface as simple and easy as possible.
 .
 The main two advantages over other ftp clients are reliability and ability
 to perform tasks in background. It will reconnect and reget the file being
 transferred if the connection broke. You can start a transfer in background
 and continue browsing on the ftp site. It does this all in one process. When
 you have started background jobs and feel you are done, you can just exit
 lftp and it automatically moves to nohup mode and completes the transfers.
 It has also such nice features as reput and mirror. It can also download a
 file as soon as possible by using several connections at the same time.

 

root@pcfreak:/root# apt-cache show iperf|grep -i desc -A 2
Description: Internet Protocol bandwidth measuring tool
 Iperf is a modern alternative for measuring TCP and UDP bandwidth performance,
 allowing the tuning of various parameters and characteristics.

 

To test Upload Speed to Internet connect remotely and upload any FTP file:

 

root@pcfreak:/root# lftp -u hipo pc-freak.net -e 'put Hirens.BootCD.15.0.zip; bye'

 

uploading-file-with-lftp-screenshot-test-upload-internet-speed-linux

On Debian Linux to install iperf:

 

root@pcfreak:/root# apt-get install –yes iperf

 

On latest CentOS 7 and Fedora (and other RPM based) Linux, you will need to add RPMForge repository and install with yum

 

[root@centos ~]# rpm -ivh  rpmforge-release-0.5.3-1.el7.rf.x86_64.rpm

[root@centos ~]# yum -y install iperf

 

Once having iperf on the server the easiest way currently to test it is to use
serverius.net speedtest server –  located at the Serverius datacenters, AS50673 and is running on a 10GE connection with 5GB cap.

 

root@pcfreak:/root# iperf -c speedtest.serverius.net -P 10
————————————————————
Client connecting to speedtest.serverius.net, TCP port 5001
TCP window size: 16.0 KByte (default)
————————————————————
[ 12] local 83.228.93.76 port 54258 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[  7] local 83.228.93.76 port 54252 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[  5] local 83.228.93.76 port 54253 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[  9] local 83.228.93.76 port 54251 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[  3] local 83.228.93.76 port 54249 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[  4] local 83.228.93.76 port 54250 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[ 10] local 83.228.93.76 port 54254 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[ 11] local 83.228.93.76 port 54255 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[  6] local 83.228.93.76 port 54256 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[  8] local 83.228.93.76 port 54257 connected with 178.21.16.76 port 5001
[ ID] Interval       Transfer     Bandwidth
[  9]  0.0-10.2 sec  4.05 MBytes  3.33 Mbits/sec
[ 10]  0.0-10.2 sec  3.39 MBytes  2.78 Mbits/sec
[ 11]  0.0-10.3 sec  3.75 MBytes  3.06 Mbits/sec
[  4]  0.0-10.3 sec  3.43 MBytes  2.78 Mbits/sec
[ 12]  0.0-10.3 sec  3.92 MBytes  3.18 Mbits/sec
[  3]  0.0-10.4 sec  4.45 MBytes  3.58 Mbits/sec
[  5]  0.0-10.5 sec  4.06 MBytes  3.24 Mbits/sec
[  6]  0.0-10.5 sec  4.30 MBytes  3.42 Mbits/sec
[  8]  0.0-10.8 sec  3.92 MBytes  3.03 Mbits/sec
[  7]  0.0-10.9 sec  4.03 MBytes  3.11 Mbits/sec
[SUM]  0.0-10.9 sec  39.3 MBytes  30.3 Mbits/sec

 

You see currently my home machine has an Uplink of 30.3 Mbit/s per second, that's pretty nice since I've ordered a 100Mbits from my ISP (Unguaranteed Bandwidth Connection Speed) and as you might know it is a standard practice for many Internet Proviers to give Uplink speed of 1/4 from the ISP provided overall bandwidth 1/4 would be 25Mbi/s, meaning my ISP (Bergon.NET) is doing pretty well providing me with even more than promised (ordered) bandwidth.

Iperf is probably the choice of most sysadmins who have to do regular bandwidth in local networks speed between 2 servers or test  Internet Bandwidth speed on heterogenous network with Linux / BSDs / AIX / HP-UX (UNIXes). On HP-UX and AIX and other UNIXes for which iperf doesn't have port you have to compile it yourself.

If you don't have root /admin permissions on server and there is python language enterpreter installed you can use speedtest_cli.py script to test internet throughput connectivity
speedtest_cli uses speedtest.net to test server up / down link just in case if script is lost in future I've made ownload mirror of speedtest_cli.py is here

Quickest way to test net speed with speedtest_cli.py:

 

$ lynx -dump https://raw.github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/master/speedtest_cli.py > speedtest_cli.py
$ chmod +x speedtest_cli.py
python speedtest_cli.py

speedtest_cli_pyhon_script_screenshot-on-gnu-linux-test-internet-network-speed-on-unix

How to find and Delete Duplicate files in directory on Linux server with find and fdupes command

Monday, March 16th, 2015

search-duplcate-files-linux-command-and-graphical-tools-how-to-find-duplicate-files-on-linux-mac-and-windows-os

Linux / UNIX find command is very helpful to do a lot of tasks to us admins such as Deleting empty directories to free up occupied inodes or finding and printing only empty files within a root file system within all sub-directories
There is too much of uses of find, however one that is probably rarely used known by sysadmins find command use is how to search for duplicate files on a Linux server:
 

find -not -empty -type f -printf “%s\n” | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 –all-repeated=separate

If you're curious how does duplicate files finding works, they are found by comparing file sizes and MD5 signatures, followed by a byte-by-byte comparison.

Most common application of below command is when you want to search and get rid of some old obsolete files which you forgot to delete such as old /etc/ configurations, old SQL backups and PHP / Java / Python programming code files etc.

If you have to do a regular duplicate file find on multiple servers Linux servers perhaps you should install and use  fdupes command.
On Debian Linux to install it:

root@pcfreak:/# apt-cache show fdupes|grep -i descr -A 4
Description: identifies duplicate files within given directories
 FDupes uses md5sums and then a byte by byte comparison to find
 duplicate files within a set of directories. It has several useful
 options including recursion.
Homepage: http://code.google.com/p/fdupes/

 

root@pc-freak.net:/# apt-get install –yes fdupes

To search for duplicate files with fdupes in lets /etc/ just run fdupes without arguments:

 

root@pcfreak:/# fdupes /etc/
/etc/magic
/etc/magic.mime

/etc/odbc.ini
/etc/.pwd.lock
/etc/environment
/etc/odbcinst.ini

/etc/shadow-
/etc/shadow


If you want to look up for all duplicate files within root directory:
 

root@pcfreak:/# fdupes -r /etc/
Building file list /

 

You can also find duplicate files for multiple directories by just passing all directories as arguments to fdupes

 

root@pcfreak:/# fdupes -r /etc/ /usr/ /root /disk /nfs_mount /nas


The -r argument (makes a recursive subdirectory search for duplicates), if you want to also see what is the size of duplicate files found add -S option

 

fdupes -r -S /etc/ /usr/ /root /disk /nfs_mount /nas

 


If you want to delete all duplicate files within lets say /etc/

 

root@pcfreak:/# fdupes -d /etc/

fdupes is also available and installable also on RPM based Linux distros Fedora / RHEL / CentOS etc., install on CentOS with:
 

[root@centos~ ]# yum -y install fdupes


There is also a port available for those who want to run it on FreeBSD on BSD install it from ports:

 

freebsd# cd /usr/ports/sysutils/fdupes
freebsd# make install clean


If you have a GUI environment installed on the server and you don't want to bother with command line to search for all duplicate files under main filesystem and other lint (junk) files take a look at FSlint

FSlint-2.02-search-for-duplicate-and-lint-files-linux-gui-tool

If you're looking for a GUI cross platform duplicate file finder tool that runs on all major used Operating Systems Mac OS X / Windows / Linux take a look at dupeGuru

 

How to determine which processes make most writes on the hard drive in GNU / Linux using kernel variable

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

how-to-determine-which-processes-writes-most-to-hard-drive-Linux-Kernel
In Linux there are plenty of tools to measure input / ouput – read / write server bottlenecks. Just to mention a few such are, the native part of all Linux distributions IOSTAT – which is a great tool to measure hard disk bottlenecks. However as iostat requires certain sysadmin skills for novice sys-admins, there is also ofcourse more interactive tools such as DSTAT or even better GLANCE which monitors not only disk writes but memory use, CPU load and Network use.

This tools can help you measure which processes are writting most (a lot) to hard disk drive but there is another quick and efficient way to track disk i/o by directly using the Linux kernel this is done via kernel parameter :

/proc/sys/vm/block_dump

To enable block_dump kernel logging:

echo 1 > /proc/sys/vm/block_dump

To later track in real time output from kernel interactively on which running process calling the kernel is writing to server hard drive
 

tail -f /var/log/syslog

The output  looks like so:
 

Nov 13 12:25:51 pcfreak kernel: [1075037.701056] kjournald(297): WRITE block 482293496 on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:51 pcfreak kernel: [1075037.701059] kjournald(297): WRITE block 482293504 on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:51 pcfreak kernel: [1075037.701062] kjournald(297): WRITE block 482293512 on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:51 pcfreak kernel: [1075037.701066] kjournald(297): WRITE block 482293520 on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:51 pcfreak kernel: [1075037.701069] kjournald(297): WRITE block 482293528 on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:51 pcfreak kernel: [1075037.701072] kjournald(297): WRITE block 482293536 on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:51 pcfreak kernel: [1075037.702824] kjournald(297): WRITE block 482293544 on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:52 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.219288] apache2(3377): dirtied inode 3571740 (_index.html.old) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:52 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.436133] mysqld(22945): dirtied inode 21546676 (#sql_c0a_0.MYI) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:52 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.436826] mysqld(22945): dirtied inode 21546677 (#sql_c0a_0.MYD) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:53 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.662832] mysqld(22945): dirtied inode 21546676 (#sql_c0a_0.MYI) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:53 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.663297] mysqld(22945): dirtied inode 21546677 (#sql_c0a_0.MYD) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:53 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.817120] apache2(3377): dirtied inode 3571754 (_index.html) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:53 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.819968] apache2(3377): dirtied inode 3571740 (_index.html_gzip) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:53 pcfreak kernel: [1075039.820016] apache2(3377): dirtied inode 3571730 (?) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:53 pcfreak kernel: [1075040.491378] mysqld(22931): dirtied inode 21546676 (#sql_c0a_0.MYI) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:53 pcfreak kernel: [1075040.492309] mysqld(22931): dirtied inode 21546677 (#sql_c0a_0.MYD) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:54 pcfreak kernel: [1075041.551513] apache2(3377): dirtied inode 1474706 (_index.html_gzip.old) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:54 pcfreak kernel: [1075041.551566] apache2(3377): dirtied inode 1474712 (_index.html.old) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:55 pcfreak kernel: [1075041.769036] mysqld(22941): dirtied inode 21546676 (#sql_c0a_0.MYI) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:55 pcfreak kernel: [1075041.769804] mysqld(22941): dirtied inode 21546677 (#sql_c0a_0.MYD) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:55 pcfreak kernel: [1075041.985857] apache2(3282): dirtied inode 4063282 (data_9d97a7f62d54bc5fd791fba3245ba591-SMF-modSettings.php) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:55 pcfreak kernel: [1075041.987460] apache2(3282): dirtied inode 29010186 (data_9d97a7f62d54bc5fd791fba3245ba591-SMF-permissions–1.php) on sda1
Nov 13 12:25:55 pcfreak kernel: [1075041.988357] flush-8:0(289): WRITE block 51350632 on sda1

Using the kernel method to see which processes are stoning your server is great way especially for servers without connectivity to the Internet where you have no possibility to install sysstat package (contaning iostat),  dstat or glance.
Thanks to Marto's blog for  this nice hack.

Enabling talkd (Console Chat) between logged in users on FreeBSD and other BSDs

Sunday, June 10th, 2012

Talk between two useres on  FreeBSD 7.2 screenshot, console peer to peer interactive talk program UNIX, Linux, BSD

Those who are in familiar with older UNIXes, UNIX BSD derivatives and GNU Linux should certainly remember the times, when we hackers used to talk to each other using talk service.

Those who don't know what talk command is it is a simple console / ssh utility to talk to another logged in users.

Talk is very similar to write and mesg one liner messasing utilities available for *nixes, the difference is it is intendted to provide interactive chat between the two logged in users. People who came to know UNIX or free software in older times most likely don't know talk, however I still remember how precious this tool was for communication back in the day.

I believe still it can be useful so I dediced to install ot on one FreeBSD host.

In order to have the talk service running on BSD it is necessery to have /usr/libexec/ntalkd installed on the system this however is installed by default with standard BSD OS installs, so no need for any external ports install to run it.

talk doesn't have it's own init script to start is not written to run as it own service but in order to run it is is necessery to enable it via inetd

Enabling it is done by;;;

1 — Editting /etc/inetd.conf

Inside the conf the line::

#ntalk dgram udp wait tty:tty /usr/libexec/ntalkd ntalkd

should be uncommented e.g, become ;;;

ntalk dgram udp wait tty:tty /usr/libexec/ntalkd ntalkd

2 — Restart inetd

freebsd# /etc/rc.d/inetd restart
Stopping inetd.
Starting inetd.

talk is planned to be used for peer to peer conversations over SSH so in a way it is the GRANDFATHER 🙂 of IRC, ICQ and Skype;;;

Here is an example on how talk is used ,, Let's say there are three logged in users

pcfreak# w
12:39PM up 3 days, 16:25, 3 users, load averages: 1.12, 0.91, 0.71
USER TTY FROM LOGIN@ IDLE WHAT
testuser p0 192.168.0.7 10:50AM - bash
hipo p3 192.168.0.8 12:23PM - w
root p4 :ttyp2:S.0 12:24PM - vim /usr/local/www/dat

I'm logged in with my username hipo and I would like to talk to testuser ;;;;

pcfreak% tty
/dev/ttyp3

You see I'm logged in on /dev/ttyp3 (this is the specific naming on BSDs) on Linux equivalent is /dev/tty3So to talk the other user testuser;;;;;-

$ talk testuser ttyp0
[No connection yet]
[Waiting for your party to respond]

The testuser logged in via SSH will then get a message ||;

Message from Talk_Daemon@pcfreak at 12:44 on 2012/06/10 ...
talk: connection requested by hipo@localhost
talk: respond with: talk hipo@localhost

To enter a talk session then the logged in testuser has to type:

$ talk hipo@localhost

 

Fix “Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable.” in FreeBSD

Monday, May 21st, 2012

bsdinstall-newboot-loader-menu-pv_entries_consider_increasing_vm_pmap_shpgrepproc

I'm running FreeBSD with Apache and PHP on it and I got in dmesg (kernel log), following error:

freebsd# dmesg|grep -i vm.pmap.shpgperproc
Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable.
Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable.
Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable.
Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable.
Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable.

The exact FreeBSD, Apache and php versions I have installed are:
 

freebsd# uname -a ; httpd -V ; php –version
FreeBSD pcfreak 7.2-RELEASE-p4 FreeBSD 7.2-RELEASE-p4 #0: Fri Oct 2 12:21:39 UTC 2009 root@i386-builder.daemonology.net:/usr/obj/usr/src/sys/GENERIC i386
Server version: Apache/2.0.64
Server built: Mar 13 2011 23:36:25Server's Module Magic Number: 20050127:14
Server loaded: APR 0.9.19, APR-UTIL 0.9.19
Compiled using: APR 0.9.19, APR-UTIL 0.9.19
Architecture: 32-bit
Server compiled with….
-D APACHE_MPM_DIR="server/mpm/prefork"
-D APR_HAS_SENDFILE
-D APR_HAS_MMAP
-D APR_HAVE_IPV6 (IPv4-mapped addresses enabled)
-D APR_USE_FLOCK_SERIALIZE
-D APR_USE_PTHREAD_SERIALIZE
-D SINGLE_LISTEN_UNSERIALIZED_ACCEPT
-D APR_HAS_OTHER_CHILD
-D AP_HAVE_RELIABLE_PIPED_LOGS
-D HTTPD_ROOT="/usr/local"
-D SUEXEC_BIN="/usr/local/bin/suexec"
-D DEFAULT_PIDLOG="/var/run/httpd.pid"
-D DEFAULT_SCOREBOARD="logs/apache_runtime_status"
-D DEFAULT_LOCKFILE="/var/run/accept.lock"
-D DEFAULT_ERRORLOG="logs/error_log"
-D AP_TYPES_CONFIG_FILE="etc/apache2/mime.types"
-D SERVER_CONFIG_FILE="etc/apache2/httpd.conf"
PHP 5.3.5 with Suhosin-Patch (cli) (built: Mar 14 2011 00:29:17)
Copyright (c) 1997-2009 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2010 Zend Technologies
with eAccelerator v0.9.6.1, Copyright (c) 2004-2010 eAccelerator, by eAccelerator

After a bunch of research a FreeBSD forums thread , I've found the fix suggested by a guy.

The solution suggested in the forum is to raise up vm.pmap.pv_entry_ma to vm.pmap.pv_entry_max=1743504, however I've noticed this value is read only and cannot be changed on the BSD running kernel;

freebsd# sysctl vm.pmap.pv_entry_max=1743504
sysctl: oid 'vm.pmap.pv_entry_max' is read only

Instead to solve the;

Approaching the limit on PV entries, consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc or the vm.pmap.pv_entry_max tunable.
, I had to add in /boot/loader.conf

vm.pmap.pde.mappings=68
vm.pmap.shpgperproc=500
vm.pmap.pv_entry_max=1743504

Adding this values through /boot/loader.conf set them on kernel boot time. I've seen also in the threads the consider increasing either the vm.pmap.shpgperproc is also encountered on FreeBSD hosts running Squid, Dansguardion and other web proxy softwares on busy hosts.

This problems are not likely to happen for people who are running latest FreeBSD releases (>8.3, 9.x), I've read in same above post in newer BSD kernels the vm.pmap is no longer existing in newer kernels.