Posts Tagged ‘logging’

How to Set MySQL MariaDB server root user to be able to connect from any host on the Internet / Solution to ‘ ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user ‘root’@’localhost’ (using password: YES) ‘

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019

How-to-set-up-MariaDB-server-root-admin-user-to-be-able-to-connect-from-any-host-anywhere-mariadb-seal-logo-picture

In this small article, I'll shortly explain on how I setup a Standard default package MariaDB Database server on Debian 10 Buster Linux and how I configured it to be accessible from any hostname on the Internet in order to make connection from remote Developer PC with MySQL GUI SQL administration tools such as MySQL WorkBench / HeidiSQL / Navicat / dbForge   as well as the few set-backs experienced in the process (e.g. what was the reason for ' ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES) '  error and its solution.

Setting new or changing old MariaDB (MySQL) root server password

 

I've setup a brand new MariaDB database (The new free OpenSource software fork of MySQL) mariadb-server-10.3 on a Debian 10, right after the OS was installed with the usual apt command:

# apt install mariadb-server

Next tep was to change the root access password which was set to empty pass by default, e.g. connected with mysql CLI locally while logged via SSH on server and run:

MariaDB [(none)]> mysql -u root -p

use mysql;
update user set authentication_string=PASSWORD("MyChosenNewPassword") where User='root';

There was requirement by the customer, that MySQL server is not only accessed locally but be accessed from any IP address from anywhere on the Internet, so next step was to do so.

Allowing access to MySQL server from Anywhere

Allowing access from any host to MariaDB SQL server  is a bad security practice but as the customer is the King I've fulfilled this weird wish too, by changing the listener for MariaDB (MySQL) on Debian 10 codenamed Buster
 
changing the default listener
to be not the default 127.0.0.1 (localhost) but any listener is done by modifying the bind-address directive in conf /etc/mysql/mariadb.conf.d/50-server.cnf:

root@linux:~# vim /etc/mysql/mariadb.conf.d/50-server.cnf

Then comment out

bind-address  = 127.0.0.1

and  add instead 0.0.0.0 (any listener)

 

bind-address  = 0.0.0.0
root@linux:/etc/mysql/mariadb.conf.d# grep -i bind-address 50-server.cnf
##bind-address            = 127.0.0.1
bind-address    = 0.0.0.0


Then to make the new change effective restart MariaDB (luckily still using the old systemV init script even though systemd is working.
 

root@linux:~# /etc/init.d/mysql restart
[ ok ] Restarting mysql (via systemctl): mysql.service.


To make sure it is properly listening on MySQL defaults TCP port 3306, then as usual used netcat.

root@pritchi:~# netstat -etna |grep -i 3306
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:3306            0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      109        1479917  

 

By the way the exact mariadb.cnf used on this middle-sized front-backend server is here – the serveris planned to be a Apache Web server + Database host with MySQL DB of a middle range to be able to serve few thousand of simultaneous unique customers.

To make sure no firewall is preventing MariaDB to be accessed, I've checked for any reject rules iptables and ipset definitions, e.g.:
 

root@linux:~# iptables -L |gre -i rej

root@linux:~# ipset list

 

Then to double make sure the MySQL is allowed to access from anywhere, used simple telnet from my Desktop Laptop PC (that also runs Debian Linux) towards the server .

hipo@jeremiah:~$ telnet 52.88.235.45 3306
Trying 52.88.235.45…
Connected to 52.88.235.45.
Escape character is '^]'.
[
5.5.5-10.3.15-MariaDB-1
                       rQ}Cs>v\��-��G1[W%O>+Y^OQmysql_native_password
Connection closed by foreign host.

 

As telnet is not supporting the data encryption after TCP proto connect, in a few seconds time, remote server connection is terminated.

 

Setting MySQL user to be able to connect to local server MySQL from any remote hostname


I've connected locally to MariaDB server with mysql -u root -p and issued following set of SQL commands to make MySQL root user be able to connect from anywhere:

 

CREATE USER 'root'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'my-secret-pass';
GRANT ALL ON *.* TO 'root'@'localhost';
GRANT ALL ON *.* TO 'root'@'%';

 

Next step, I've took was to try logging in with root (admin) MariaDB superuser from MySQL CLI (Command Line Interface) on my desktop just to find out, I'm facing a nasty error.
 

hipo@jeremiah:~$ mysql -u root -H remote-server-hostname.com -p
Enter password:
ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES)


My first guess was something is wrong with my root user created in MySQL's mysql.user table (In MySQL this is the privileges table that stores, how MySQL user credentials are handled by mysqld local OS running process.

 

Changing the MySQL root (admin) password no longer possible on Debian 10 Buster?

 

The standard way ot change the MySQL root password well known via a simple dpkg-reconfigure (provided by Debian's debconf is no longer working so below command produces empty output instead of triggering the good old Ncurses text based interface well-known over the years …

 

root@linux:~# /usr/sbin/dpkg-reconfigure mariadb-server-10.3

 

 

Viewing MariaDB (MySQL) username / password set-up from the CLI

 

To list how this set-privileges looked like I've used following command:

 

MariaDB [mysql]> select * from mysql.user where User = 'root';
+———–+——+——————————————-+————-+————-+————-+————-+————-+———–+————-+—————+————–+———–+————+—————–+————+————+————–+————+———————–+——————+————–+—————–+——————+——————+—————-+———————+——————–+——————+————+————–+————————+———————+———-+————+————-+————–+—————+————-+—————–+———————-+———————–+———————–+——————+———+————–+——————–+
| Host      | User | Password                                  | Select_priv | Insert_priv | Update_priv | Delete_priv | Create_priv | Drop_priv | Reload_priv | Shutdown_priv | Process_priv | File_priv | Grant_priv | References_priv | Index_priv | Alter_priv | Show_db_priv | Super_priv | Create_tmp_table_priv | Lock_tables_priv | Execute_priv | Repl_slave_priv | Repl_client_priv | Create_view_priv | Show_view_priv | Create_routine_priv | Alter_routine_priv | Create_user_priv | Event_priv | Trigger_priv | Create_tablespace_priv | Delete_history_priv | ssl_type | ssl_cipher | x509_issuer | x509_subject | max_questions | max_updates | max_connections | max_user_connections | plugin                | authentication_string | password_expired | is_role | default_role | max_statement_time |
+———–+——+——————————————-+————-+————-+————-+————-+————-+———–+————-+—————+————–+———–+————+—————–+————+————+————–+————+———————–+——————+————–+—————–+——————+——————+—————-+———————+——————–+——————+————+————–+————————+———————+———-+————+————-+————–+—————+————-+—————–+———————-+———————–+———————–+——————+———+————–+——————–+
| localhost | root | *E6D338325F50177F2F6A15EDZE932D68C88B8C4F | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y         | Y           | Y             | Y            | Y         | Y          | Y               | Y          | Y          | Y            | Y          | Y                     | Y                | Y            | Y               | Y                | Y                | Y              | Y                   | Y                  | Y                | Y          | Y            | Y                      | Y                   |          |            |             |              |             0 |           0 |               0 |                    0 | mysql_native_password |                       | N                | N       |              |           0.000000 |
| %         | root | *E6D338325F50177F2F6A15EDZE932D68C88B8C4F | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y         | Y           | Y             | Y            | Y         | N          | Y               | Y          | Y          | Y            | Y          | Y                     | Y                | Y            | Y               | Y                | Y                | Y              | Y                   | Y                  | Y                | Y          | Y            | Y                      | Y                   |          |            |             |              |             0 |           0 |               0 |                    0 |                       |                       | N                | N       |              |           0.000000 |
+———–+——+——————————————-+————-+————-+————-+————-+————-+———–+————-+—————+————–+———–+————+—————–+————+————+————–+————+———————–+——————+————–+—————–+——————+——————+—————-+———————+——————–+——————+————+————–+————————+———————+———-+————+————-+————–+—————+————-+—————–+———————-+———————–+———————–+——————+———+————–+——————–+

 

The hashed (encrypted) password string is being changed from the one on the server, so please don't try to hack me (decrypt it) 🙂
As it is visible from below output the Host field for root has the '%' string which means, any hostname is authorized to be able to connect and login to the MySQL server, so this was not the problem.

After quite some time on reading on what causes
' ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES)
',
I've spend some time reading various forum discussions online on the err such as the one on StackOverflow here SuperUser.com's  how to fix access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' and one on askubuntu.com's – ERROR 1045(28000) : Access denied for user 'root@localhost' (using password: no ) and after a while finally got it, thanks to a cool IRC.FREENODE.NET guy nicknamed, hedenface who pointed me I'm that, I'm trying to use the -H flag (Prodice HTML) instead of -h (host_name), it seems somehow I ended up with the wrong memory that the -H stands for hostname, by simply using -h I could again login Hooray!!!

 

root@linux:~$ mysql -u root -h remote-server-host.com -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MariaDB monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MariaDB connection id is 14
Server version: 10.3.15-MariaDB-1 Debian 10

 

Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.


I've further asked the customer to confirm, he can connect also from his Microsoft Windows 10 PC situated on a different LAN network and got his confirmation. Few notes to make here is I've also installed phpmyadmin on the server using phpmyadmin php source code latest version, as in Debian 10 it seems the good old PHP is no longer available (as this crazy developers again made a mess and there is no phpmyadmin .deb package in Debian Buster – but that's a different story I'll perhaps try to document in some small article in future.

How to build Linux logging bash shell script write_log, logging with Named Pipe buffer, Simple Linux common log files logging with logger command

Monday, August 26th, 2019

how-to-build-bash-script-for-logging-buffer-named-pipes-basic-common-files-logging-with-logger-command

Logging into file in GNU / Linux and FreeBSD is as simple as simply redirecting the output, e.g.:
 

echo "$(date) Whatever" >> /home/hipo/log/output_file_log.txt


or with pyping to tee command

 

echo "$(date) Service has Crashed" | tee -a /home/hipo/log/output_file_log.txt


But what if you need to create a full featured logging bash robust shell script function that will run as a daemon continusly as a background process and will output
all content from itself to an external log file?
In below article, I've given example logging script in bash, as well as small example on how a specially crafted Named Pipe buffer can be used that will later store to a file of choice.
Finally I found it interesting to mention few words about logger command which can be used to log anything to many of the common / general Linux log files stored under /var/log/ – i.e. /var/log/syslog /var/log/user /var/log/daemon /var/log/mail etc.
 

1. Bash script function for logging write_log();


Perhaps the simplest method is just to use a small function routine in your shell script like this:
 

write_log()
LOG_FILE='/root/log.txt';
{
  while read text
  do
      LOGTIME=`date "+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"`
      # If log file is not defined, just echo the output
      if [ “$LOG_FILE” == “” ]; then
    echo $LOGTIME": $text";
      else
        LOG=$LOG_FILE.`date +%Y%m%d`
    touch $LOG
        if [ ! -f $LOG ]; then echo "ERROR!! Cannot create log file $LOG. Exiting."; exit 1; fi
    echo $LOGTIME": $text" | tee -a $LOG;
      fi
  done
}

 

  •  Using the script from within itself or from external to write out to defined log file

 

echo "Skipping to next copy" | write_log

 

2. Use Unix named pipes to pass data – Small intro on what is Unix Named Pipe.


Named Pipe –  a named pipe (also known as a FIFO (First In First Out) for its behavior) is an extension to the traditional pipe concept on Unix and Unix-like systems, and is one of the methods of inter-process communication (IPC). The concept is also found in OS/2 and Microsoft Windows, although the semantics differ substantially. A traditional pipe is "unnamed" and lasts only as long as the process. A named pipe, however, can last as long as the system is up, beyond the life of the process. It can be deleted if no longer used.
Usually a named pipe appears as a file, and generally processes attach to it for IPC.

 

Once named pipes were shortly explained for those who hear it for a first time, its time to say named pipe in unix / linux is created with mkfifo command, syntax is straight foward:
 

mkfifo /tmp/name-of-named-pipe


Some older Linux-es with older bash and older bash shell scripts were using mknod.
So idea behind logging script is to use a simple named pipe read input and use date command to log the exact time the command was executed, here is the script.

 

#!/bin/bash
named_pipe='/tmp/output-named-pipe';
output_named_log='
/tmp/output-named-log.txt ';

if [ -p $named_pipe ]; then
rm -f $named_pipe
fi
mkfifo $named_pipe

while true; do
read LINE <$named_pipe
echo $(date): "$LINE" >>/tmp/output-named-log.txt
done


To write out any other script output and get logged now, any of your output with a nice current date command generated output write out any output content to the loggin buffer like so:

 

echo 'Using Named pipes is so cool' > /tmp/output-named-pipe
echo 'Disk is full on a trigger' > /tmp/output-named-pipe

  • Getting the output with the date timestamp

# cat /tmp/output-named-log.txt
Mon Aug 26 15:21:29 EEST 2019: Using Named pipes is so cool
Mon Aug 26 15:21:54 EEST 2019: Disk is full on a trigger


If you wonder why it is better to use Named pipes for logging, they perform better (are generally quicker) than Unix sockets.

 

3. Logging files to system log files with logger

 

If you need to do a one time quick way to log any message of your choice with a standard Logging timestamp, take a look at logger (a part of bsdutils Linux package), and is a command which is used to enter messages into the system log, to use it simply invoke it with a message and it will log your specified output by default to /var/log/syslog common logfile

 

root@linux:/root# logger 'Here we go, logging'
root@linux:/root # tail -n 3 /var/log/syslog
Aug 26 15:41:01 localhost CRON[24490]: (root) CMD (chown qscand:qscand -R /var/run/clamav/ 2>&1 >/dev/null)
Aug 26 15:42:01 localhost CRON[24547]: (root) CMD (chown qscand:qscand -R /var/run/clamav/ 2>&1 >/dev/null)
Aug 26 15:42:20 localhost hipo: Here we go, logging

 

If you have took some time to read any of the init.d scripts on Debian / Fedora / RHEL / CentOS Linux etc. you will notice the logger logging facility is heavily used.

With logger you can print out message with different priorities (e.g. if you want to write an error message to mail.* logs), you can do so with:
 

 logger -i -p mail.err "Output of mail processing script"


To log a normal non-error (priority message) with logger to /var/log/mail.log system log.

 

 logger -i -p mail.notice "Output of mail processing script"


A whole list of supported facility named priority valid levels by logger (as taken of its current Linux manual) are as so:

 

FACILITIES AND LEVELS
       Valid facility names are:

              auth
              authpriv   for security information of a sensitive nature
              cron
              daemon
              ftp
              kern       cannot be generated from userspace process, automatically converted to user
              lpr
              mail
              news
              syslog
              user
              uucp
              local0
                to
              local7
              security   deprecated synonym for auth

       Valid level names are:

              emerg
              alert
              crit
              err
              warning
              notice
              info
              debug
              panic     deprecated synonym for emerg
              error     deprecated synonym for err
              warn      deprecated synonym for warning

       For the priority order and intended purposes of these facilities and levels, see syslog(3).

 


If you just want to log to Linux main log file (be it /var/log/syslog or /var/log/messages), depending on the Linux distribution, just type', even without any shell quoting:

 

logger 'The reason to reboot the server Currently was a System security Update

 

So what others is logger useful for?

 In addition to being a good diagnostic tool, you can use logger to test if all basic system logs with its respective priorities work as expected, this is especially
useful as I've seen on a Cloud Holsted OpenXEN based servers as a SAP consultant, that sometimes logging to basic log files stops to log for months or even years due to
syslog and syslog-ng problems hungs by other thirt party scripts and programs.
To test test all basic logging and priority on system logs as expected use the following logger-test-all-basic-log-logging-facilities.sh shell script.

 

#!/bin/bash
for i in {auth,auth-priv,cron,daemon,kern, \
lpr,mail,mark,news,syslog,user,uucp,local0 \
,local1,local2,local3,local4,local5,local6,local7}

do        
# (this is all one line!)

 

for k in {debug,info,notice,warning,err,crit,alert,emerg}
do

logger -p $i.$k "Test daemon message, facility $i priority $k"

done

done

Note that on different Linux distribution verions, the facility and priority names might differ so, if you get

logger: unknown facility name: {auth,auth-priv,cron,daemon,kern,lpr,mail,mark,news, \
syslog,user,uucp,local0,local1,local2,local3,local4, \
local5,local6,local7}

check and set the proper naming as described in logger man page.

 

4. Using a file descriptor that will output to a pre-set log file


Another way is to add the following code to the beginning of the script

#!/bin/bash
exec 3>&1 4>&2
trap 'exec 2>&4 1>&3' 0 1 2 3
exec 1>log.out 2>&1
# Everything below will go to the file 'log.out':

The code Explaned

  •     Saves file descriptors so they can be restored to whatever they were before redirection or used themselves to output to whatever they were before the following redirect.
    trap 'exec 2>&4 1>&3' 0 1 2 3
  •     Restore file descriptors for particular signals. Not generally necessary since they should be restored when the sub-shell exits.

          exec 1>log.out 2>&1

  •     Redirect stdout to file log.out then redirect stderr to stdout. Note that the order is important when you want them going to the same file. stdout must be redirected before stderr is redirected to stdout.

From then on, to see output on the console (maybe), you can simply redirect to &3. For example
,

echo "$(date) : Do print whatever you want logging to &3 file handler" >&3


I've initially found out about this very nice bash code from serverfault.com's post how can I fully log all bash script actions (but unfortunately on latest Debian 10 Buster Linux  that is prebundled with bash shell 5.0.3(1)-release the code doesn't behave exactly, well but still on older bash versions it works fine.

Sum it up


To shortlysummarize there is plenty of ways to do logging from a shell script logger command but using a function or a named pipe is the most classic. Sometimes if a script is supposed to write user or other script output to a a common file such as syslog, logger command can be used as it is present across most modern Linux distros.
If you have a better ways, please drop a common and I'll add it to this article.

 

Disable Apache access.log and error.log logging on Debian Linux and FreeBSD

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Disable Apache logging Debian and FreeBSD Linux logo

Many times disabling logging on a busy websites is quite beneficial, especially if more than few Gigabytes are written in Apache visitors log (access.log) every day. Too much visitors to Apache webserver could pose significantly increase disk writes and be negative for overall server performance.

Disabling the log is handy also for websites which already integrate a different type of visitors logging lets say – via MySQL, PostgreSQL (SQL) …

From security perspective disabling logging is a very stupid idea thought, however on systems which are experiencing high load and you need to sacrifice logging to reduce a bit the load (especially if you cannot afford to get a new server hardware), disabling it is an option.

1. Disabling access.log and error on Debian Linux

a) Disabling access.log logging
As most Debian users already know on Debian GNU Linux Apache logs all incoming (port 80) Apache requests to /var/log/apache2/access.log and /var/log/apache2/error.log

Disabling logging is very simple, just comment out line in /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default:


CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined

to


#CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined

Then restart the webserver to re-read new config value:


# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
....

Of course this is one of the ways to disable access.log logging. Other ways are to make logging gets logged in good old /dev/null. To use /dev/null forwardingp put Customlog /dev/null in /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default


CustomLog /dev/null

In Debian Lenny and older Debian releases Customlog Apache directive is found in /etc/apache2/apache2.conf.

b) Disabling error.log logging

Same procedure applies for disabling error.log, comment out default ErrorLog directive, restart Apache and you’re done:


ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log

should become:


ErrorLog /dev/null

Usually just comming ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log is supposed to work, unfortunately for reason on Debian Squeeze this worked not commenting it and restarting Apache failed to restart apache with error:


# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
Restarting web server: apache2 ... waiting (2)No such file or directory: apache2: could not open error log file /etc/apache2/logs/error_log.
Unable to open logs
Action 'start' failed.
The Apache error log may have more information.
failed!

Thus to disalbe error.log you need to add ErrorLog /dev/null in /etc/apache2/apache2.conf and once again restart Apache.


ErrorLog /dev/null


# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Bear in mind that if you use some custom virtualhosts which has the ErrorLog directive in (let’s say /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/{website-domain.com,website-domain1.com} etc. you need to change there too.
2. Disabling access.log and error.log logging on FreeBSD
On FreeBSD to disable access.log add CustomLog /dev/null to /usr/local/etc/httpd.conf and just like on Linux restart Apache:


freebsd# /usr/local/etc/rc.d/apache2 restart
....

Disaling error.log on BSD is done by changing:


ErrorLog /var/log/httpd-error.log

to


ErrorLog /dev/null

BTW disaling error.log is quite a stupid idea but in some situation, where you don’t update software versions and don’t change often webserver script interpreter and (processed) server side executables / PHP scripts it could be ok.
Still it is much better to change the amount of Apache logged information and keep error.log logging by changing:


LogLevel crit

Using LogLevel crit, will prevent Apache from logging numerous not so useless warnings in error.log, so if you have a very busy server with high loads you better use it.

Don’t expect that disabling logging will drastically improve performance usually even on Apache servers which serve more than 20 000 of requests daily disabling access.log / error.log could would probably reduce load with from 00.1 to maximum 2-3 percentage.

How to fix logging issues with Varnish configured to log client IP Addresses in Apache log

Friday, February 5th, 2010

Since a couple of days, I’ve noticed that client IP addresses are logged twice in my Apache log file
httpd-access.log. That’s definetely shit. Here is how I solved the issue:

I modified my:
/usr/local/etc/varnish/default.vcl that after the modification the file looked like:
backend default {.host = "127.0.0.1";.port = "8080";}sub vcl_recv { if (req.url ~ ".(jpg|jpeg|gif|png|tiff|tif|svg|swf|ico|mp3|mp4|m4a|ogg|mov|avi|wmv)$") { lookup; } if (req.url ~ ".(css|js)$") { lookup; } } sub vcl_fetch { if( req.request != "POST" ) { unset obj.http.set-cookie; } set obj.ttl = 600s; set obj.prefetch = -30s; deliver; }
Well that’s it after restarting varnishd with:
/usr/local/etc/rc.d/varnishd restart
Client ip is now logged only once in Apache’s log file, Cheers! 🙂